Author Topic: Celebrity Deaths  (Read 471125 times)

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Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #600 on: August 25, 2012, 03:02:25 PM »
American hero Neil Armstrong died. I'm sure that nutty Snoory will have some stupid tribute.

I was ready to post a :"no, he just had surgery", but I checked, and I'll be danged. Oh, I hate this. Most of you don't know what it was like to have an astronaut corps whose names you knew, who you thought were heroes. Now we don't even have a space program.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #601 on: August 25, 2012, 03:11:25 PM »
American hero Neil Armstrong died. I'm sure that nutty Snoory will have some stupid tribute.
Consisting of RCH waxing nostalgic about how he knew Armstrong, etc. -- when in reality if RCH ever encountered the guy at all, it was probably from the neck-craning back ranks of a press conference after the Moon mission, while RCH held the place of the actual assigned CBS reporter who had to go to the toilet.

OR -- wait for it-- RCH will come up with something about how Armstrong was silenced because he was about to blow the lid off the cover-up of what they saw on the Moon!!!

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #602 on: August 25, 2012, 03:17:22 PM »

OR -- wait for it-- RCH will come up with something about how Armstrong was silenced because he was about to blow the lid off the cover-up of what they saw on the Moon!!!

If he does, I'll be on a plane to New Mexico the next day.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #603 on: August 25, 2012, 03:29:06 PM »
Astronaut Neil Armstrong, first man to walk on moon, dies at age 82

Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, died Saturday, weeks after heart surgery and days after his 82nd birthday.
His family reported the death at 2:45 p.m. ET. A statement said he died following complications resulting from cardiovascular procedures.





Coincidentally, tonight's scheduled Art Bell classic replay:
6-10pm PT: Art Bell - Somewhere in Time returns to 11/11/02, when Marcus Allen - the publisher of the U.K. edition of Nexus magazine discussed why he no longer believes man went to the Moon.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #604 on: August 25, 2012, 03:57:34 PM »


OR -- wait for it-- RCH will come up with something about how Armstrong was silenced because he was about to blow the lid off the cover-up of what they saw on the Moon!!!
That was the first thing that came to my mind after reading the story.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #605 on: August 25, 2012, 04:08:14 PM »
One interesting thing about sNoory is that he seems able to hold in his mind both the idea that we never went to the moon and that the astronauts who went there are covering something up.  That takes special talent.

I remember well my family gathered around the television to watch both the landing and, later, the moon walk.  It gave us all a sense of pride that I don't think exists anymore.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #606 on: August 25, 2012, 04:39:20 PM »
Quote
One interesting thing about sNoory is that he seems able to hold in his mind both the idea that we never went to the moon and that the astronauts who went there are covering something up.  That takes special talent.

Noory can't hold anything in what passes for his mind. What he 'believes' depends on who he talked to last about the subject.

Quote
I remember well my family gathered around the television to watch both the landing and, later, the moon walk.  It gave us all a sense of pride that I don't think exists anymore.

I was in the service, and remember well watching the landing and walk with my buddies in the TV room. I wonder if we've lost that sense of pride because (geez, I hate to agree with RCH) NASA isn't doing manned missions anymore.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #607 on: August 25, 2012, 04:39:45 PM »
A true American hero. Veteran (naval aviator during Korean War), family man, private man, educated man and a decent human being.

May God Bless Neil Armstrong. He was and will continue to be a National Treasure.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #608 on: August 25, 2012, 05:35:08 PM »
Nothing on the C2C website about Armstrong's death, as of 6:30 PM EDT.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #609 on: August 25, 2012, 05:37:25 PM »
Nothing on the C2C website about Armstrong's death, as of 6:30 PM EDT.
  It's not like John Lear died...

