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Author George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium  (Read 10129169 times)

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Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84210 on: November 17, 2017, 03:15:44 AM »
Are you the female The One?


No, I avoid obscenity and profanity.  And I was nice to awkwilly when he suffered.  And Jackstar's fine.  So, female theOne?  Naw!

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84211 on: November 17, 2017, 03:28:32 AM »
Wishing you all a Happy Thanksgiving. Hope its enjoyable


A snack for you!

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84212 on: November 17, 2017, 03:30:46 AM »
I didn't realize that the doo doo birds helped build the pyramids.  Wow.  That caller was out there.  LOL!  Has that person called in before?
I had not heard that caller before. As far as I'm concerned, he was almost as good as the John Lennon assasination conspiracy guy  8)


Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84213 on: November 17, 2017, 06:01:15 AM »
Wishing you all a Happy Thanksgiving. Hope its enjoyable


"Thank yeeewww, G!  Enjoy your turkee.  We know yeeewww do!"

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84214 on: November 17, 2017, 07:07:44 AM »
LMH on this Tuesday for November.  Meh.  More JFK stuff.  Clyde Lewis put me to sleep last night with this kind of stuff.  It didn't take long.

JFK and UFO
Tuesday - November 21, 2017
Hosted by George Noory
Guest(s): Linda Moulton Howe, Darryl Anka
Investigative reporter Linda Moulton Howe will discuss the release of JFK assassination records; the Watergate break-in; LBJ and long-time employees of the CIA; and Majestic-12 groups involvement of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

In the first hour, UFO researcher and experiencer Darryl Anka will be discussing his two sightings that led to his channeling of the extraterrestrial entity known as ‘’Bashar’’. Darryl will detail his experiences and explain what channeling is, what kind of scientific and metaphysical information Bashar’s messages contain, and how open contact with ETs in the future could impact our society.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84215 on: November 17, 2017, 09:09:13 AM »
Yes.  I play videos on one tab while I view material on another tab!  No sense staring st a still life photo of Wells!

Well, if you said "you had played a video on one tab in the background while viewing material in another", there would be no problem. However, "I listened to a video" is incorrect and not the proper syntax. That's all.

You are off base about Wells being "slow between words and having a lot of pauses". To say he has a relaxing, calm style is one thing, but if you really listened to one of his broadcasts -- not one where he's being interviewed -- you would know he reports stories and gives his editorial comments at a generally fast rate and speaks proper English, unlike another broadcaster i have in mind.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84216 on: November 17, 2017, 09:48:36 AM »
I agree its expensive.  So are doctors. 

Maybe his advice has harmed someone, but i doubt it.  Because i cant find any stats on the percentage of U.S. deaths caused by naturopathic doctors (which Wallach says he is).  On the other hand, allopathic (regular) doctors are the third leading cause of death, and cause 10% of U.S. deaths per. https://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-05-03/medical-errors-are-third-leading-cause-of-death-in-the-us.  Most people dont know that naturopaths go to medical school.

Doc gives a lot of his proprietary info away, if one listens (for free) repeatedly, and takes notes.  His website gives away the "secret" mineral, which I believe is selenium (found in mustard).

Here:
http://nomdforme.com/faq/what-are-the-90-essential-nutrients/. .  I dug them up for free.  If you like this information I found at no charge to you😃, please check out https://www.gofundme.com/dellasdental.

You didn't answer the question about what's true regarding Wallach's claims. I laid out 3 general ones that you simply ignored.

There are no statistics on "naturopathic" doctors because they can't be placed in a scientific study since any person can claim to be "Holistic". In other words, there is no scientific course or graduate body for the field "Naturopahy". It is simply a hobby for those who partake in it.

My argument isn't against "naturopathic" or Holistic Doctors. If it suits you better to see them for your healthcare needs then more power to you. My argument is against "Doc" Wallach specifically and his outlandish claims and untruths he spouts to profit on the gullible, as so many in this thread have also stated for the record.

You should really take a look at: http://skepdic.com/wallach.html .  Here are some excerpts you will find illuminating if you really can independently think and not be blinded by your bias of the medical establishment; which I admit there are malpractice claims and bad doctors a lot of the time -- i don't deny that. But painting every MD with a broad brush is dangerous business in my view.

