Author Topic: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin  (Read 14898 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #60 on: March 19, 2013, 01:59:50 AM »
To hell with that Joseph Stalin wannabe!
Stalin comparisons are the new Hitler comparisons. They're often just as apt.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #61 on: March 19, 2013, 03:34:26 AM »
Before too much admiration is thrown in Putin's direction, it's worth noting he's one half of a mutually exclusive club that ensures he will remain in that position for some time yet. Then there's the small matter of heading state sponsored assassination of political rivals and subversives*. So he's not that far removed from his previous KGB position..


*Subversive in this context is the elimination (murder) of anyone deemed to be a threat to the status quo.


Now if that is to be admired, presumably tyranny is not altogether a bad thing after all.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #62 on: June 21, 2013, 06:53:46 PM »
At this point I would rather have Putin as POTUS. At least he has (or seems to have)a sense of national pride and a love for the Russian People and their culture. Conversely, Obama hates America, its people, capitalism and the US Constitution.


Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #63 on: June 21, 2013, 07:18:02 PM »
At least you dont have to hide your jewelry when Obama is around..


Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #64 on: June 21, 2013, 07:45:47 PM »

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #65 on: June 21, 2013, 10:05:29 PM »
At least you dont have to hide your jewelry when Obama is around..

lol
 
The guy is the team OWNER.  Make yourself another ring already

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #66 on: June 21, 2013, 10:10:26 PM »

lol
 
The guy is the team OWNER.  Make yourself another ring already


So some stealing by the powerful elite is ok? Yeah the guy can probably afford another ring in the same way I can afford another hamburger. But come on if that isn't a dick move then there are no dick moves.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #67 on: June 21, 2013, 10:35:49 PM »
At least you dont have to hide your jewelry when Obama is around..
Well, it was Kraft.


Would have liked to see Putin try to pull that crap with Al Davis.  KGB guards or not, Al would have left with his ring.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #68 on: June 21, 2013, 10:40:17 PM »

 
If that's what really happened - I think there is some dispute about it


Well if Putin admits to it... that would be ballsy.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #69 on: June 21, 2013, 10:46:56 PM »


Would have liked to see Putin try to pull that crap with Al Davis.  KGB guards or not, Al would have left with his ring.
          True. Even if it meant a shallow grave near Chernobyl.

          Actually, Chernobyl would be a better place to play than that sewer the Raiders and A's toil in.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #70 on: June 21, 2013, 10:51:05 PM »
At least you dont have to hide your jewelry when Obama is around..
BwaahaaaaaHAAAAAAHAAAAA!!!




Well if Putin admits to it... that would be ballsy.
Ballsy as hell. Imagine: "Ring was gift. Indeed, much appreciated.....Next move is belonging to you I believe. Or is this what is being called 'Chex Mate'?"

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #71 on: July 10, 2013, 08:54:13 PM »

Conservatives like myself at one time supported Cheney and Bush. We now admit we made a HUGE mistake and realize these a-holes are NWO tools. I wish the Obama-bots would do the same.

Dick Cheney is a bad guy, but he is a boss. Within the Republican party, no one steps up to him, even with his having an ultra-butch, gay daughter. He should technically be in jail, but he isn't and he wrote a book boasting about it. While I don't agree with his neo-conservative foreign policy, I wish he could have focused those talents on tackling domestic problem (except for hunting).

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #72 on: July 10, 2013, 10:14:52 PM »
Conservatives like myself at one time supported Cheney and Bush. We now admit we made a HUGE mistake and realize these a-holes are NWO tools. I wish the Obama-bots would do the same.

Hindsight is 20/20. You supported the administration until the day they left office, and only then argued that they weren't "real conservatives" after all (no true Scotsman), shifting the blame onto someone else.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #73 on: July 11, 2013, 12:51:57 AM »
Free Pussy Riot!!! Putin is SHIT!!1
 

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #74 on: July 11, 2013, 01:24:21 AM »
Hindsight is 20/20. You supported the administration until the day they left office, and only then argued that they weren't "real conservatives" after all (no true Scotsman), shifting the blame onto someone else.
Please, feel free to demonstrate how a noble nature can overcome ideology and mere partisanship. 

