Author Topic: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop  (Read 3884 times)

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Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #60 on: May 15, 2019, 05:22:45 PM »
I found a site that baked three loaves using three different types of brewer's yeast and one with dried bread yeast. Now I'm even more intrigued. Thanks, Sredni. This was one of the conclusions:

"The loaf made with the bread yeast (the Control Loaf), while still tasty, was the least interesting of the four loaves. Sorry, bread yeast.  I can absolutely Quit You".



https://pastrychefonline.com/baking-with-brewers-yeast/

That matches my impressions. The bread yeast is fine but it doesn't have the zing of brewer's yeast. It tastes flat to me and it's only worth eating when it's still warm. When it cools down you might as well be eating something from the store. I think the brewer's yeast holds the flavour in better somehow.

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #61 on: May 15, 2019, 05:53:22 PM »
No, not for sweet bread. Those methods I mentioned impart a very light sourdough flavor. I wouldn't think the flavors would compliment each other. Well...maybe. Next time you make one of your sweet breads, cut off a tiny piece and try the overnight method with it.

Ah so it is a sourdough-type flavor!  I was never clear what people were talking about when they said it was more flavorful.  Thanks!

I have seen somebody's grandma's recipe that calls for leaving the julekake dough in the garage overnight, but I suspect that has more to do with saving yourself getting up early Christmas morning.  I think panettone usually has a long, cold rise, though, so it would be worth a shot.

Quote
I'm listening to it right now for the first time. It's really quite lovely.

I'm glad you like it.  It is the Israeli national anthem.

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #62 on: May 15, 2019, 06:01:11 PM »
That matches my impressions. The bread yeast is fine but it doesn't have the zing of brewer's yeast. It tastes flat to me and it's only worth eating when it's still warm. When it cools down you might as well be eating something from the store. I think the brewer's yeast holds the flavour in better somehow.

Good grief, there is lager yeast, ale yeast, probably Speckled Hen and Ye Olde Turducken -- we must be beer snobs in addition to bakers?



I ordered some lager yeast.


Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #63 on: May 15, 2019, 06:31:33 PM »
Good grief, there is lager yeast, ale yeast, probably Speckled Hen and Ye Olde Turducken -- we must be beer snobs in addition to bakers?



I ordered some lager yeast.
You would. "Now I noticed this an alcoholic lager beer."  ;)   That is the weird thing. Beer/Ale in UK is relatively weak compared to "Continental Lagers" or "exports" but good.  But considering they drink all day and night, now with these new all-day opening hours, this could be a good thing.

 




You heading out in two days??!? 

https://www.17thofmay.org/event/entertainment-at-bergen-place/ 

https://www.17thofmay.org/ 






Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #64 on: May 15, 2019, 06:32:27 PM »
That matches my impressions. The bread yeast is fine but it doesn't have the zing of brewer's yeast. It tastes flat to me and it's only worth eating when it's still warm. When it cools down you might as well be eating something from the store. I think the brewer's yeast holds the flavour in better somehow.
I find with a long rise (3-4 hours first rise, 2-3 second, and final rise after shaping) bread yeast still provides a bit of tang.  With a quick rise it is rather bland.

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #65 on: May 15, 2019, 06:44:40 PM »

You heading out in two days??!? 

https://www.17thofmay.org/event/entertainment-at-bergen-place/ 

https://www.17thofmay.org/

Yes the ladies will be wearing plastic ponchos over their fancy clothes, though.  I have a hat, though, and when it rains it picks up a very stylish slouch instead of looking like an Amish.

It sucks, though, now that Olsen's Delicatessen is gone; there's nobody selling pølse med lompe on the sidewalk.

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #66 on: May 15, 2019, 06:52:44 PM »
Yes the ladies will be wearing plastic ponchos over their fancy clothes, though.  I have a hat, though, and when it rains it picks up a very stylish slouch instead of looking like an Amish.

It sucks, though, now that Olsen's Delicatessen is gone; there's nobody selling pølse med lompe on the sidewalk.
Sounds like an opportunity! Hardly one up to your baking, confectionery, or literary pursuits but still could be easy and make some kroner! And one you could likely outsource much of to the homeless or illegal population! "Sausage wraps? are, basically, the easiest prepared item in the world.

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #67 on: May 15, 2019, 06:56:15 PM »
Is this the new bellahaven thread?

yes. get out.



Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #68 on: May 15, 2019, 07:19:11 PM »
Sounds like an opportunity! Hardly one up to your baking, confectionery, or literary pursuits but still could be easy and make some kroner! And one you could likely outsource much of to the homeless or illegal population! "Sausage wraps? are, basically, the easiest prepared item in the world.

<<< Would you buy a sausage from this man?

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #69 on: May 15, 2019, 07:36:11 PM »
<<< Would you buy a sausage from this man?
I eat at taco trucks sometimes. Or from suspect vendors at music festivals or carnivals.  To various effects, usually later, so ok. But I think it also helps keep my system strong, like a vaccine, if you will. Or, sometimes, as a very cheap system-purging process, which is also advocated by some medical "experts."

As I mentioned: 

"you could likely outsource much of to the homeless or illegal population"

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #70 on: May 15, 2019, 07:40:53 PM »
I eat at taco trucks sometimes. Or from suspect vendors at music festivals or carnivals.  To various effects, usually later, so ok. But I think it also helps keep my system strong, like a vaccine, if you will. Or, sometimes, as a very cheap system-purging process, which is also advocated by some medical "experts."

As I mentioned: 

"you could likely outsource much of to the homeless or illegal population"

Hahaa that's just what I need on my resume a fly-by-night lompe operation

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #71 on: May 15, 2019, 07:50:36 PM »
Hahaa that's just what I need on my resume a fly-by-night lompe operation
I noticed this prominently positioned today in my local "Half-Price Books" store today. Timing for this weekend? Or just due to Game of Thrones, Vikings, and the various Marvel comic movies like Thor? Idk. I did not buy. Since the "retold" aspect and wondering about the translations, if 'adopted' to modern ears and sensibilities, etc. But her references were from good, old translations. Hollander, Byock, Magnusson, etc so maybe ok? I might pick-up, especially when 'used' at least for the collection.


https://www.amazon.com/Viking-Myths-Sagas-Retold-Ancient/dp/0785835555/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=viking+myths&qid=1557967611&s=gateway&sr=8-2   
 
ps: I will note that store did not have a copy of Anabasis or much Ancient Greek stuff- at all, which was the reason I was going. But lots of Viking stuff. We are winning! Albeit due to Hollywood and comic book rehashings. 

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #72 on: May 15, 2019, 08:16:08 PM »
I noticed this prominently positioned today in my local "Half-Price Books" store today. Timing for this weekend? Or just due to Game of Thrones, Vikings, and the various Marvel comic movies like Thor? Idk. I did not buy. Since the "retold" aspect and wondering about the translations, if 'adopted' to modern ears and sensibilities, etc. But her references were from good, old translations. Hollander, Byock, Magnusson, etc so maybe ok? I might pick-up, especially when 'used' at least for the collection.


https://www.amazon.com/Viking-Myths-Sagas-Retold-Ancient/dp/0785835555/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=viking+myths&qid=1557967611&s=gateway&sr=8-2   
 
ps: I will note that store did not have a copy of Anabasis or much Ancient Greek stuff- at all, which was the reason I was going. But lots of Viking stuff. We are winning! Albeit due to Hollywood and comic book rehashings.

I read the first little bit in preview and it has the eagle Odin "spilling' the mead of poetry to get away.  In reality he shits it ("at hann sendi aftr suman mjöðinn" - sent some behind him) and this is the mead of which bad poets (skaldfifla) partake hahaha.  She has his droppings as "the liquid seeds from which all great stories are born." On those grounds I'd say it's bowdlerized and not exactly accurate.

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #73 on: May 15, 2019, 08:27:28 PM »
I read the first little bit in preview and it has the eagle Odin "spilling' the mead of poetry to get away.  In reality he shits it, and this is the mead of which bad poets partake hahaha.  On those grounds I'd say it's bowdlerized.
Yeah but I think, in some cases, bowdlerization is appropriate. Sometimes if even makes it more funny since, depending on one's age/experience, you "get" the idea but younger folks, or those with sensitive sensibilities, won't. But this is not a "spilling of his seed" situation,  the various ravages, etc in books, myths, Bible, etc that children might not understand, but some scatological humor that would appeal easily to children and a central part of the story, so I'm "agin it."

Depending on how/what, I considering it like directors 'alluding' to some actions but censor or society wouldn't let it be full on porn or graphic death as movies do today. In some cases nuance can be more dramatic even.  But I get your general point. 