Here are the excerpts:

The basic danger of Wallach's theories is not that taking colloidal minerals will harm people or even that many people will be wasting their money on a product they do not need. Many of his claims are not backed up by scientific randomized control studies, but are anecdotal or fictional. The basic danger is that because he and other naturopaths exaggerate the role of minerals in good health, they may be totally ignored by the scientific community even if they happen to hit on some real connections between minerals and disease. Furthermore, there is the chance that legitimate scientific researchers may avoid this field for fear of being labeled a kook.

Wallach falsely claims that there are five cultures in the world that have average life spans of between 120 and 140 years: the Tibetans in Western China; the Hunzas in Eastern Pakistan; the Russian Georgians and the Armenians, the Abkhasians, and the Azerbaijanis. He also mentions the people of the Vilcabamba in Ecuador and those who live around Lake Titicaca in Peru and Bolivia. The secret of their longevity is "glacier milk" (water full of colloidal minerals). The basis for these claims seems to be Wallach's imagination.

The label on the "Dead Doctors Don't Lie" tape says "Learn why the average life span of an MD is only 58 years." On his tape, Dr. Wallach claims that "the average life span of an American is 75 years, but the average life span of an American doctor is only 58 years!" Maybe dead doctors don't lie, but this living one certainly does. According to Kevin Kenward of the American Medical Association: "Based on over 210,000 records of deceased physicians, our data indicate the average life-span of a physician is 70.8 years." One wonders where Dr. Wallach got his data. The only mention in his tape of data on physician deaths is in his description of a rather gruesome hobby of his: he collects obituaries of local physicians as he takes his mineral show from town to town.

On his tape, Wallach says

"...what I did was go back to school and become a physician. I finally got a license to kill (laughter), and they allowed me to use everything I had learned in veterinary school about nutrition on my human patients. And to no surprise to me, it worked. I spent 12 years up in Portland, Oregon, in general practice, and it was very fascinating."

Wallach is not a physician, but an N.D., a doctor of naturopathy. It is unlikely that most of the people in his audiences know that naturopaths aren't really physicians and that there is a big difference between an M.D. and an N.D. He also claims he did hundreds of autopsies on humans while working as a veterinarian in St. Louis. How does a veterinarian get to do human autopsies?

"...Well, again, to make a long story short, over a period of some twelve years I did 17,500 autopsies on over 454 species of animals and 3,000 human beings who lived in close proximity to the zoos, and the thing I found out was this: every animal and every human being who dies of natural causes dies of a nutritional deficiency."

If he really did do all those autopsies and then concluded that every animal or human who dies of natural causes dies because of a nutritional deficiency, then he qualifies for the Ignoble or Ignoramus Prize. To accomplish his autopsy feat, he would have to have done six autopsies a day, working 5 days a week for 12 years, taking only a 2-week vacation each year. He was allegedly performing all these autopsies in addition to his other duties and presumably while he was writing essays and books as well.

an attack on doctors and a panegyric to minerals

Wallach's "Dead Doctors Don't Lie" tape is both an attack on the medical profession and a panegyric for minerals. The attack is vicious and mostly unwarranted, which weakens his credibility about the wonders of mineral supplements. He does not come across as an objective, impersonal scientist. He delights in ridiculing "Haavaad" University and cardiologists who die young from heart attacks, many of whom went into the field because of congenital heart defects.

Wallach seems to ignore the importance of genetics in human diseases. He reverts to name-calling on several occasions, as well. Doctors, he says, routinely commit many practices that would be considered illegal in other fields. At one point he claims that the average M.D. makes over $200,000 a year in kickbacks. This ludicrous claim didn't even get a peep of skeptical bewilderment from his audience. [The tape is of a live recording of one of his shows.] He sounds like a bitter, rejected oddball who is getting even with the medical profession for ignoring him and his "research," much of which consists of studies on such things as "hair analysis," a common mark of the quack. His bitterness toward science-based medicine makes Wallach attractive to those with an axe to grind against the medical profession.


-----------------------------

You are wrong about Selenium being the "secret" mineral Wallach talks about. Even Noory on his programs with him sometimes says to listeners that "Wallach will not give away the mineral" when discussing certain ailments the the person is "nutritionally deficient" in.

If you he gives a list of everything as you say -- then why charge the prices he does on his "website store" if everything can be picked up locally at your drug store?

