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Author Topic: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium  (Read 10563411 times)

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Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84270 on: November 22, 2017, 05:59:34 AM »
I think your math is accurate. Jorch is paid $500,000 a year from Premiere. That means: $2000 for 2 and 1/2 hours a night = $10,000 a week; $40,000 per month, which then come to roughly $480,000 a year -- which Premiere then rounds out to an even $500,000 for the year.

Spot on Dyna-X.
I see you subtracted an hour and a half of the show bec it is ads and bumber music.  But, he performs in half the ads, and he selects emerging artists.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84271 on: November 22, 2017, 06:09:01 AM »
I was so tired of hearing the same dumb interviews that I decided to change the dial and I came across another paranormal / crypto show. Has anyone heard of Beyond Reality Radio? I have no clue how this has flown under the radio. Turns out to be syndicated as well. Perhaps the monopoly will be overturned!
Doesnt work on tablet.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84272 on: November 22, 2017, 06:15:26 AM »
Right. In his mind, doing a radio show in LA and an internet-only tv show makes him some sort of hollywood celebrity.

Hmm... given all the sexual harassment claims against Celebrities and newscasters dominating the media now, it would be a good thing for several women (well not good for the women) if they came forward accusing Jorch of sexual harassment. That would finally be a sure way to knock Norry off the air for good. Premiere Network would have no choice but to can his sorry ass. For the women at least, their humiliation and sacrifice would not be in vain.
He has invited the needy to the tsble in years past.  This year, he said he is having emergency responders over. 

All sass in the forum, and then all sheep in monthly chat!

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84273 on: November 22, 2017, 06:21:06 AM »
I think it's the deep voice-over guy when they come back from break who says "This is coast to coast am, with George Norry", then Jorch goes "it sure is...". Art bell used to do this often, but i haven't really heard norry do this until i read your post. So i guess add that to the list off things he's ripped off of Art, even if it is seemingly a little thing. THere is nothing original about Norry.

Jorch is full of crap.. he takes most friday's off to enjoy himself a nice three day weekend but still contends to the audience that he "never takes a day off". So, please Jorch, don't give me that crap about working on holidays. Plus you're job is a nightjob anyway where you're on the air for 2 and a half hours excluding commercials. Most folk are done with their turkey dinner by 10 pm. And i don't want to hear your bogus "8 hour preparatory work". Are you that slow it takes you 8 hours to come up with a dozen middle-school questions for your guests? Lets not pretend you do research either.. Fat Tommee and your other staff will have that all done for your lazy butt.
He doesnt say never a day off; he says he doesn't take much personal time off.  He does work some Sundays.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84274 on: November 22, 2017, 06:23:33 AM »
I can’t decide if I think JoJo is Doc Wallet or drunk Jorch Noory.
Jojo is admittedly a recovering alcoholic, not a docwolic, honey.  And on a diet, too!  Hard to sleep when hungry!

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84275 on: November 22, 2017, 06:36:00 AM »
Laugh all you want. Did you forget the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission implies Premiere Networks in a criminal investigation and conviction when it cites among the "tools" to carry out the fraud by one its guests (Litigation Release No. 22619 / February 15, 2013) was "Coast To Coast AM." Those who may have provided the means to commit the fraud. Try "laughing" off that now.

Laugh about "triggered" all you want. Know federal-law enforcement even names "Coast To Coast AM" and perhaps a charge of conspiracy to commit fraud may result. Keep laughing, buddy -- and then see who the laugh is on! Some of the endorsed guests -- and maybe more down the road -- are laughing all the way to the state and federal penitentiaries. Yes, "triggered" when we see people cheated. "Triggered" when we see crimes and may have such associations investigated.

Yes, being "triggered" is a great thing in bringing fraudulent crooks to justice, friend. Thanks for the compliment! That only spurs such as me on more!

Release 66219 is below.  It doesn't relate to anyone I've ever heard of at Premiere, but maybe I missed a guest?  And before you say in bold that I'm walking with the Devil or gonna do jail time just because I happen to see things differently than you, this isn't China.  I suppose you meant Sean David Morton, but he is not referenced in the data below.

What I would like to see is FCC chapter and verse stating broadcast rules for words like "cure" and "disclaimers" regarding programs by a licensed naturopathic doctor.  I have dug deep, and I see no such rules, except for product packaging.  You obviously know how to navigate government docs (ha jpha, docs...) but give me citations that actually support your view.  So far, like the last six months, the references don't show me what you mean.
__________________________________________
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
 