  Or Billy Mumy.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #610 on: August 25, 2012, 05:44:54 PM »
A tear came to my eye as I read Neil Armstrong died. I think he was my first real life hero. Because of him, I learned about how we as a group, could do magnificent things. I learned because of him that great accomplishments were the result of many not one celebrity. I am sad today.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #611 on: August 25, 2012, 06:01:43 PM »
A tear came to my eye as I read Neil Armstrong died. I think he was my first real life hero. Because of him, I learned about how we as a group, could do magnificent things. I learned because of him that great accomplishments were the result of many not one celebrity. I am sad today.
        I say this in all seriousness, "my generation" didn't have heroes like this. I was conceived when Ford was pardoning Nixon, so our view of politicians has been shit from the start, NASA only garnered full attention in the 80's when disasters occurred. It's quite depressing how utterly devoid of heroes we've become, a society so jaded, so cynical. I can't even comprehend how Apollo 11 must have felt. The other major event that third weekend of July, 1969, Chappaquiddick....now that is something I can totally relate to. That's the world I'm used to. Heroism, patriotism...gonzo.

           My generation gets stuck with an Ollie North as a "hero".  :-[

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #612 on: August 25, 2012, 06:12:29 PM »
        I say this in all seriousness, "my generation" didn't have heroes like this. I was conceived when Ford was pardoning Nixon, so our view of politicians has been shit from the start, NASA only garnered full attention in the 80's when disasters occurred. It's quite depressing how utterly devoid of heroes we've become, a society so jaded, so cynical. I can't even comprehend how Apollo 11 must have felt. The other major event that third weekend of July, 1969, Chappaquiddick....now that is something I can totally relate to. That's the world I'm used to. Heroism, patriotism...gonzo.

           My generation gets stuck with an Ollie North as a "hero".  :-[

I'm of a similar age and totally agree. I can't think of any event in my lifetime that would even come close.
 
(thinks for a while)
 
You know who I admire? That guy that got his hand trapped under a rock in the desert and had to cut it off to survive. I think about that guy a lot.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #613 on: August 25, 2012, 09:43:09 PM »
The voice of Sesame Street's The Count

"Puppeteer and voice actor Jerry Nelson may be virtually unknown in the mainstream, but plenty of children (and, yes, some adults) have loved the character he portrayed for many years on PBS' Sesame Street: Count von Count.   Nelson, 78, died Thursday..." (USA Today, 24 Aug)


Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #614 on: August 25, 2012, 10:08:48 PM »
Off-Topic Sarcasm Alert
...Because of [Neil Armstrong] I learned about how we as a group, could do magnificent things. I learned because of him that great accomplishments were the result of many not one celebrity. I am sad today.
Oh, come on Onan!  Don't you know that those early astronauts were all rugged individualists who, in addition to building their own spacecraft (mined the metals, refined the fuels, etc.), had also each singlehandedly discovered and developed aeronautical theory and built their first aircraft and learned to fly NOT by taxpayer-funded military training, but by Nietzschean superhuman will...??   All those crewcut guys you saw working at Houston Center were private-sector employees ("at will," no benefits) directly hired and paid by the hyper-entrepreneurial astronauts out of the profits of their own businesses built up from their multi-million-dollar trust funds they all had since birth!
Collective effort???  Bah!!  Not by god in TODAY'S America!

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #615 on: August 25, 2012, 11:51:28 PM »
we went to see a minor league baseball game tonight.  half expected to see the flag at half mast. it was not.  should've been.  but it wasn't. washington should declare a day this week Neil Armstrong Day and flags everywhere should be at half mast.  if only to remind everyone that hard work and guts are all you need to make the impossible seem achievable

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #616 on: August 26, 2012, 12:17:35 AM »
...washington should declare a day this week Neil Armstrong Day and flags everywhere should be at half mast...
RCH will use the fact that they don't to preach that The Powers That Be are deliberately dishonoring Armstrong to send the message to the remaining astronauts to not talk about what they saw on the Moon. (Ya see, because Armstrong was about to talk, but TPTB silenced him, and are dishonoring him, to chill the others.)  See?  Fifteen years of listening to RCH lets you think that way.


Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #617 on: August 26, 2012, 12:55:28 AM »
Coast finally got around to throwing up a little tribute on the site.  I'm sure Hoagie is salivating all over himself wondering if there were any death-bed confessions.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #618 on: August 26, 2012, 04:39:16 PM »
I sent the following to Punnett and Lisa Lyon:


Ian -
 
I've heard you say that you don't bother to read your email any more, so I'm copying this message to Lisa Lyon in the hopes she can convince you that C2C listeners who don't use Twitter are as deserving of your time and attention as those who do.
 