Again, I quote:

Wallach seems to be most famous for a widely circulated audiotape he calls "Dead Doctors Don't Lie." [It is also available in video tape and book form.] The label on the tape notes that Wallach was a Nobel Prize nominee. This is true, but meaningless. He was nominated for a Nobel Prize in medicine by the Association of Eclectic Physicians "for his notable and untiring work with deficiencies of the trace mineral selenium and its relationship to the congenital genesis of Cystic Fibrosis." The Association of Eclectic Physicians is a group of naturopaths founded in 1982 by Edward Alstat and Michael Ancharski. In his book Let's Play Doctor (co-authored with Ma Lan, M.D., M.S.) Wallach states that cystic fibrosis is preventable, is 100% curable in the early stages, can be managed very well in chronic cases, leading to a normal life expectancy (75 years). If these claims were true, he might have won the Prize. He didn't win, but he gave a lot of false hope to parents of children with cystic fibrosis. The fact is that Wallach's "research" on cystic fibrosis was, to put it kindly, incompetent. The "people he studied were self-selected, and not randomized; he did not follow an appropriate data-gathering protocol; his diagnoses were made with a questionnaire; and his report made claims about other data that were either unsupported or unreferenced."* In fact, cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder that "causes the body to produce unusually thick, sticky mucus that:

--Clogs the lungs and leads to life-threatening lung infections.

--Obstructs the pancreas and stops natural enzymes from helping the body break down food and absorb vital nutrients."*

"Many people with the disease can now expect to live into their 30s, 40s and beyond,"* but not because of mineral supplements or thanks to anything Wallach did.


-----

...In the early 1980's, Wallach called himself a "Manner Metabolic Physician'' and treated cancer patients with laetrile, a substance that should not be used to treat cancer. In 1990 he also worked with Kurt Donsbach at the notorious Tijuana clinic Hospital Santa Monica. In 1995, Wallach was using chelation therapy for heart disease, a common misuse of this therapy by quacks. A relative of one of Wallach's patients reported his concerns to the National Council Against Health Fraud when the patient died in Wallach's care. The relative expressed concern that "Wallach had convinced the patient not to be treated by his regular physician; thus he did not seek proper medical help and died."*

There is no scientific data supporting the claim that all diseases are due to mineral deficiencies. A deficiency or excess of zinc can cause serious health problems. Iron deficiency is a well-known health problem. And there is a good reason for magnesium being a common ingredient in laxatives and antacids. But unless one has a specific deficiency, there is no known health benefit from ingesting daily supplements, colloidal or otherwise, unless one considers it a health benefit to feel that you are in control of your well-being by taking supplements. Numerous studies have failed to find any health benefit from taking supplements "just in case" you might be deficient in one or more vitamins or minerals. Editors at the Annals of Internal Medicine put it this way:

Most supplements do not prevent chronic disease or death, their use is not justified, and they should be avoided.... After years of study and mostly disappointing results, enough is enough. What we've found time and again is that the supplements are not working… we don't need to go on studying them forever....most of the 53% of U.S. consumers who use supplements are wasting money, to the tune of $28 billion a year.*

Since one-third of U.S. adults take supplements despite the lack of scientific evidence in support of the practice, characters like Wallach have a large market of eager customers waiting to be told lies that make them feel they can control their health with minimal effort just by opening their mouths and their wallets. The only reputable scientific study I know of that found a "modest" reduction in the risk of cancer from taking daily supplements was published in the Journal of the American Medical Society in 2012. The study involved over 14,000 male physicians over four years. One group got daily multivitamin tabs, the other group got a placebo.

Wallach claims that minerals in foods and most supplements are "metallic" and not as effective as "plant-based" colloidal minerals, which is nonsense because colloidal minerals are also "metallic," i.e., contain trace amounts of aluminum and heavy metals. Being colloidal has more to do with the origin, size, and structure of the mineral particles that with their effectiveness. Being metallic is irrelevant. Wallach claims that metallic minerals (i.e., regular vitamins and minerals) are only 8-12% absorb-able while colloidal minerals are 98% absorb-able. No data support this claim; Wallach seems to have made it up.* (A colloid is "a substance that consists of particles dispersed throughout another substance which are too small for resolution with an ordinary light microscope but are incapable of passing through a semipermeable membrane." --Merriam-Webster)

And probably most important that cannot be overstated:

Wallach makes his claims about minerals despite the fact that in 1993 a research team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia, reported the results of a 13-year study on 10,758 Americans which failed to find any mortality benefits from vitamin and mineral supplements. The study found that even though supplement users smoke and drink less than non-users, eat more fruits and vegetables than non-users, and are more affluent than non-users, they didn't live any longer than non-users. The study also found no benefit from taking vitamin and mineral supplements for smokers, heavy drinkers, or those with chronic diseases.