before the
 
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
 
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
Rel. No. 66219 / January 24, 2012
Admin. Proc. File No. 3-14482
:
In the Matter of :
 :
BENJAMIN W. YOUNG, JR. :
__________________________________________:
NOTICE THAT INITIAL DECISION HAS BECOME FINAL
The time for filing a petition for review of the initial decision in this proceeding has
expired. No such petition has been filed by Benjamin W. Young, Jr. and the Commission has not
chosen to review the decision on its own initiative.
Accordingly, notice is hereby given, pursuant to Rule 360(d) of the Commission's Rules
of Practice, 1/ that the initial decision of the administrative law judge 2/ has become the final
decision of the Commission with respect to Benjamin W. Young, Jr. The order contained in that
decision is hereby declared effective. The initial decision ordered that Benjamin W. Young, Jr.,
is barred from association with any broker or dealer.
For the Commission by the Office of the General Counsel, pursuant to delegated
authority.
Elizabeth M. Murphy
 Secretary
1/ 17 C.F.R. § 201.360(d).
2/ Benjamin W. Young, Jr., Initial Decision Rel. No. 445 (Dec. 16, 2011), __ SEC Docket
___.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84276 on: November 22, 2017, 07:18:03 AM »
Yes, that "jorged.jpeg" haunting image... Looks like those overpriced, total rip-off "Youngevity" supplements have made Jorch look younger and so better, huh?

This photo says it all about that guy. That's why he needs to stay on radio. He's bad enough heard -- but seen? That's a terrible image and no thanks, I have enough shock in my life to add the sight of Noory to make it worse. He looks like something the cat dragged in, for sure. And creepy, to boot. Very creepy looking guy. A good visual testament as to why you should keep your kids off the internet and especially that "Coast Insider" chat if he is present!


HWGA, you are right about this!

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84277 on: November 22, 2017, 07:38:56 AM »
You s ound a bit nutty, but just in case you're simply grossly misinformed here is a link to the US government agency that makes most of the rules ''doctors'' and others in the medical profession must follow.  You may wish to become familiar with the organization, and with some of the rules and regulations they impose.  These rules are based on Congressional legislation, and are the law of the land.  Many, if not most, are intended to insure public safety regarding food and medicine.

https://www.fda.gov/   


I'm just saying that U.S.laws permit women to insert tampons and penises, but not the Today Sponge, a small round sponge. When used as recommended, it has a success rate about as high as hormonal birth control.  So, cite all the laws necessary about medical disclaimers, but realize the law is heavily biased in favor of pharmaceuticals.


Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84278 on: November 22, 2017, 07:50:30 AM »
Here's a scary thought.  Maybe there's more than one Noory.

That is a scary thought. Maybe the CIA has a dozen Jorch Noory's running around.



Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84279 on: November 22, 2017, 07:54:25 AM »
Excuse me, but you sound more than a bit unhinged. Very much out of touch with reality, and obviously someone who has no "real-life" medical experience...

You make no sense. None...
Then take it from US News:

Medical errors in the U.S. are THE THIRD LEADING cause of death not drug dealers.
https://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-05-03/medical-errors-are-third-leading-cause-of-death-in-the-us
The above info was part of the broadcast, if I recall.
I'm not part of any of the organizations you cite, but I have worked in a hospital, I have studied nutrition, and I listen carefully to the radio.
Just because I disagreed with you doesn't mean I worked for a group you despise, or were going to prison, or were deranged.
And per your past posts, I am not the first exasperated person to use all caps in response to you.
BTW, Wallach is a doctor.  He has the degree.

Like PB Deplorable says, I have read the websites you both mention.  But I have yet to see anywhere that a licensed doctor can't make medical statements on radio.  Please show me where, and I dont mean that section about labeling because whether or not that is true, it is clearly a stretch.  A real law would be specific to radio.


Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84280 on: November 22, 2017, 08:43:29 AM »
Then take it from US News:

Medical errors in the U.S. are THE THIRD LEADING cause of death not drug dealers.
https://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-05-03/medical-errors-are-third-leading-cause-of-death-in-the-us
The above info was part of the broadcast, if I recall.
I'm not part of any of the organizations you cite, but I have worked in a hospital, I have studied nutrition, and I listen carefully to the radio.
Just because I disagreed with you doesn't mean I worked for a group you despise, or were going to prison, or were deranged.
And per your past posts, I am not the first exasperated person to use all caps in response to you.
BTW, Wallach is a doctor.  He has the degree.

Like PB Deplorable says, I have read the websites you both mention.  But I have yet to see anywhere that a licensed doctor can't make medical statements on radio.  Please show me where, and I dont mean that section about labeling because whether or not that is true, it is clearly a stretch.  A real law would be specific to radio.

Wallach is not an MD. He is a veterinarian that went and got a N.D. (Naturopathic Medicine).

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84281 on: November 22, 2017, 09:26:59 AM »
Wallach is not an MD. He is a veterinarian that went and got a N.D. (Naturopathic Medicine).

Probably a large animal vet that spent most of his time with his arm shoved up a cow's cooter.

A Law Specific To Radio? Try 47 U.S.C. § 317; 47 C.F.R. § 73.1212
« Reply #84282 on: November 22, 2017, 05:14:36 PM »
A real law would be specific to radio.