Putin the Classic Conservative
« Reply #75 on: December 09, 2013, 03:49:38 PM »
Dedicated to all you right wingers who cherish Putin as a "patriot" who "loves his country".
You couldn't look more stupid today...

http://www.aol.com/article/2013/12/09/putin-dissolves-state-news-agency-tightens-grip-on-russia-media/20784881/?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec1_lnk3%26pLid%3D416893

Top of the Idiot List: Qunt Karl

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #76 on: December 09, 2013, 05:08:19 PM »
Putin has always seemed to be nothing less than a KGB thug who longed to return to a circa 1980 Soviet Union.  He did his time, damnit, and now he deserves to rule things!  I imagine he's one of the most arrogant pricks to know in real life.

Re: Putin the Classic Conservative
« Reply #77 on: December 10, 2013, 01:27:01 AM »
Dedicated to all you right wingers who cherish Putin as a "patriot" who "loves his country".
You couldn't look more stupid today...

http://www.aol.com/article/2013/12/09/putin-dissolves-state-news-agency-tightens-grip-on-russia-media/20784881/?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec1_lnk3%26pLid%3D416893

Top of the Idiot List: Qunt Karl

I've asked elsewhere what the opinion is (even providing links) of the people in Ukraine trying to get their Putin friendly government to steer away from Russian dependent trade and instead join the EU. Question is, as the EU is widely seen as left leaning, what does that say of the Ukrainian protesters' political leanings who knocked down and smashed Lenin's statue in Kiev? So far the right wingers haven't said..funny that.

Re: Putin the Classic Conservative
« Reply #78 on: December 10, 2013, 03:35:25 AM »
I've asked elsewhere what the opinion is (even providing links) of the people in Ukraine trying to get their Putin friendly government to steer away from Russian dependent trade and instead join the EU. Question is, as the EU is widely seen as left leaning, what does that say of the Ukrainian protesters' political leanings who knocked down and smashed Lenin's statue in Kiev? So far the right wingers haven't said..funny that.

Once Obama comments on it... you just have to be patient.

Re: Putin the Classic Conservative
« Reply #79 on: December 10, 2013, 04:34:50 AM »
I've asked elsewhere what the opinion is (even providing links) of the people in Ukraine trying to get their Putin friendly government to steer away from Russian dependent trade and instead join the EU. Question is, as the EU is widely seen as left leaning, what does that say of the Ukrainian protesters' political leanings who knocked down and smashed Lenin's statue in Kiev? So far the right wingers haven't said..funny that.


Well, I responded.  I said it was  mixed bag.  I listed out the pros and cons of 'realpolitik' (working together against terrorism, dealing with China, exploring the Arctic, Nukes, etc).

On the one hand, the people of Ukraine have the right to self determination, and if they wish to look west to Europe they should be able to.  That does not mean the US needs to be involved.  Every time something is going on somewhere in the world, somebody somewhere wants the US to get involved.  We get involved far too often as it is.

On the other hand, the US and Europe have made very grave mistakes in extending NATO right up to Russia's border.  We've meddled in the elections of the former Soviet 'Republic's' of Georgia and Ukraine, and committed lesser provocations within what Russia considers it's sphere of influence.  We cannot continue to provoke Russia.  They are an important country.  It is not in our best interests.  We should be on good terms with them, and need to work toward that.

It's quite possible the Russians originally elected Putin in response to our blundering.  That was a major part of the platforms Putin and Medvedev each ran on and continue to run on.

It is better for world peace, and for Western relations with Russia, that we not continue to provoke them.  The way the EU should probably have handled this was to offer either membership of some form of relationship with Russia first, then to the various Republics. 