In May 2006, a committee of physicians impaneled by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced that little information exists as to whether people should take supplements. The previous March the NIH noted that research suggests that vitamins and other supplements may do more harm than good, and that antioxidants are of little use.* Further research has found that vitamin supplements can even be deadly.* The simple fact is that there is no compelling scientific evidence that vitamin or mineral supplements beneficially affect the health or longevity of most people. Those suffering from a vitamin or mineral deficiency should take supplements, but there is no merit to Wallach's claim that most or all diseases are due to mineral deficiencies.

Wallach's basic appeal is to offer hope to people who fear or are mistrustful of medical doctors and scientific knowledge. He gives hope to those who want to live for a really long time. He gives hope to those who are diagnosed with diseases for which current medical knowledge has no cure. He gives hope to those who want to avoid getting a terminal disease. And he gives hope to those who want to be healthy but who do not want to diet or exercise. All we have to do is ingest a magic elixir of colloidal minerals and we'll be healthy. You can't just take your minerals in pill form, he warns us. You must take the colloidal variety in liquid form. Until he had a falling out with T.J. Clark & Co., this elixir had to come from special pits in Utah. After John H. Renner, M.D., President of the National Council Against Health Fraud, exposed the "distortions, bogus science, and outright lies" in Wallach's tape, T.J. Clark & Co. "severed its business relationship with him."  Wallach then "revised his 'scientific' opinion and quickly moved on to find new partners."*


---------

Sorry for the long post, but it was important for this information to get out.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84217 on: November 17, 2017, 10:17:51 AM »


"Thank yeeewww, G!  Enjoy your turkee.  We know yeeewww do!"

Fat Tommee looks like some drug lord in that pic.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84218 on: November 17, 2017, 10:21:50 AM »
Who is paying you!
No one here is complaining about being ripped off by Doc Wallach!

User Here We Go Again has a valid point. Where are the proper disclaimers before each "news show" on the topic of "alternative health" with a guest from the paid sponsor, Criticalheatlhnews? And, Norry occasionally saying (slyly saying I might add) during the program that "we're not saying these are cures" is not a proper disclaimer at all. He says this reluctantly each time, hoping most listeners will not pick it up or be fooled into thinking they are legitimate for claiming this.

No one is complaining about being ripped off by Wallach because everyone on this thread is aware of the fraud that he is! :)

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84219 on: November 17, 2017, 10:29:14 AM »
Fat Tommee looks like some drug lord in that pic.
What a motley crew. Tommee running some kind of human trafficking ring?

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84220 on: November 17, 2017, 10:33:06 AM »
What a motley crew. Tommee running some kind of human trafficking ring?

Lol -- That was my second choice for Tommee's look! More specifically Human sex-child trafficking ring, however i thought that might be too crude... oh well.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84221 on: November 17, 2017, 10:38:18 AM »
Sorry for the long post, but it was important for this information to get out.


massive rolleyes

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84222 on: November 17, 2017, 11:45:48 AM »
What a motley crew. Tommee running some kind of human trafficking ring?
Ha!  Jorch looks like he just came off of a cabernet bender.



Maybe he'd been out cruising for babes.



Come on back, Gnoory.  Tell us more!


Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84223 on: November 17, 2017, 11:56:29 AM »
Ha!  Jorch looks like he just came off of a cabernet bender.



Maybe he'd been out cruising for babes.



Come on back, Gnoory.  Tell us more!


Maybe Tommee stole Art's wife and daughter and that is the reason for the latest quittening? Kidding.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84224 on: November 17, 2017, 01:11:32 PM »
The question is: Who is paying "Coast To Coast AM" for its "medical programs," which are presented as "news, editorial or program matter" when it may not be such. Who is receiving "money, compensation, or anything of value" in exchange for the airing of "editorial matter"? Those are bigger questions. Are they any business ties between Premiere Networks, any and all staff of "Coast To Coast AM" and one "criticalhealthnews(dot)com"? If so, full disclosure must be made, in advance of the broadcasts, to any station and any affiliates airing said broadcasts.

Further, I suggest you review some federal regulations before you declare some snake-oil salesmen to have some "medical truth." The following disclaimers must be aired, but the program and Premiere Networks fails to follow it:

BEGIN QUOTE:<<You must use the following text for the disclaimer, as appropriate:

    singular: "This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease;" or
    plural: "These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease."

You may not modify the wording of these disclaimers.