Like this one?:

BEGIN QUOTE:<<"Section 317 of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. § 317, requires broadcasters to disclose to their listeners or viewers if matter has been aired in exchange for money, services or other valuable consideration. The announcement must be aired when the subject matter is broadcast. The Commission has adopted a rule, 47 C.F.R. § 73.1212, which sets forth the broadcasters' responsibilities to make this sponsorship identification

Section 507 of the Communications Act, 47 U.S.C. § 508, requires that, when anyone provides or promises to provide money, services or other consideration to someone to include program matter in a broadcast, that fact must be disclosed in advance of the broadcast, ultimately to the station over which the matter is to be aired.  Both the person providing or promising to provide the money, services or other consideration and the recipient are obligated to make this disclosure so that the station may broadcast the sponsorship identification announcement required by Section 317 of the Communications Act.  Failure to disclose such payment or the providing of services or other consideration, or promise to provide them, is commonly referred to as "payola'' and is punishable by a fine of not more than $10,000 or imprisonment for not more than one year or both. These criminal penalties bring violations within the purview of the Department of Justice.

Thus, for example, if a record company or its agent pays a broadcaster to play records on the air, those payments do not violate these provisions of the law if the required sponsorship identification information is timely aired by the broadcast station. If it is not aired as required by the Communications Act and the Commission's rules, the station and others are subject to enforcement action.

If record companies, or their agents, are paying persons other than the broadcast licensee (such as the station's Music Director or its on-air personality) to have records aired, and fail to disclose that fact to the licensee, the person making such payments, and the recipient, are also subject to criminal fine, imprisonment or both, for violation of the disclosure requirements contained in Section 507.">> END QUOTE

In other words, any such "news, editorial or program matter" that a program claims is not "paid programming," when such may not be disclosing the full nature of the "partnership" of any such relations, or in which anyone involved with such program may be receiving "money, compensation or anything of value" in the guise of such "news programs" -- i.e. "kickbacks" -- may perhaps be in violation of federal-broadcasting laws.

And any all "business ties" any such program and its staff may hold with such "news guests" must also be disclosed as outlined above. George Noory has stated -- and I have recorded -- that "criticalhealthnews(dot)" is "our website" and has "our webmasters" who maintain it. Who does this "our" reference apply to? "Ours" as in belonging to himself and others?

In recent broadcasts, which I have recorded, Noory has failed to air that the "news guest" and the company he or she represents is "a paid sponsor" to such program. Re-read the above federal code or regulations: "If it is not aired as required by the Communications Act and the Commission's rules, the station and others are subject to enforcement action."

Fair enough?

And From Youngevity International Corp. v. Wakaya Perfection, LLC et al
« Reply #84283 on: November 22, 2017, 05:52:15 PM »
From Youngevity International Corp. v. Wakaya Perfection, LLC et al:
<<BEGIN QUOTE:
45.
Together with Youngevity’s founder, Dr . Wallach, the Wallach Group engaged in counterproductive behavior, including undermining promising acquisitions, promoting ill-conceived and unprofitable business decisions, concealing certain acts from management, and engaging in inappropriate and dishonest behavior.  The following examples, as set forth in Paragraphs 46-58, are illustrative of such behavior:
46.   
On information and belief, Youngevity’s  Founder, Dr. Wallach, frequently engaged in a pattern of traveling with and sharing hotel rooms at Youngevity events with a variety of female companions other than his wife, some of whom are Youngevity distributors. This behavior was widely known within the Youngevity community.

47.
Taking advantage of the influence he held as founder of Youngevity, Dr. Wallach routinely attempted to coerce distributors, including Vaughn and the Pitcocks, into inserting Dr. Wallach’s female companions into favored positions in their distributors’ organization. The Wallach Group tolerated, and thereby condoned, this behavior, despite its highly inappropriate nature.

48.
When the Distributor Plaintiffs protested about Dr. Wallach’s manipulation of their organizational structures, the Wallach Group reacted in vindictive and defensive ways. For example, when any distributor refused to insert Dr. Wallach’s companions into his or her organization, Dr. Wallach threatened to never participate in events or otherwise help them promote their business. Often this threat from the founder of the company was enough to compel compliance.
49.
When the Pitcocks objected to Dr. Wallach’s attempts to force distributors to insert his companions into their organizations—which the Pitcocks viewed as an abuse of power and highly damaging to the morale of  Youngevity’s distributors—consistent with their usual practice, the Wallach Group reacted defensively and vindictively.
>>END QUOTE
------------------
More of his behavior can be read here. The inks provide more background on this. Check out the court documents if you really want some "truth" to what is going on with these "devoted healers" who appear to be playing gullible, ignorant and medically desperate suckers for fools to sell them their snake oil -- then daring to claim they represent "values, integrity" or worse, "God himself."

http://behindmlm.com/companies/youngevity/dr-wallachs-sex-life-a-focal-point-in-youngevity-wakaya-lawsuit/


http://behindmlm.com/companies/how-wakaya-perfection-and-todd-smith-gutted-youngevity/

And Wallach and his "people" are what you are defending?

BREAKING: George Noory Has "Conscious Awareness," Dedicates Life To Pizza Making
« Reply #84284 on: November 22, 2017, 06:25:15 PM »
*Disclaimer: The following is obvious satire, not mean to present any reality, nor does it claim to have any insight on the life of the self-professed 'King Of Overnight Radio":

BREAKING: Radio host George Noory undergoes a complete "conscious awareness" realizing that his life is empty, claiming he works on holidays to "be there" for the listeners he calls his "family" -- and showing how he treats such, as he attempts to sucker them into some schemes to take their confidence, faith and money as said "family" -- instead of being with his real family unlike normal, well-adjusted radio hosts do, then recalls his dreaded "Drama In Real Life" after he almost lost his life to a pizza roll years ago.