Your tweet about the soul of Neil Armstrong and the baby of Snooky was offensive and childish, and demeaned the life and passing of a genuine American hero. You should be ashamed of yourself for posting it.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #619 on: August 26, 2012, 04:43:12 PM »
i had a dream last night that hillary clinton had died.  it was such a clear dream that i thought she'd actually died until just a couple hours ago when i checked the news (i woke up at 1:30 this afternoon, lol).

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #620 on: August 26, 2012, 05:20:59 PM »
"They" are covering it up - just like Vince Foster.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #621 on: August 26, 2012, 06:13:10 PM »
i had a dream last night that hillary clinton had died.  it was such a clear dream that i thought she'd actually died until just a couple hours ago when i checked the news (i woke up at 1:30 this afternoon, lol).
Very interesting. I love peoples' dreams.

You do know, however, that if Hillary Clinton passes within the next 48 hours, we're all going to be even more freaked out than we are about the changes to CoastGab.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #622 on: August 27, 2012, 03:46:14 PM »
I sent the following to Punnett and Lisa Lyon:


Ian -
 
I've heard you say that you don't bother to read your email any more, so I'm copying this message to Lisa Lyon in the hopes she can convince you that C2C listeners who don't use Twitter are as deserving of your time and attention as those who do.
 
Your tweet about the soul of Neil Armstrong and the baby of Snooky was offensive and childish, and demeaned the life and passing of a genuine American hero. You should be ashamed of yourself for posting it.

stevesh, what was contained in his tweet re Neil Armstrong? I'm curious.

Sadly, Mr. Armstrong's historic walk on the moon was before my time. It must have been simply amazing to watch the Apollo missions on television. That said, I'm quite frankly perplexed as to how his passing is so low key with so many media outlets.
I suppose the Kardashian sisters garner more interest than this awe-inspiring gentleman and the era he represented?

We are indeed well down the slippery slope.

 
You do know, however, that if Hillary Clinton passes within the next 48 hours, we're all going to be even more freaked out than we are about the changes to CoastGab.

Passes what? A kidney stone? Gas? The butter?  :o




Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #623 on: August 27, 2012, 04:08:50 PM »
Passes what? A kidney stone? Gas? The butter?  :o
I prefer euphemisms when it comes to taking the long dirt nap. That's just me.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #624 on: August 27, 2012, 05:41:34 PM »

That said, I'm quite frankly perplexed as to how his passing is so low key with so many media outlets.
I suppose the Kardashian sisters garner more interest than this awe-inspiring gentleman and the era he represented?

We are indeed well down the slippery slope....

My take is two reasons:
1) America's morale is at the lowest point in almost 75 years. and we can't celebrate anything except a massive and obvious reversal of the direction we're headed; and,
2) Any mention of heroic deeds of Americans of the past embarrasses the irony-drenched, too-cool-for-school, anti-heroic, uber-selfish cynicism which defines our current popular culture.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #625 on: August 27, 2012, 05:44:48 PM »
stevesh, what was contained in his tweet re Neil Armstrong? I'm curious.

"Late yesterday, soul of hero/astronaut Neil Armstrong left his body and passed into Snooki's new baby.#guidosinspace"

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #626 on: August 27, 2012, 05:47:47 PM »
i had a dream last night that hillary clinton had died.  it was such a clear dream that i thought she'd actually died until just a couple hours ago when i checked the news (i woke up at 1:30 this afternoon, lol).

I can imagine your disappointment. 

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #627 on: August 27, 2012, 05:49:26 PM »
Very interesting. I love peoples' dreams.

You do know, however, that if Hillary Clinton passes within the next 48 hours, we're all going to be even more freaked out than we are about the changes to CoastGab.

That would mean that MV is the next Sylvia Brown.  Lol

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #628 on: September 02, 2012, 08:11:03 PM »
Rev. Sun Myung Moon, age 92.  There was a time in the 70s when everyone feared the Moonies would take over everything.   

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #629 on: September 03, 2012, 01:25:44 AM »
Rev. Sun Myung Moon, age 92.  There was a time in the 70s when everyone feared the Moonies would take over everything.