21 CFR 101.93(c)>>END QUOTE

We fail to hear those disclaimers. And the federal code states the wording is NOT to be modified -- although George Noory thinks it's "OK" to do so. Think again.

You can fall for that scam if you want. There's no crime for people being dumb. But there are laws about broadcasting, mind you, and yes, maybe I once did have professional work and dealt with such issues as mass-media law on a daily basis. I couldn't be so careless as some I hear on radio just might be. You never know, do you?
Dr. Wallach, ND, is a naturopathic doctor who graduated from medical school after his educational internship period.  He is not a snake oil salesman.  He values nutritional health, and in today's age, the value of nutritional health is indisputable.  The program is aired free of charge.  Dr. Wallach does not pay for his on-air programs and he is not paid to perform them. 

The Code of Federal Regulations is for product labeling, not free speech by a doctor!

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/21/1.1

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84225 on: November 17, 2017, 01:13:14 PM »
This is your daily reminder that sodium fluoride is a toxic poison. Where is your FDA on that? Fuck them.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84226 on: November 17, 2017, 03:40:24 PM »
Dr. Wallach, ND, is a naturopathic doctor who graduated from medical school after his educational internship period.  He is not a snake oil salesman.  He values nutritional health, and in today's age, the value of nutritional health is indisputable.  The program is aired free of charge.  Dr. Wallach does not pay for his on-air programs and he is not paid to perform them. 

The Code of Federal Regulations is for product labeling, not free speech by a doctor!

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/21/1.1

Nope. Wallach runs criticalhealthnews dot com. Therefore he's a paid sponsor. Norry says so at beginning of each program when Wallach is on. Therefore he is product labeling each time he is on.

Not only is a snake-oil salesman, he is the proverbial snake himself. Don't be dull about it. Again, your bias is blinding you to the truth!

And, the value of nutritional health in today's age has been disputed over and over again by the scientific community. Which is not to say it has absolutely no value. I'm sure nutritional supplementation does have slight benefits, but Wallach takes it to another level, claiming it can reverse most, if not all, diseases.

He is akin to a sleazy preacher who spouts that he can cure his audience through the power of Jesus... Jesus being special nutrition in Wallach's case.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84227 on: November 17, 2017, 03:53:46 PM »



Come on back, Gnoory.  Tell us more!

"Not too close, honey... yew'll mess up the 'stache,"

So You Know For Sure It's All "Free Of Charge" Programming? How Do You Know?
« Reply #84228 on: November 17, 2017, 04:17:21 PM »
The program is aired free of charge.  Dr. Wallach does not pay for his on-air programs and he is not paid to perform them. 

The Code of Federal Regulations is for product labeling, not free speech by a doctor!

So, you know it's not "paid programming"? That implies you are associated with the program in some way, otherwise you'd never advance that statement. Are you one of its staff? Do you have access to the financial records of Premiere Networks, and of any and all staff members of "Coast To Coast AM" in which "anything of value" is being exchanged?

No one is being paid, huh? I hear that on the program -- how no one involved is making a plug nickel off anything from "criticalhealthnews(dot)com" -- and yet money is going somewhere. Where is it going? I see. It's all being done out of the goodness of these people's hearts? Are you that naive to think that?

OK. If that is so, note how "Coast To Coast AM" has a predicable schedule for that website. Twice a month -- near the beginning and near the end. Almost matching advertising scheduling.  If it's all "free," then tell your producers to suspend such supposed "news, editorial or program matter" programs for at least two months. Why won't they? Um, maybe because they may represent "paid programming" outside of any advertisements? What's the matter? Afraid the paid sponsor will get ticked off and claim they "provide money, compensation and anything of value" that may include these "news" programs? Huh?

By the way, free speech as you cite isn't applicable to "paid programming," unless disclaimers are aired to indicate that. So, under the laws you cite, that makes the programs "news, editorial or program matter" and that makes the case worse for them. That's why the program can say what they want and insult others who disagree -- but if federal agencies can get involved, any such records of financial ties can be found out.

If the program has nothing to hide, then they will welcome and encourage listeners to share any and all concerns with federal agencies for proper investigation. As I'm sure you would, too. Agreed?   


Agreed: And I Tune In To Weekend "Alternative-Heath" Informericals
« Reply #84229 on: November 17, 2017, 04:48:01 PM »
Nope. Wallach runs criticalhealthnews dot com. Therefore he's a paid sponsor. Norry says so at beginning of each program when Wallach is on. Therefore he is product labeling each time he is on.