Noory has decided to test "The Razor's Edge" by coming to realization and peace with pizza. He gives up his radio career, moves to Italy, and becomes a master pizza chef at a restaurant in that country. Feeling fulfilled once he has comes to grips with the pizza that almost killed him, he learns Italian fluently, sets himself up at "Maestro pizzaiolo di Soverato - Guarda le sue Pizze su" and becomes a "new man" and respected member of his new-found "family."

Here's a video clip of the "new" George Noory at work. Yes, he appears to have come to peace with pizza, and by addressing his fears over that horrible incident he has "moved on" from that "incident" he once described on radio. Once a victim of some "pizza roll," he now has become its strongest advocate:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qnfl32YGKSo


Further, George Nooy explains how to make pizza rolls:


And further at (note the other man in kitchen says "this is Noory" in Italian...there are no coincidences):

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84285 on: November 22, 2017, 07:37:10 PM »

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84286 on: November 22, 2017, 07:55:41 PM »
From Youngevity International Corp. v. Wakaya Perfection, LLC et al:
<<BEGIN QUOTE:
45.
Together with Youngevity’s founder, Dr . Wallach, the Wallach Group engaged in counterproductive behavior, including undermining promising acquisitions, promoting ill-conceived and unprofitable business decisions, concealing certain acts from management, and engaging in inappropriate and dishonest behavior.  The following examples, as set forth in Paragraphs 46-58, are illustrative of such behavior:
46.   
On information and belief, Youngevity’s  Founder, Dr. Wallach, frequently engaged in a pattern of traveling with and sharing hotel rooms at Youngevity events with a variety of female companions other than his wife, some of whom are Youngevity distributors. This behavior was widely known within the Youngevity community.

47.
Taking advantage of the influence he held as founder of Youngevity, Dr. Wallach routinely attempted to coerce distributors, including Vaughn and the Pitcocks, into inserting Dr. Wallach’s female companions into favored positions in their distributors’ organization. The Wallach Group tolerated, and thereby condoned, this behavior, despite its highly inappropriate nature.

48.
When the Distributor Plaintiffs protested about Dr. Wallach’s manipulation of their organizational structures, the Wallach Group reacted in vindictive and defensive ways. For example, when any distributor refused to insert Dr. Wallach’s companions into his or her organization, Dr. Wallach threatened to never participate in events or otherwise help them promote their business. Often this threat from the founder of the company was enough to compel compliance.
49.
When the Pitcocks objected to Dr. Wallach’s attempts to force distributors to insert his companions into their organizations—which the Pitcocks viewed as an abuse of power and highly damaging to the morale of  Youngevity’s distributors—consistent with their usual practice, the Wallach Group reacted defensively and vindictively.
>>END QUOTE
------------------
More of his behavior can be read here. The inks provide more background on this. Check out the court documents if you really want some "truth" to what is going on with these "devoted healers" who appear to be playing gullible, ignorant and medically desperate suckers for fools to sell them their snake oil -- then daring to claim they represent "values, integrity" or worse, "God himself."

http://behindmlm.com/companies/youngevity/dr-wallachs-sex-life-a-focal-point-in-youngevity-wakaya-lawsuit/


http://behindmlm.com/companies/how-wakaya-perfection-and-todd-smith-gutted-youngevity/

And Wallach and his "people" are what you are defending?


Doveryai, no proveryai.

A 10-second Google search demonstrates that you are presenting this with bias.  The truth is, Youngevity filed against Wakaya first.  Everyone knows, when you sue someone, if they counter-sue, it is vindictive and retaliatory.  After all, if the defendant (Wakaya) truly had an any original grievance, they would have filed a lawsuit on its own merit, rather than react to accusations by filing a defamatory counter-suit.

>>> Start quote: "Smith has facilitated, aided, and abetted the violation of Youngevity contractual agreements in an effort to induce Youngevity distributors to breach their contracts with Youngevity and to cause business opportunities meant for Youngevity to be diverted to Wakaya. Smith has encouraged or solicited Youngevity distributors to take actions that violate their contractual agreements with Youngevity.

He has disseminated false and misleading information concerning Youngevity’s finances and financial standing in an effort to disparage Youngevity and thereby draw distributors and business away from Youngevity and to Wakaya."End quote<<<<<<

https://www.businessforhome.org/2016/05/youngevity-vs-wakaya-perfection-law-suit-amended-complaint/

Once again, checking sources to verify your take, did not pan out.  The thing is, I think I have told you this one before. 

1.  HWGA's take on legal background of Wakaya did not pan out.  https://www.businessforhome.org/2016/05/youngevity-vs-wakaya-perfection-law-suit-amended-complaint/

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84287 on: November 22, 2017, 08:02:46 PM »
Probably a large animal vet that spent most of his time with his arm shoved up a cow's cooter.