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #74 on: May 18, 2019, 12:37:32 AM »


I made a couple things early this morning for our lunch: sweet cardamom buns with currants (both zante and dried blackcurrants) and citron with Shreddie's favorite brown cheese (hveteboller med gjetost), and a famous Norwegian cake called (with characteristic modesty) the World's Best Cake (verdensbestekake) or Kvæfjord Cake after the town way up north where it got its start.  I don't know if it's the world's best but it's good and simple to make:  a buttery sheet cake spread thin over parchment and topped with meringue and sliced almonds, sandwiching a filling of rum-flavored pastry cream lightened with a little whipped (Diplomat Cream).  The effect is greater than the sum of its parts, resembling a fancy airy cream-filled pastry.  I put cardamom in the cake and almond flavor in the meringue to make it a little more complex.


Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #75 on: May 18, 2019, 11:48:29 AM »
The longer it takes for your dough to rise the more flavor it will have due to fermentation.

I have a recipe (available online) for no-knead bread baked in a dutch oven.  Flour, water, yeast, and salt.  The water content is higher than normal.  This is useful later in the process as a source of water for local vapor and a crispy outer crust.  The yeast is only 1/4 of a teaspoon.  Mixed until just combined, and set in a 'warm place" for x number of hours.  In a normal part of the world, this might be 16 hours, which is what it took in the usa.  Here in the Philippines, where 38C is a typical day at this time of year, six hours is more the norm.

The reason I mention all this is because of Ros's comment above.  When the dough rises close to action time, it is fragrant as fuck.  Lift up the towel and drink in the fermented goodness.  And this ends up in the taste of the finished project.

Some influencers have claimed to throw the dough in the fridge after the first rising, and let it sit for two or three days.  And they say the results are worth it.  Can't confirm this from personal experience.

As to buttermilk, you might as well look for powdered unicorn penis as to look for buttermilk in this country.  However, powdered buttermilk is available.  It tastes like powdered buttermilk, but surprisingly, that tastes better than vinegar or lemon.  I made some sweet, sweet cornbread here using powdered buttermilk and a bootleg of two online recipes.  Ever bake cornbread in bacon grease in a skillet?  That's the southern way. 

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #76 on: May 19, 2019, 10:29:08 PM »
Is anyone interested in sugar art? I have used fondant, gumpaste, candy clay, modeling chocolate, and marzipan to decorate cakes.

Here's the first wedding cake I made. Simple vanilla/yellow cake with buttercream frosting and fruit filling. The roses were a basic swirl style, simple heart cut outs, quilted design on the sides with 'pearl' nonpereils.


Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #77 on: May 19, 2019, 10:34:59 PM »
Is anyone interested in sugar art? I have used fondant, gumpaste, candy clay, modeling chocolate, and marzipan to decorate cakes.

Here's the first wedding cake I made. Simple vanilla/yellow cake with buttercream frosting and fruit filling. The roses were a basic swirl style, simple heart cut outs, quilted design on the sides with 'pearl' nonpereils.



That is gorgeous, pye; looks like it should be in a shop window.

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #78 on: May 19, 2019, 10:42:07 PM »
That is gorgeous, pye; looks like it should be in a shop window.

Thank-you, K_Dubb- missed you sweetie. I did it on short notice for a neighbor. I was so new and just learning the basic Wilton techniques. Who knew how difficult it was to smooth buttercream frosting! I made the decorations in a day or two, did my baking the day before because it was only a two tier cake, but was up all night trying to smooth the darn thing out enough and decorate. I was exhausted, but delivered it on time to the venue, the couple loved it. I was relieved and tired.  :)

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #79 on: May 19, 2019, 10:56:24 PM »
Thank-you, K_Dubb- missed you sweetie. I did it on short notice for a neighbor. I was so new and just learning the basic Wilton techniques. Who knew how difficult it was to smooth buttercream frosting! I made the decorations in a day or two, did my baking the day before because it was only a two tier cake, but was up all night trying to smooth the darn thing out enough and decorate. I was exhausted, but delivered it on time to the venue, the couple loved it. I was relieved and tired.  :)

Missed you too; was hoping you'd show up here.  That was awfully brave of you.  They always make it look so easy with their little spinning stands and scrapey tools.  I have not progressed beyond rolling marzipan thin and flat and praying it stays in one piece when I put it on.