Agreed. Know I tune into so many "alternative-health" infomercials on weekends for so many radio stations across the country. I study their presentation and learn from that. I listen to them and have no problem with what I hear. Why? Because I hear disclaimers and disclosures aired at the beginning -- sometimes middle -- and at the end of the broadcast. I hear disclosures that what you hear is "paid programming," and that:

"The [following is or the proceeding was] a paid program. The views expressed on the [following or preceding] program is that of the host and guests only. Such views do not necessarily represent that of [the station or network name] and is for informational purposes only. None of what you [hear or heard] is meant to replace consultation with your medical professional. Always consult your medical professional before starting any supplement program."

OK. That means that all these stations are wrong for airing such disclaimers -- including 21 CFR 101.93(c) even on radio programs -- and only "Coast To Coast AM" is right for not airing those? OK. Let them face the legal implications of such negligence. Let them fail to cover the program, Premiere Networks itself and all and any of the roughly 600 affiliates who may fail to air their own disclaimers -- to have a measure of defense against lawsuits.

Agreed. These clowns on that certain overnight program think themselves so "clever" as they walk a very thin line in what they present as "news, editorial, or program matter" when it may be found out what is really, really going on.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84230 on: November 17, 2017, 05:11:35 PM »
And the so-called show host plugs the products.  Jorch isn't exactly an unbiased character in this relationship.  He used to do the same with that Carnivora character. Jorch's Doc Wallet shows sure sound like infomercials, without the usual disclaimers. 


The Youngevity Guests On "Coast": Never Mentioning Possible Dangers
« Reply #84231 on: November 17, 2017, 05:16:57 PM »
By the way, have you ever noted that quack Joel Wallach can tie just about every single condition to some "nutrient or mineral deficiency" caused in the womb? That point, correct me if I'm wrong from what I heard and recorded, is mirrored on the "Coast" program from one Ben Fuchs and one Joanne Conaway?

Ever read the labeling on products that "criticalhealthnews(dot)com" sells? What you never hear on the radio program? Take a look at the fine print. A number of products state: "This product is not to be taken by pregnant or nursing women." Huh? Which is it?

So, let's say some woman calls in that is pregnant, or maybe nursing, and is never warned that a number of products sold by that site may cause birth defects, or affect an infant adversely through breast feeding? But may be hearing these supplements, instead, will benefit an embryo or even an infant?

Excuse me, I read the labels of these products, and some state great a pregnant or nursing women should not take them. Odd how such "totally safe" supplements can cause birth defects? Not so "safe," huh? But you never hear that on the radio program. Great to set up the network, the program and all involved for bogus medical advice and perhaps for a major lawsuit. 

Hey, anything that alters your body chemistry carries risks. You never hear that on the program. Instead, you hear how these people want to become your "medical professional," yet seem to not want to take any of legal responsibility for being "under their care." And how if something is "all natural," it must be good for you. Rubbish.

The worst toxins, poisons, venoms, bacteria, viruses, diseases and plagues are "all natural." That's why we needed to create pharmaceutical drugs to save lives and advance lifespans, for reasons also attributed to things "made by nature." Petroleum oil, for example, is "all natural" and "made by nature." Does that means if we drink it, it's good for us?

The horrific "Black Plague" that killed off half of Europe centuries ago was "all natural." Does that mean we want to return to those days? I see. Do away with such drugs as penicillin from the evil "Big Pharma" and you'll be better off?  These hucksters would have fools think that, as the latter never question what that rubbish they hear the former advance as "medical truth."

Their day is coming, all, when they are called to task for trying to "dance around" wanting all the money people pay them for 'their care," yet want none of the responsibility for negligence or malpractice for any and all damages said "caretakers" may be inflicting on the gullible, ignorant or desperate suckers they prey on like the vultures they are.   

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84232 on: November 17, 2017, 06:10:43 PM »
And the so-called show host plugs the products.  Jorch isn't exactly an unbiased character in this relationship.  He used to do the same with that Carnivora character. Jorch's Doc Wallet shows sure sound like infomercials, without the usual disclaimers. 


i did some research (quick interwebs search) to answer a question that I've had for years: why can't Burkee Water Filters ship to Iowa? The reason is Iowa has some law that any filter for human use needs to be tested by a lab of the state's choosing.