Well, actually........... you don't go for the cooter. Unless you live in West Virginia. You go the Hershey highway. Or grass highway in this instance.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84288 on: November 22, 2017, 08:08:05 PM »
I've been listening to a lot of Richard Syrett shows. Youtube and podcasts.

Listening to Syrett's shows makes me feel smarter. Like I'm sitting in a college classroom listening to a professor. The information in unparalleled. Topics are deep, the line of questioning well thought out...........

Listening to Snoory's show is like watching Captain Kangaroo reruns. Basic, so very very basic. Picture Pages with Bill Cosby will the the most stimulating part of the show. I feel dumber for having sat through it. I'm not proud of myself, definitely not proud of myself.........

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84289 on: November 22, 2017, 09:09:27 PM »
I've been listening to a lot of Richard Syrett shows. Youtube and podcasts.

Listening to Syrett's shows makes me feel smarter. Like I'm sitting in a college classroom listening to a professor. The information in unparalleled. Topics are deep, the line of questioning well thought out...........

Listening to Snoory's show is like watching Captain Kangaroo reruns. Basic, so very very basic. Picture Pages with Bill Cosby will the the most stimulating part of the show. I feel dumber for having sat through it. I'm not proud of myself, definitely not proud of myself.........

Be thankful for what you have and for what you have not.  It will soon be Thanksgiving, and you will feed your mind and body with stimulating thoughts.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84290 on: November 22, 2017, 09:12:21 PM »
Norry has been satired to be the Mr. Pillow salesman.

Today, I was watching the news, and a commercial for Mr. Pillow came on.  There is a second in the advertisement where Mr. Pillow is setting with a headset and a microphone on.  That was like you would do if you were hosting a radio show. 

Someone has been reading the websites about Norry, I am sure, and that was a casual reference to their satire. 

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84291 on: November 23, 2017, 01:53:44 AM »
Norry, 

Happy Thanksgiving from "Grampers Pampers."  You're hungry, we're ready!  When you have those turkey trots and lots of leftovers, Grampers will be there with a our stuffing to serve you.  Strut like a turkey and wear those Grampers proud.  Don't let Black Friday start on your Tryptophan Thursday without your Grampers.  The harvest is plentiful on your table and you can plant in Grampers.  Be full!

The Grampers Family.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84292 on: November 23, 2017, 04:33:25 AM »
You are a SHILL.Doctors do not make the prices in Hospitals.The insurance companies and the Hospital Board sets the prices for ex. aspirin.Do mistakes happen of course but for you to say all Dr's are bad is just like saying all  Cops are bad,all blacks are on welfare etc.  Good healers never take money for their work Than Explainn THE HIGH PRICES WALLET CHARGES?
 For you to stick up for an obvious snake oil salesman you are A.working for CTC or Vet.Wallet in some fashion.B. Plain Ignorant.  C.Troll D.All The Above              GNS
Exactly.  That's what I'm saying.  The quality of care most doctors provide is controlled by insurance companies who have never examined the patient.  I never said Wallach was perfect.  My comments are to be taken in the context of HWGA's incessant rants against naturopathic healthcare.  For every item HWGA claims naturopaths do wrong, I'm just saying there is a corresponding item that doctors do wrong too (see list).  Medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the U.S.  THIRD!

Wallach is not selling snake oil.  You need those nutrients, and he is a doctor.

I am not a troll.  I dont know what shill means.  I dont work for Coast or Wallach!  I'm not afraid to admit I may be a little ignorant in some areas.  But I take the time to verify HWGAs sources, and I have become exasperated with his antics, because most of the time, the sources he cites do not quite support his main points.

Naturopathy is a highly respected field.  It is so glam right now that mainstream doctors are starting to offer naturopathic options along with their regular care.

I'm very glad ItsOver got the help he needed from good doctors.  Just as HWGA solely focuses on criticisms of naturopathic doctors, many criticisms can also be made of allopathic doctors.  Just as HWGA could, if he wanted, realize that many naturopaths provide good help, so also I concede that many doctors provide good help.  HWGA is making all naturopaths out to be bad.  A even easier case could be made as well, that it is equally bad to visit allopathic doctors, since their errors are the third leading cause of death in the U.S.  The experts are not saying alternative medicine is the third leading cause of death.  But experts ARE saying medical errors are the third leading cause of death.

Not car accidents.  Not heart attacks.  Not cancer.   Not deployments.  Not disasters.  Not naturopaths.  Medical errors.




Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84293 on: November 23, 2017, 12:05:41 PM »
I listened to a little of sNoory’s Kennedy assassination show last night. He was clearly excited and interested in the topic. He asked questions that did not seem to be from 3x5 cards. He was worse than ever.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84294 on: November 24, 2017, 02:57:22 AM »
I listened to a little of sNoory’s Kennedy assassination show last night. He was clearly excited and interested in the topic. He asked questions that did not seem to be from 3x5 cards. He was worse than ever.
Maybe he's planning another book.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84295 on: November 24, 2017, 05:23:06 PM »
All George's leftovers were raided before Midnight last night!

Needs another kitchen or a smaller table!!!!  Wouldn't you be embarrassed to go to a deli the day after Thanksgiving?  "Uh, I'll take a turkey please"!




Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84296 on: November 24, 2017, 06:53:01 PM »
But before he could get seconds, his feast was raided.  "There was nothing left!" he said.  Gonna need a second kitchen or a smaller table!  Pot luck?


Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84297 on: November 24, 2017, 11:57:12 PM »

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84298 on: November 25, 2017, 01:21:44 AM »
You didn't answer the question about what's true regarding Wallach's claims. I laid out 3 general ones that you simply ignored.

There are no statistics on "naturopathic" doctors because they can't be placed in a scientific study since any person can claim to be "Holistic". In other words, there is no scientific course or graduate body for the field "Naturopahy". It is simply a hobby for those who partake in it.

My argument isn't against "naturopathic" or Holistic Doctors. If it suits you better to see them for your healthcare needs then more power to you. My argument is against "Doc" Wallach specifically and his outlandish claims and untruths he spouts to profit on the gullible, as so many in this thread have also stated for the record.

You should really take a look at: http://skepdic.com/wallach.html .  Here are some excerpts you will find illuminating if you really can independently think and not be blinded by your bias of the medical establishment; which I admit there are malpractice claims and bad doctors a lot of the time -- i don't deny that. But painting every MD with a broad brush is dangerous business in my view.

Here are the excerpts:

The basic danger of Wallach's theories is not that taking colloidal minerals will harm people or even that many people will be wasting their money on a product they do not need. Many of his claims are not backed up by scientific randomized control studies, but are anecdotal or fictional. The basic danger is that because he and other naturopaths exaggerate the role of minerals in good health, they may be totally ignored by the scientific community even if they happen to hit on some real connections between minerals and disease. Furthermore, there is the chance that legitimate scientific researchers may avoid this field for fear of being labeled a kook.

Wallach falsely claims that there are five cultures in the world that have average life spans of between 120 and 140 years: the Tibetans in Western China; the Hunzas in Eastern Pakistan; the Russian Georgians and the Armenians, the Abkhasians, and the Azerbaijanis. He also mentions the people of the Vilcabamba in Ecuador and those who live around Lake Titicaca in Peru and Bolivia. The secret of their longevity is "glacier milk" (water full of colloidal minerals). The basis for these claims seems to be Wallach's imagination.

The label on the "Dead Doctors Don't Lie" tape says "Learn why the average life span of an MD is only 58 years." On his tape, Dr. Wallach claims that "the average life span of an American is 75 years, but the average life span of an American doctor is only 58 years!" Maybe dead doctors don't lie, but this living one certainly does. According to Kevin Kenward of the American Medical Association: "Based on over 210,000 records of deceased physicians, our data indicate the average life-span of a physician is 70.8 years." One wonders where Dr. Wallach got his data. The only mention in his tape of data on physician deaths is in his description of a rather gruesome hobby of his: he collects obituaries of local physicians as he takes his mineral show from town to town.

On his tape, Wallach says

"...what I did was go back to school and become a physician. I finally got a license to kill (laughter), and they allowed me to use everything I had learned in veterinary school about nutrition on my human patients. And to no surprise to me, it worked. I spent 12 years up in Portland, Oregon, in general practice, and it was very fascinating."

Wallach is not a physician, but an N.D., a doctor of naturopathy. It is unlikely that most of the people in his audiences know that naturopaths aren't really physicians and that there is a big difference between an M.D. and an N.D. He also claims he did hundreds of autopsies on humans while working as a veterinarian in St. Louis. How does a veterinarian get to do human autopsies?

"...Well, again, to make a long story short, over a period of some twelve years I did 17,500 autopsies on over 454 species of animals and 3,000 human beings who lived in close proximity to the zoos, and the thing I found out was this: every animal and every human being who dies of natural causes dies of a nutritional deficiency."

If he really did do all those autopsies and then concluded that every animal or human who dies of natural causes dies because of a nutritional deficiency, then he qualifies for the Ignoble or Ignoramus Prize. To accomplish his autopsy feat, he would have to have done six autopsies a day, working 5 days a week for 12 years, taking only a 2-week vacation each year. He was allegedly performing all these autopsies in addition to his other duties and presumably while he was writing essays and books as well.

an attack on doctors and a panegyric to minerals

Wallach's "Dead Doctors Don't Lie" tape is both an attack on the medical profession and a panegyric for minerals. The attack is vicious and mostly unwarranted, which weakens his credibility about the wonders of mineral supplements. He does not come across as an objective, impersonal scientist. He delights in ridiculing "Haavaad" University and cardiologists who die young from heart attacks, many of whom went into the field because of congenital heart defects.

Wallach seems to ignore the importance of genetics in human diseases. He reverts to name-calling on several occasions, as well. Doctors, he says, routinely commit many practices that would be considered illegal in other fields. At one point he claims that the average M.D. makes over $200,000 a year in kickbacks. This ludicrous claim didn't even get a peep of skeptical bewilderment from his audience. [The tape is of a live recording of one of his shows.] He sounds like a bitter, rejected oddball who is getting even with the medical profession for ignoring him and his "research," much of which consists of studies on such things as "hair analysis," a common mark of the quack. His bitterness toward science-based medicine makes Wallach attractive to those with an axe to grind against the medical profession.