If it were me, I'd pursue a better relationship with Russia.  I already listed some of the important mutual interests we should be working on together.  We can wish the Ukrainians well, and even be of assistance after shoring up our relationship with Russia, but there is no reason for the US to get involved with this now.


By the way, I noticed the Ukraine government survived a 'no confidence' vote last week so it isn't clear that the people in the street represent anyone but themselves.  I don't quite understand why it is that people become so mesmerized when protesters take to the streets.  The Tea Party doesn't speak for everyone.  Neither does Occupy.  Or any of the other various protesters.  There have been alternating huge protests in Egypt by 2 different sides.  Why are we to automatically assume these people speak for everyone, or even the majority?  Especially in a country like the Ukraine that has a representative elected government.  Why should the mob decide?  I thought we were all for 'Democracy' - which means voting.  Sometimes 'democracy' is cumbersome and moves slowly.  Let's say the Ukraine accepts EU membership 3 years from now instead on next week.  So what?

Having survived the No Confidence vote, if I were the Ukrainian government, I'd probably put it to a national referendum


The EU should not get all high and mighty on this.  Look how Turkey has been treated by the EU.  They finally said screw it, and turned east toward radical Islam.  Nice going, EU - another friend turned into a potential enemy.   The Europeans enjoy taking shots at the US, I wonder how much race had to do with them denying Turkey EU membership.

Re: Putin the Classic Conservative
« Reply #80 on: December 10, 2013, 05:06:29 AM »
I've asked elsewhere what the opinion is (even providing links) of the people in Ukraine trying to get their Putin friendly government to steer away from Russian dependent trade and instead join the EU. Question is, as the EU is widely seen as left leaning, what does that say of the Ukrainian protesters' political leanings who knocked down and smashed Lenin's statue in Kiev? So far the right wingers haven't said..funny that.


Since you've asked several times about Thailand...  This is a struggle about where development money is going to be spent - in the cities or in the rural areas.  It's none of our business.

The Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and her party (Pheu Thai) have the support of the poorest Thais - mostly rural farmers.  The opposition is made up of the wealthier Thais - mostly living in Bangkok and a few of the larger provincial cities, people that own their own tiny businesses, government employees, the police, the military etc.

The current political minority (city folks) have traditionally held power.  They don't like it that the party of the poor rural Thais now hold power, and have now held power for over a decade.  They've held violent protests multiple times in the past decade to the point where the military removes the government and runs the country until things settle down.  When the coup ends and they hold new elections, the same party has been re-elected.

The Pleu Party was formerly the PPP - People's Power Party, and was originally the TRT - Thai Rak Thai party.  The TRT was led by former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra.  He is the real power behind the current Prime Minister.  She is his sister.

Thaksin has been convicted of corruption, and is now in exile.  He was originally in business and made  fortune in a variety of businesses.  Most of the money was made in the Thai cell phone service and Thai cable TV. 


The ultimate authority in Thailand is the Royal Family, and the King has been a stabilizing modernizing force for decades.  As Thailand moves towards a permanent fully functioning democracy, the military is standing by to step in to keep things from getting out of hand.  When things settle, the government is returned to the politicians.  It sounds chaotic, and has been from time to time, but Thailand has actually been fairly well governed over the years, is peaceful, is developing, and is a strong US ally in a tough neighborhood.  They are fully capable of taking care of their own internal affairs. 

It is beyond me why the US should get involved between 2 parties accused of corruption.  That people are protesting in the streets means little in this case. 


[attachimg=1]

Madame Prime Minister

Re: Putin the Classic Conservative
« Reply #81 on: December 10, 2013, 07:35:20 AM »

Well, I responded.  I said it was  mixed bag.  I listed out the pros and cons of 'realpolitik' (working together against terrorism, dealing with China, exploring the Arctic, Nukes, etc).