Norry got sorta creepy with tech expert when sex doll robots was brought up. Norry imagined  the robot saying "buy me a Chanel purse." Implying that sex, even between human and robot, entails some kind of financial consideration.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84233 on: November 17, 2017, 11:33:17 PM »
Well, if you said "you had played a video on one tab in the background while viewing material in another", there would be no problem. However, "I listened to a video" is incorrect and not the proper syntax. That's all.

You are off base about Wells being "slow between words and having a lot of pauses". To say he has a relaxing, calm style is one thing, but if you really listened to one of his broadcasts -- not one where he's being interviewed -- you would know he reports stories and gives his editorial comments at a generally fast rate and speaks proper English, unlike another broadcaster i have in mind.
But if i said i watched the video, that would be a false statement!  My eyes weren't even on that tab!

Maybe i just heard Wells when he was tired near the end of shows or something. I agree he has a relaxed style.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84234 on: November 17, 2017, 11:57:55 PM »
But if i said i watched the video, that would be a false statement!  My eyes weren't even on that tab!

Maybe i just heard Wells when he was tired near the end of shows or something. I agree he has a relaxed style.

Ok i can agree with that.

Re: The Youngevity Guests On "Coast": Never Mentioning Possible Dangers
« Reply #84235 on: November 17, 2017, 11:59:56 PM »
By the way, have you ever noted that quack Joel Wallach can tie just about every single condition to some "nutrient or mineral deficiency" caused in the womb? That point, correct me if I'm wrong from what I heard and recorded, is mirrored on the "Coast" program from one Ben Fuchs and one Joanne Conaway?

Ever read the labeling on products that "criticalhealthnews(dot)com" sells? What you never hear on the radio program? Take a look at the fine print. A number of products state: "This product is not to be taken by pregnant or nursing women." Huh? Which is it?

So, let's say some woman calls in that is pregnant, or maybe nursing, and is never warned that a number of products sold by that site may cause birth defects, or affect an infant adversely through breast feeding? But may be hearing these supplements, instead, will benefit an embryo or even an infant?

Excuse me, I read the labels of these products, and some state great a pregnant or nursing women should not take them. Odd how such "totally safe" supplements can cause birth defects? Not so "safe," huh? But you never hear that on the radio program. Great to set up the network, the program and all involved for bogus medical advice and perhaps for a major lawsuit. 

Hey, anything that alters your body chemistry carries risks. You never hear that on the program. Instead, you hear how these people want to become your "medical professional," yet seem to not want to take any of legal responsibility for being "under their care." And how if something is "all natural," it must be good for you. Rubbish.

The worst toxins, poisons, venoms, bacteria, viruses, diseases and plagues are "all natural." That's why we needed to create pharmaceutical drugs to save lives and advance lifespans, for reasons also attributed to things "made by nature." Petroleum oil, for example, is "all natural" and "made by nature." Does that means if we drink it, it's good for us?

The horrific "Black Plague" that killed off half of Europe centuries ago was "all natural." Does that mean we want to return to those days? I see. Do away with such drugs as penicillin from the evil "Big Pharma" and you'll be better off?  These hucksters would have fools think that, as the latter never question what that rubbish they hear the former advance as "medical truth."

Their day is coming, all, when they are called to task for trying to "dance around" wanting all the money people pay them for 'their care," yet want none of the responsibility for negligence or malpractice for any and all damages said "caretakers" may be inflicting on the gullible, ignorant or desperate suckers they prey on like the vultures they are.

All good points.

On Wallach's last program, on 11/8, he claimed homosexuality is "not a choice" and was caused by a "nutritional deficiency of the mother's womb during pregnancy."

How's that for outlandish?

I also looked up treatments for scoliosis, and none involve "hanging someone upside down on an inversion table 3-4 times a day for about 15 minutes each time." I was blown away when i heard him say that.. I can tell even George was somewhat shocked at first, but then quickly went into "whatever you say, Doc!" mode.

The main treatment, without surgery, is fitting a scoliosis patient with a special back brace to prevent further curvature of the spine.

I swear, Wallach will get into major trouble one day spewing this nonsense. And not just Wallach, but C2C as well.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84236 on: November 18, 2017, 12:18:56 AM »
All good points.

On Wallach's last program, on 11/8, he claimed homosexuality is "not a choice" and was caused by a "nutritional deficiency of the mother's womb during pregnancy."

How's that for outlandish?

I also looked up treatments for scoliosis, and none involve "hanging someone upside down on an inversion table 3-4 times a day for about 15 minutes each time." I was blown away when i heard him say that.. I can tell even George was somewhat shocked at first, but then quickly went into "whatever you say, Doc!" mode.