Yep. It seemed like they were at every street corner, offering their flowers for "donations" with the usual come-on, "Would you like to help kids on drugs?". Rev. Moon was a true megalomaniac, and controlled hundreds of millions of dollars in donations. At various times he's claimed to be a second unnamed messiah, or Jesus, or even God himself. What is weirder is that there were always folks who were happy to take his money. He financed a true stinker of a movie, Inchon, which starred Sir Laurence Olivier and Toshiro Mifune (!?). (Moon worshiped Gen Douglas MacArthur and was grateful for his rescue of South Korea from the Communist North.)

The Moonies (the Unification Church) were the predecessors to Scientology as far as how they operated as a cult, and had a semi-divine or fully divine figure at the center of the religion. Also they recruited emotionally stressed or damaged people, or those who because of age or circumstance were easily led/manipulated. Runaways were favorites of the Moonies, but for some reason I recall that they didn't like to recruit junkies/alcoholics, at least active ones. Maybe I'm wrong about that.

The Moonies physically and emotionally isolated the recruits which I don't think Scientology did - somebody check me on that, please. The Moonies had houses where maybe a dozen or even more of them would live together. When they recruited someone they brought him/her into the group home and then isolated them totally from their former lives, including friends and family. The recruits were incapable of voluntary or independent action, such as going outside by themselves, or even using the phone to call family and tell them they were okay. The leaders would give them some excuse, say they would call the family for them, or tell them the families would try to oppress the recruits (beginning the process of destroying the family relationship). The Moonies combined this with "love bombing", where they all constantly kept a happy attitude and would make exaggerated expressions of affection throughout the day to the recruits, even though they hardly knew them. You can see how this would terribly confuse kids or emotionally damaged persons.

The Moonies technically kidnapped recruits, and made it virtually impossible for someone to ever leave. It was because of the Moonies that there were several nationally known "deprogramers" who would be hired by recruits' families to literally re-kidnap their children. Some kids were immediately thankful and said they simply could never get away, although the Moonies were very careful to skirt the law so that it was very difficult to make a criminal case on them. But some recruits were so brainwashed that they were very happy to stay with the Moonies, and the deprogramers would have to more or less hold them prisoner for a week or two to try to bring them back to the real world and prove to them their parents weren't Satanists or child pornographers as the Moonies sometimes falsely charged.

When I was in high school, one night 4-5 Moonies somehow got into our dorm building. Seems like it was 1 guy and 4 girls. Visitors were strictly forbidden, and of course all the guys were just wild to see any girls, but to see them in our dorm rooms at night, that was just a hormone explosion, just to be in their presence. (This was the 70's after all.) The girls looked about 21. They had their flowers and at first wanted to get donations for "kids on drugs". But then they started talking about their great "home" where they lived with all their wonderful, loving friends. They talked about how many beautiful girls lived there with them, although they were very careful not to make any direct sexual reference. They wanted our deprived adolescent minds to make the huge, unjustified jump from "living there" to "orgy", since the Rev. Moon would tolerate no hanky panky. Anyway, life at Moonieville was so super duper wonderful, yadda yadda. The girls were obviously exhausted and had dark circles under their eyes. They weren't dressed warmly enough for the weather. They were undernourished and underweight, but they wouldn't accept any offers of food. It was a standard Moonie tactic to keep them sleep-, calorie- and protein-deprived which made their emotional resistance very low, and made them very pliable and suggestible.

The whole time they had these weird, unreal smiles pasted on their faces. It was like we were watching pod people from Invasion of the Body Snatchers. No real emotion. We were nice and acted interested at first, but then started resisting and asking them tough questions in response. They never got upset or flustered, and didn't change their zoned out smiling faces. We couldn't make them leave when we got tired of it all. They just kept trying to flip some of us. We had to threaten to call the police before they finally left. I heard later they went to a couple of other dorms after ours.

The Moonies and Scientologists are very much alike in their reliance on manipulative techniques, and the fact there was a fraud at the center of the "religion", who had created it for personal financial gain. The biggest difference between Moon and L. Ron Hubbard IMO is that Moon was genuinely insane to some degree; while Hubbard was one of the most outrageous and dishonest con men in world history.