On the one hand, the people of Ukraine have the right to self determination, and if they wish to look west to Europe they should be able to.  That does not mean the US needs to be involved.  Every time something is going on somewhere in the world, somebody somewhere wants the US to get involved.  We get involved far too often as it is.



Forget the USA getting involved or not involved; the question was posed to what you think the ideological position is of the Ukrainians who are protesting against their governments closer alliance with Russia. And their clearly hostile (to Russia) action of felling Lenin's statue. According to Rutger, liberalism is a mental disorder, so does that make these protesters liberal, right wing, or what?

Re: Putin the Classic Conservative
« Reply #82 on: December 10, 2013, 07:38:08 AM »

It is beyond me why the US should get involved between 2 parties accused of corruption.  That people are protesting in the streets means little in this case. 


Again; leave US involvement out, I hadn't suggested there should be. Does it make the people liberal or right wing for wanting to determine their destiny? I'm just trying to get clarification as to where your compass lies when it comes to protesting against governments and choosing self determination.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #83 on: December 14, 2013, 11:23:30 PM »
Reagan may have been an alpha male and had amazing foreign policy but he played too much ball with liberals on the matters of domestic policy look at the Hughes amendment to the Firearm Owners Protection Act it's a disgrace to the second amendment and the principals this country was founded on.

Reagan didn't write the Hughes Amendment.

He just signed the approved FOPA bill.  I don't see why he would had vetoed a hard fought for bill because it closed the window on new MG registrations.  Trust me, I'd love to have 922(o) go away.  Don't blame Reagan, he was doing his job.  Blame the house for not halting it when Hughes sneaked in.

Hughes wrote the Amendment.  Charlie Wrangle abused the gavel and chairmanship to let it slide in, despite floor demands for a standing vote.

And you can still buy pre-86 MG's, and they were quite reasonably priced until after 2001 when the internet age really started spreading the info on NFA firearms.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #84 on: February 06, 2014, 07:37:10 PM »
Dedicated to all those right wingers who insisted Putin has "outfoxed" Obama and the Western allies:

 http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/06/russia-journalists-sochi-hotels-sying_n_4739400.html

Sounds like something out of Paper*Boy's playbook.

What a disgrace; Putin has humiliated himself and his nation in front of the whole world.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #85 on: February 06, 2014, 07:44:15 PM »
Some of you wouldn't last a day with Putin in charge, step out of line you be sent to the siberian salt mines.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #86 on: February 07, 2014, 09:01:32 AM »
Some of you wouldn't last a day with Putin in charge, step out of line you be sent to the siberian salt mines.
Or worse, building a hotel in Sochi...

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #87 on: February 07, 2014, 09:10:16 AM »
Not his politics, but at least he puts his own country and people first.  Wish we had a leader that would do that.  Besides, he's a badass.  Our president is definitely not.  Exhibits A and B: Putin vacationing and Obama vacationing.  The only thing missing from Obama's attire is some kneepads and a Spongebob Squarepants backpack.  Damn this country needs a badass nationalist in the worst way.

I never hit the politics thread, but I agree with this as well.   We have a bunch of pansy asses running this country.   We need someone like Eisenhower who knows how to be a bad ass but at the same time understands the dangers of the military industrial complex.    The closest thing to this in the public eye is Christie, but he's just a fat slob who has been outed as corrupt as the rest of them.  I don't know why more people don't listen to Rand Paul. 

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #88 on: February 07, 2014, 11:25:35 AM »
I don't know why more people don't listen to Rand Paul.
Amen.

Re: I have to admit, I admire Vladimir Putin
« Reply #89 on: February 07, 2014, 02:49:08 PM »
Amen.
Because he's nuts.

As to you Putineers; why you've adopted this murdering KGB thug as your icon of nationalism escapes me, but he continues to embarass his nation in front of the world with his half-ass performance at the Olympics:

 http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/07/sochi-olympics-opening_n_4747028.html?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec1_lnk3%26pLid%3D440363

He sucks.  Anyone saying he represents his country better than our President represents ours has not a clue.