The main treatment, without surgery, is fitting a scoliosis patient with a special back brace to prevent further curvature of the spine.

I swear, Wallach will get into major trouble one day spewing this nonsense. And not just Wallach, but C2C as well.
Scoliolisis worsens over a lifetime in part because of gravity.  So, inversion would help.

If some people are gay because of nutritive conditions in the womb, that would explain why so many families have more than one gay child.  Same mom, same diet.

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84237 on: November 18, 2017, 12:23:54 AM »
i did some research (quick interwebs search) to answer a question that I've had for years: why can't Burkee Water Filters ship to Iowa? The reason is Iowa has some law that any filter for human use needs to be tested by a lab of the state's choosing.

Norry got sorta creepy with tech expert when sex doll robots was brought up. Norry imagined  the robot saying "buy me a Chanel purse." Implying that sex, even between human and robot, entails some kind of financial consideration.
At least he didn't say the robot said, "Time to clean the house!".  That would be even worse!!

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84238 on: November 18, 2017, 12:26:26 AM »
Scoliolisis worsens over a lifetime in part because of gravity.  So, inversion would help.

If some people are gay because of nutritive conditions in the womb, that would explain why so many families have more than one gay child.  Same mom, same diet.

There is no evidence (that i can find) to support that inversion does anything for the patient, other than make them extremely uncomfortable. And, how would it help? Does Wallach claim the spine straigtens itself out while being hung upside down like some lab rat?

Wallach didn't say "some", he implied "all"  homosexuality by saying de facto that "homosexuality is caused by a nutritional deficiency..."

Re: George Noory Sucks! - The Definitive Compendium
« Reply #84239 on: November 18, 2017, 12:29:16 AM »
By the way, have you ever noted that quack Joel Wallach can tie just about every single condition to some "nutrient or mineral deficiency" caused in the womb? That point, correct me if I'm wrong from what I heard and recorded, is mirrored on the "Coast" program from one Ben Fuchs and one Joanne Conaway?

Ever read the labeling on products that "criticalhealthnews(dot)com" sells? What you never hear on the radio program? Take a look at the fine print. A number of products state: "This product is not to be taken by pregnant or nursing women." Huh? Which is it?

So, let's say some woman calls in that is pregnant, or maybe nursing, and is never warned that a number of products sold by that site may cause birth defects, or affect an infant adversely through breast feeding? But may be hearing these supplements, instead, will benefit an embryo or even an infant?

Excuse me, I read the labels of these products, and some state great a pregnant or nursing women should not take them. Odd how such "totally safe" supplements can cause birth defects? Not so "safe," huh? But you never hear that on the radio program. Great to set up the network, the program and all involved for bogus medical advice and perhaps for a major lawsuit. 

Hey, anything that alters your body chemistry carries risks. You never hear that on the program. Instead, you hear how these people want to become your "medical professional," yet seem to not want to take any of legal responsibility for being "under their care." And how if something is "all natural," it must be good for you. Rubbish.

The worst toxins, poisons, venoms, bacteria, viruses, diseases and plagues are "all natural." That's why we needed to create pharmaceutical drugs to save lives and advance lifespans, for reasons also attributed to things "made by nature." Petroleum oil, for example, is "all natural" and "made by nature." Does that means if we drink it, it's good for us?

The horrific "Black Plague" that killed off half of Europe centuries ago was "all natural." Does that mean we want to return to those days? I see. Do away with such drugs as penicillin from the evil "Big Pharma" and you'll be better off?  These hucksters would have fools think that, as the latter never question what that rubbish they hear the former advance as "medical truth."

Their day is coming, all, when they are called to task for trying to "dance around" wanting all the money people pay them for 'their care," yet want none of the responsibility for negligence or malpractice for any and all damages said "caretakers" may be inflicting on the gullible, ignorant or desperate suckers they prey on like the vultures they are.   
Dr. Wallach knows which subtances are harmful to fetuses and nursing children.  He asks women all the time if they are nursing.

Two of the high up administrators of the FDA have publically bemoaned that the agency is a hazard to citizens because it caters to Big Pharma.  Staff there has complained they are expected to alter study results, in favor of Big Pharma

One of the high up administrators insinuated he could be murdered for speaking out.

Hard to trust an agency that outlaws marijuana, but permits THC.  They just want Big Parma to be able to patent THC methods.