Author Topic: Dynamo Hum & damon  (Read 2490 times)

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Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #60 on: May 10, 2019, 11:53:04 AM »
Oh yes.  Believe me, you guys are only getting the cream.

We need the entire dessert.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #61 on: May 10, 2019, 11:54:09 AM »
You'd have one hell of a phone bill at the end of it.

Well...

I'm worth it.  ;D

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #62 on: May 10, 2019, 12:02:36 PM »
please provide all the context you wish.

1. it doesn't matter that said information was posted by the individual on Facebook. the fact is, you shared personal information with someone that didn't have access or knowledge of said information. also, you suggested/implied that i should take some kind of action using said information.

2. prank calling a live radio show (so everyone is able to hear it) is obviously much different than calling someone's private number to harass them.

unfortunately you thought wrong.


I would love to hear or see the additional "in context" material that Dynamo has if possible.

I know you're not the kind of guy to harass people on their home phones Groyper.


Re: Dynamo Hum & Damon
« Reply #63 on: May 10, 2019, 12:29:04 PM »


Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #64 on: May 10, 2019, 12:32:59 PM »
Any suggestions of biker gangs and/or SWATting?

Re: Dynamo Hum & Damon
« Reply #65 on: May 10, 2019, 12:37:05 PM »
Any suggestions of biker gangs?

Ha! I remember Little Seanís gay outburst.

#goodtimes

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #66 on: May 10, 2019, 04:03:25 PM »
Why not do us some audio books, like pud is going to do with Shredmes great BellGab books.

I'm sure he's recorded some before, which is like adding insult to injury. I distinctly remember someone reciting horrid verses in a disagreeable flat, Everyman kind of accent. I forget what he called the ghastly thing, maybe Childe Heather's Pilgrimage.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #67 on: May 10, 2019, 04:12:12 PM »
We need the entire dessert.

Do we? You are aware that his poetry is banned under the Geneva Convention as 'cruel and unusual punishment '?

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #68 on: May 10, 2019, 06:19:01 PM »
Do we? You are aware that his poetry is banned under the Geneva Convention as 'cruel and unusual punishment '?


And Jazz.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #69 on: May 10, 2019, 08:20:59 PM »
I'm sure he's recorded some before, which is like adding insult to injury. I distinctly remember someone reciting horrid verses in a disagreeable flat, Everyman kind of accent. I forget what he called the ghastly thing, maybe Childe Heather's Pilgrimage.

You must have missed the last Gabcast where mv complimented my voice in terms that still make me blush.  I do wish my accent had more character but linguistically we are an extension of the Midwest without the charm.

At least I am authentic unlike your lot who, sometime in the early 19th century, decided that trying to talk like their French governesses was the height of fashion and haven't been able to say a proper terminal r since then except where it doesn't belong.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #70 on: May 10, 2019, 08:33:40 PM »
Do we? You are aware that his poetry is banned under the Geneva Convention as 'cruel and unusual punishment '?

That's my favorite kind of poetry.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #71 on: May 10, 2019, 08:35:15 PM »
You must have missed the last Gabcast where mv complimented my voice in terms that still make me blush.  I do wish my accent had more character but linguistically we are an extension of the Midwest without the charm.

At least I am authentic unlike your lot who, sometime in the early 19th century, decided that trying to talk like their French governesses was the height of fashion and haven't been able to say a proper terminal r since then except where it doesn't belong.

At least they don't constantly change their dialect, like Heather Wade.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #72 on: May 10, 2019, 09:04:50 PM »
At least they don't constantly change their dialect, like Heather Wade.

I think they do, and quite consciously.  I won't go back over that whole discussion on rhoticity but you may remember Dynamo saying her "rs were off the charts" as a girl.  They're also a lot more likely to pick up slang terms as adults in an effort to sound smart (in the British sense of the word) while we tend to stick with how we spoke as kids (I still say awesome and cool which means you can date my birth within a decade or so) and view adults who try to talk like the kids do as pathetic or, at best, inauthentic.  That's why everyone over there says brill now -- bunch of fucking parrots.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #73 on: May 10, 2019, 09:16:01 PM »
...we tend to stick with how we spoke as kids (I still say awesome and cool which means you can date my birth within a decade or so) and view adults who try to talk like the kids do as pathetic or, at best, inauthentic. 
Interesting take on it. Occasionally, I catch my sister using new slang. Her kids are young- so I'm sure she picked it up honestly. However, I'm sure the look on my face when she says "____" probably says "WTF are you thinking?"