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #80 on: May 19, 2019, 11:32:34 PM »
Missed you too; was hoping you'd show up here.  That was awfully brave of you.  They always make it look so easy with their little spinning stands and scrapey tools.  I have not progressed beyond rolling marzipan thin and flat and praying it stays in one piece when I put it on.

There are several techniques for smoothing the frosting and the texture is important. I like the Viva paper towel method. Viva paper towels have a smooth finish for this application. You do a thin crumb coat first and let it set. Then you frost the cake, smoothing as well as you can. Let it set (dry) then place the paper towel to the sides and use a smoothing tool to gently 'iron' the frosting. then do the same with the top.

Marzipan is not my favorite material to work with. It is too soft and sticky for me to work with. I did my very first cake using that for my figures with totally cringe worthy results. There's a whole story about it that I may share in the future.  ;D 

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #81 on: May 19, 2019, 11:56:45 PM »
There are several techniques for smoothing the frosting and the texture is important. I like the Viva paper towel method. Viva paper towels have a smooth finish for this application. You do a thin crumb coat first and let it set. Then you frost the cake, smoothing as well as you can. Let it set (dry) then place the paper towel to the sides and use a smoothing tool to gently 'iron' the frosting. then do the same with the top.

Marzipan is not my favorite material to work with. It is too soft and sticky for me to work with. I did my very first cake using that for my figures with totally cringe worthy results. There's a whole story about it that I may share in the future.  ;D

Ok that is smart; I'm doing that next time.  I usually make a marzipan cake for my mom's birthday and there is a layer of buttercream under I always fight with.

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #82 on: May 20, 2019, 12:02:22 AM »
there is a layer of buttercream under I always fight with


Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #83 on: May 20, 2019, 12:30:40 AM »

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #84 on: May 20, 2019, 10:19:07 AM »
Is anyone interested in sugar art? I have used fondant, gumpaste, candy clay, modeling chocolate, and marzipan to decorate cakes.

Here's the first wedding cake I made. Simple vanilla/yellow cake with buttercream frosting and fruit filling. The roses were a basic swirl style, simple heart cut outs, quilted design on the sides with 'pearl' nonpereils.



I forgot you were valedictorian at the Third Reich Baking School (Der DritteReichGebackSchule). Who were the happy couple? Adolf and Eva?

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #85 on: May 20, 2019, 10:37:42 AM »
I forgot you were valedictorian at the Third Reich Baking School (Der DritteReichGebackSchule). Who were the happy couple? Adolf and Eva?

Actually, it was for Neville Chamberlain. He drove a hard bargain and there was just no pleasing that guy!

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #86 on: May 20, 2019, 10:40:04 AM »
That is gorgeous, pye; looks like it should be in a shop window.

It probably was.

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #87 on: May 20, 2019, 10:57:43 AM »
It probably was.

You did not see fit to comment on my cake, I notice.  Here, I'll help:  it looks like giant grilled cheese sandwich.

I'm going to make your seed cake and ordered a tall springform pan from over there for it.  You guys seem to favor taller cakes, which are trickier to bake as the center is more insulated.  But I want it to look English.

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #88 on: May 20, 2019, 11:15:51 AM »
You did not see fit to comment on my cake, I notice.  Here, I'll help:  it looks like giant grilled cheese sandwich.

I'm going to make your seed cake and ordered a tall springform pan from over there for it.  You guys seem to favor taller cakes, which are trickier to bake as the center is more insulated.  But I want it to look English.

Blimey, touchy touchee. Actually. It reminds me of those cheese cakes that come from Japan. There is a video somewhere of them taking them out of the oven and slicing them. I was mesmerised. I can't recall having had anything like that, it looked good.

Are you going the full Monty and using ten eggs?

Re: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #89 on: May 20, 2019, 11:18:35 AM »
K_Dubb- you are so sweet. Cake decorating was just a hobby/new form of creative outlet for me. My cakes were only enjoyed by family and friends. I was a member of a forum dedicated to bakers that ranged from amateurs, like myself, to those appearing on TV and professional competitors. It has been so long that I don't even know if it still exists. They would critique our photos and help us improve our work.

If you think SV really deserves a cake and you want to go the traditional route- I hope this helps. Happy baking.

http://cake-geek.com/index.php/piping-techniques-piping-drop-strings/