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You are wrong about Selenium being the "secret" mineral Wallach talks about. Even Noory on his programs with him sometimes says to listeners that "Wallach will not give away the mineral" when discussing certain ailments the the person is "nutritionally deficient" in.

If you he gives a list of everything as you say -- then why charge the prices he does on his "website store" if everything can be picked up locally at your drug store?

Again, I quote:

Wallach seems to be most famous for a widely circulated audiotape he calls "Dead Doctors Don't Lie." [It is also available in video tape and book form.] The label on the tape notes that Wallach was a Nobel Prize nominee. This is true, but meaningless. He was nominated for a Nobel Prize in medicine by the Association of Eclectic Physicians "for his notable and untiring work with deficiencies of the trace mineral selenium and its relationship to the congenital genesis of Cystic Fibrosis." The Association of Eclectic Physicians is a group of naturopaths founded in 1982 by Edward Alstat and Michael Ancharski. In his book Let's Play Doctor (co-authored with Ma Lan, M.D., M.S.) Wallach states that cystic fibrosis is preventable, is 100% curable in the early stages, can be managed very well in chronic cases, leading to a normal life expectancy (75 years). If these claims were true, he might have won the Prize. He didn't win, but he gave a lot of false hope to parents of children with cystic fibrosis. The fact is that Wallach's "research" on cystic fibrosis was, to put it kindly, incompetent. The "people he studied were self-selected, and not randomized; he did not follow an appropriate data-gathering protocol; his diagnoses were made with a questionnaire; and his report made claims about other data that were either unsupported or unreferenced."* In fact, cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder that "causes the body to produce unusually thick, sticky mucus that:

--Clogs the lungs and leads to life-threatening lung infections.

--Obstructs the pancreas and stops natural enzymes from helping the body break down food and absorb vital nutrients."*

"Many people with the disease can now expect to live into their 30s, 40s and beyond,"* but not because of mineral supplements or thanks to anything Wallach did.


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...In the early 1980's, Wallach called himself a "Manner Metabolic Physician'' and treated cancer patients with laetrile, a substance that should not be used to treat cancer. In 1990 he also worked with Kurt Donsbach at the notorious Tijuana clinic Hospital Santa Monica. In 1995, Wallach was using chelation therapy for heart disease, a common misuse of this therapy by quacks. A relative of one of Wallach's patients reported his concerns to the National Council Against Health Fraud when the patient died in Wallach's care. The relative expressed concern that "Wallach had convinced the patient not to be treated by his regular physician; thus he did not seek proper medical help and died."*

There is no scientific data supporting the claim that all diseases are due to mineral deficiencies. A deficiency or excess of zinc can cause serious health problems. Iron deficiency is a well-known health problem. And there is a good reason for magnesium being a common ingredient in laxatives and antacids. But unless one has a specific deficiency, there is no known health benefit from ingesting daily supplements, colloidal or otherwise, unless one considers it a health benefit to feel that you are in control of your well-being by taking supplements. Numerous studies have failed to find any health benefit from taking supplements "just in case" you might be deficient in one or more vitamins or minerals. Editors at the Annals of Internal Medicine put it this way:

Most supplements do not prevent chronic disease or death, their use is not justified, and they should be avoided.... After years of study and mostly disappointing results, enough is enough. What we've found time and again is that the supplements are not working… we don't need to go on studying them forever....most of the 53% of U.S. consumers who use supplements are wasting money, to the tune of $28 billion a year.*

Since one-third of U.S. adults take supplements despite the lack of scientific evidence in support of the practice, characters like Wallach have a large market of eager customers waiting to be told lies that make them feel they can control their health with minimal effort just by opening their mouths and their wallets. The only reputable scientific study I know of that found a "modest" reduction in the risk of cancer from taking daily supplements was published in the Journal of the American Medical Society in 2012. The study involved over 14,000 male physicians over four years. One group got daily multivitamin tabs, the other group got a placebo.

Wallach claims that minerals in foods and most supplements are "metallic" and not as effective as "plant-based" colloidal minerals, which is nonsense because colloidal minerals are also "metallic," i.e., contain trace amounts of aluminum and heavy metals. Being colloidal has more to do with the origin, size, and structure of the mineral particles that with their effectiveness. Being metallic is irrelevant. Wallach claims that metallic minerals (i.e., regular vitamins and minerals) are only 8-12% absorb-able while colloidal minerals are 98% absorb-able. No data support this claim; Wallach seems to have made it up.* (A colloid is "a substance that consists of particles dispersed throughout another substance which are too small for resolution with an ordinary light microscope but are incapable of passing through a semipermeable membrane." --Merriam-Webster)

And probably most important that cannot be overstated:

Wallach makes his claims about minerals despite the fact that in 1993 a research team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia, reported the results of a 13-year study on 10,758 Americans which failed to find any mortality benefits from vitamin and mineral supplements. The study found that even though supplement users smoke and drink less than non-users, eat more fruits and vegetables than non-users, and are more affluent than non-users, they didn't live any longer than non-users. The study also found no benefit from taking vitamin and mineral supplements for smokers, heavy drinkers, or those with chronic diseases.