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #74 on: May 10, 2019, 09:25:47 PM »
I think they do, and quite consciously.  I won't go back over that whole discussion on rhoticity but you may remember Dynamo saying her "rs were off the charts" as a girl.  They're also a lot more likely to pick up slang terms as adults in an effort to sound smart (in the British sense of the word) while we tend to stick with how we spoke as kids (I still say awesome and cool which means you can date my birth within a decade or so) and view adults who try to talk like the kids do as pathetic or, at best, inauthentic.  That's why everyone over there says brill now -- bunch of fucking parrots.
They have classes to folks to lose their native accents since accents are still tied to class and can be a detriment in business etc. Though this is changing somewhat where even the BBC seems to go to great lengths to get other types talking and on air. With the whole social movements, immigrants, Muslim invasion, and wanting to be inclusive. I think many can do it consciously but also randomly/unconciously depending on situation. I knew some Glaswegians who could talk pretty much normal, albeit a bit broad, English but could also slip into an almost incomprehensible Glaswegian at a pub or talking to the factory crowd. Likewise a Scouser who could speak normally but then, for fun or when back home, go back into that Liverpool dialect. Similarly I've known some Indians and Paki who, at home, speak like a stereotype "accented English" to parents but normally speaking English as any American (one who on demand can pull it off for fun and we ask him to do it sometimes, the other does it unconsciously and cannot pull it off if asked. Weird.) Hillary and some other politicians here also can adopt accents and dialects seeming at will, depending on audience and location.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #75 on: May 10, 2019, 09:41:21 PM »
I think they do, and quite consciously.  I won't go back over that whole discussion on rhoticity but you may remember Dynamo saying her "rs were off the charts" as a girl.  They're also a lot more likely to pick up slang terms as adults in an effort to sound smart (in the British sense of the word) while we tend to stick with how we spoke as kids (I still say awesome and cool which means you can date my birth within a decade or so) and view adults who try to talk like the kids do as pathetic or, at best, inauthentic.  That's why everyone over there says brill now -- bunch of fucking parrots.

Brits pick up and discard neologisms a lot because it's a living language not something out of a museum. Look at the way people spoke in 18th century England where lower class Londoners spoke something called Cant or Flash where words would go in and out of fashion in an instant. I haven't heard anyone say brill for decades. Brits, regardless of education, have a playful relationship with words.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #76 on: May 10, 2019, 09:42:32 PM »
Brits pick up and discard neologisms a lot because it's a living language not something out of a museum. Look at the way people spoke in 18th century England where lower class Londoners spoke something called Cant or Flash where words would go in and out of fashion in an instant. I haven't heard anyone say brill for decades. Brits, regardless of education, have a playful relationship with words.
I thought "Cant" was Gypsy/Irish-traveler/Tinker language?

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #77 on: May 10, 2019, 09:49:06 PM »
Brits pick up and discard neologisms a lot because it's a living language not something out of a museum. Look at the way people spoke in 18th century England where lower class Londoners spoke something called Cant or Flash where words would go in and out of fashion in an instant. I haven't heard anyone say brill for decades. Brits, regardless of education, have a playful relationship with words.

Except it isn't just play; it's an effort to convey an identity, often aspirational.  Come on, you know how language works.  It's like clothes.  My point was that we are more likely than you to be buried in our first suit, and to see that as a virtue.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #78 on: May 10, 2019, 09:59:07 PM »
I thought "Cant" was Gypsy/Irish-traveler/Tinker language?

No, it was very popular in Georgian England, usually among criminals to keep ahead of the police.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #79 on: May 10, 2019, 10:04:43 PM »
You're right, I was mistaken.  It was brilliant (the red) that shot up recently, not brill.


Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #80 on: May 10, 2019, 10:07:30 PM »
You're right, I was mistaken.  It was brilliant (the red) that shot up recently, not brill.



I'll take a screen shot for posterity.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #81 on: May 10, 2019, 10:10:02 PM »
I'll take a screen shot for posterity.

Do you want a sonnet to commemorate?

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #82 on: May 10, 2019, 10:11:33 PM »
Except it isn't just play; it's an effort to convey an identity, often aspirational.  Come on, you know how language works.  It's like clothes.  My point was that we are more likely than you to be buried in our first suit, and to see that as a virtue.

Accent is aspirational, language is more about use value, the same way we take the cuisine from different countries and use it as our own. Americans get sniffy and call it cultural appropriation but it's merely practical.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #83 on: May 10, 2019, 10:14:27 PM »
No, it was very popular in Georgian England, usually among criminals to keep ahead of the police.
A quick internet search says that I'm also right (you could be correct about the Georgian days usage but I wonder if then also if Cant used primarily by the various Irish types to avoid police as they have often been historically a subversive and criminal lot.) But Cant still used by Irish-travelers/Gypsies/Tinkers (the non-Roma Gypsies who, of course, have their own language and dialect to talk in secret etc.)

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #84 on: May 10, 2019, 10:15:51 PM »
Do you want a sonnet to commemorate?

Let me put it this way. No.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #85 on: May 10, 2019, 10:19:15 PM »
A quick internet search says that I'm also right (you could be correct about the Georgian days usage but I wonder if then also if Cant used primarily by the various Irish types to avoid police as they have often been historically a subversive and criminal lot.) But Cant still used by Irish-travelers/Gypsies/Tinkers (the non-Roma Gypsies who, of course, have their own language and dialect to talk in secret etc.)

Here's what I mean:

http://www.pascalbonenfant.com/18c/cant/

https://www.amazon.com/Cant-Gentlemans-Language-Rogues-Georgian/dp/0992492203

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #86 on: May 10, 2019, 10:33:21 PM »
Here's what I mean:

http://www.pascalbonenfant.com/18c/cant/

https://www.amazon.com/Cant-Gentlemans-Language-Rogues-Georgian/dp/0992492203
Excellent! Thanks. Some great stuff. I am going to personally going to try to use some of these terms. "Frog's Wine" to mean gin or genever, for example, because awesome- both in the term and the amazing ability of the English to disparage other countries- and get them wrong- since gin/genever being originally from the Netherlands and Low Countries not France.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #87 on: May 10, 2019, 10:49:36 PM »
Excellent! Thanks. Some great stuff. I am going to personally going to try to use some of these terms. "Frog's Wine" to mean gin or genever, for example, because awesome- both in the term and the amazing ability of the English to disparage other countries- and get them wrong- since gin/genever being originally from the Netherlands and Low Countries not France.

It was also called Hollands at one time. Dickens sometimes used it.

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #88 on: May 10, 2019, 11:02:44 PM »
You must have missed the last Gabcast where mv complimented my voice in terms that still make me blush.  I do wish my accent had more character but linguistically we are an extension of the Midwest without the charm.


Awwwww..................   

Just for you K_Dubb.  Carl Gratiot at his East Side finest!

https://wfgr.com/learn-the-michigan-accent-the-funny-way-video/

Re: Dynamo Hum & damon
« Reply #89 on: May 10, 2019, 11:03:54 PM »
Accent is aspirational, language is more about use value, the same way we take the cuisine from different countries and use it as our own. Americans get sniffy and call it cultural appropriation but it's merely practical.

I will wrangle with you over this because it is a bugbear of mine.  Language, in the narrow  sense of word choice, serves exactly the same function.  Here is another example (I've already griped about umami and tsunami):  Viking must now be Norse when talking about settlements in North America since the original word connoted piracy and the women and children they took with were not, as far as we know, engaged in piracy (forgetting about Alfhild the famous female Viking).  This dictate came from a well-known academic I think at the museum in Oslo and has radiated throughout the literature.  You can tell how close or current someone is on the subject by which word they employ, i. e. it is a shibboleth.

I think it's silly; I don't think there is any added use value in the term since everyone knows the meaning of Viking that has prevailed for the past century and you always have to explain that "Norse" means people besides Norwegians.  Since I refuse to submit you could conclude that I am not current on the subject (not as current as I'd like to be) or you could say (quite accurately) that I am culturally regressive but, either way, I have conveyed something about my identity.  And, similarly, a person using "Norse" conveys something about his.

edit: forgive me, the dictate came from Birgitta Wallace https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birgitta_Wallace