In May 2006, a committee of physicians impaneled by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced that little information exists as to whether people should take supplements. The previous March the NIH noted that research suggests that vitamins and other supplements may do more harm than good, and that antioxidants are of little use.* Further research has found that vitamin supplements can even be deadly.* The simple fact is that there is no compelling scientific evidence that vitamin or mineral supplements beneficially affect the health or longevity of most people. Those suffering from a vitamin or mineral deficiency should take supplements, but there is no merit to Wallach's claim that most or all diseases are due to mineral deficiencies.

Wallach's basic appeal is to offer hope to people who fear or are mistrustful of medical doctors and scientific knowledge. He gives hope to those who want to live for a really long time. He gives hope to those who are diagnosed with diseases for which current medical knowledge has no cure. He gives hope to those who want to avoid getting a terminal disease. And he gives hope to those who want to be healthy but who do not want to diet or exercise. All we have to do is ingest a magic elixir of colloidal minerals and we'll be healthy. You can't just take your minerals in pill form, he warns us. You must take the colloidal variety in liquid form. Until he had a falling out with T.J. Clark & Co., this elixir had to come from special pits in Utah. After John H. Renner, M.D., President of the National Council Against Health Fraud, exposed the "distortions, bogus science, and outright lies" in Wallach's tape, T.J. Clark & Co. "severed its business relationship with him."  Wallach then "revised his 'scientific' opinion and quickly moved on to find new partners."*


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Sorry for the long post, but it was important for this information to get out.
Well, Mike, I didn't mean to avoid three of your questions.  There is just so much room for disagreement on this topic.  I try to go for whatever is funniest, most passionate or easy to support.  Maybe I didnt have strong feelings about your questions - i really dont know and this tablet is too small to see them at the moment.

For instance, some people might not respond to your concern about Wallach not being a doctor... simply because where I live, a naturopath IS a doctor, and is respected more than a doctor, especially by women.  I have known several naturopaths personally.   The whole argument about the professional label would seem retarded to me.  I was just raised differently, in a different paradigm.  Kind of like I wouldn't argue if someone said oranges are blue - it wouldnt even make sense for me to get involved in that part of a discussion because it would seem irrelevant.

From the shows I listened to, selenium was clearly the mystery mineral.  That was very meaningful to me because selenium helps lots of things.  But, like you say, it sounds like there are other things he keeps as a mystery.

The reason he lists all the nutrients is because he cares about people.  The reason he sells specialized formulas is because shoppers with that kind of money don't want to make their own formulas.  They can buy tasty, portion controlled versions right from Wallach, so it's more convenient.  Because those kind of shoppers usually are well employed, and dont have time to mess around with homemade formulations or hodge-podge assortments.  From Wallach, they can get compatible paks, without paying for redundancy.  I dont know how much you have used or shopped for vitamins, but it can be very frustrating.  Sometimes, calcium comes with magnesium and zinc, sometimes it doesnt.  Should you then subtract magnesium and zinc from your regular multi-vitamin?  Quandries like that.  Dealing with simples and compounds, trying to piece it all together without specialized equipment.  There are people who actually stuff their own gel tabs! They are sold at health food stores.

Plus, Wallach's products are easily absorbed (presumably), easy to take, and probably seasoned to taste.

It's kind of like how someone can get their cosmetics or tools in a haphazard fashion (as I do), or they can buy a big set, complete from the factory.  A complete set might provide uniform coverage, uniform strength, and be nicely packaged and easy to store.  Where, a hodge podge might be more versatile, but messier, with a variety of labels making the whole set more confusing.

Wallach works in alternative medicine.  They don't care as much about patents and proprietary stuff, like Capitalist-mentality companies.  Many alternative medicine providers are kind of anti-patent.  Or would like a more consumer friendly patent system.  If he gives away lists of nutrients, that could be why.  Alternative providers tend to be more open and educational. He doesn't rely on traditional obsfucation to make a profit.  But, he presumably wants to make a profit, so he does guard some of his knowledge.  He profits from his skill and ability to "put it altogether" for consumers because, like you said, people can overdose on vitamins, and also because some busy people just don't want to take the time to make their own portions.

Vitamins and minerals are expensive.  It would be easy for a working class person to justify paying more for expertise.  "Ah, they already cost a lot.  What's a little more for good service...". I don't know what Wallach charges, but if the add-on amount over generic vitamins is below a certain ratio, it could be easily justified.

Nutritional health takes time.  It's not like a rehular prescription.  I've heard it can take the better part of a year before curing a condition.  I took an alternative homeopathic remedy for a couple years before I finally cured the condition.  But the condition was truly cured, for over ten years.  If I had gone to a regular doctor, I'd still be shelling out for a prescription.


Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84299 on: November 25, 2017, 04:40:57 AM »
Ha!  Jorch looks like he just came off of a cabernet bender.



Maybe he'd been out cruising for babes.



Come on back, Gnoory.  Tell us more!


I thought you said cabaret!