Author Topic: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop  (Read 8159 times)

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Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #391 on: August 30, 2019, 01:44:14 AM »
See. This is where I always go wrong. When you posted "chill to pastry case temperature and eat right away," I had assumed you meant eat the WHOLE thing right away.

Now I find that eating two pieces is sufficient. Good to have clarification before this weekend.  ;)

Oh thank God you clarified -- that's over half a pound of butter!  Poor Shreddie's gall bladder might have exploded leading to a long, slow, bilious demise.

Drat I forgot to say to grease the pan, too.  I am a horrible recipe-writer.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #392 on: August 30, 2019, 02:33:23 AM »


When that is done well, with a proper egg overlap and one swipe of a super-sharp blade, the unfolding of the egg mixture is a thing to behold.


Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #393 on: August 31, 2019, 05:07:36 AM »
No one gives a shit what you think, or even if you do.
Sometimes I pay attention, in a wary kind of way.


Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #394 on: August 31, 2019, 05:08:24 AM »
Oh thank God you clarified -- that's over half a pound of butter!  Poor Shreddie's gall bladder might have exploded leading to a long, slow, bilious demise.

Drat I forgot to say to grease the pan, too.  I am a horrible recipe-writer.
I heard you're just busy, with your new gf.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #395 on: August 31, 2019, 09:31:04 AM »
I heard you're just busy, with your new gf.

Nah her husband is a real cockblocker.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #396 on: August 31, 2019, 10:46:36 PM »
If you have access to a good variety of fresh apples you can make your own applesauce. It has been years since I've made any, but there are simple recipes online. You can adjust them to your taste and I'll bet they are better than Motts. I have even seen people adding cinnamon heart candy- yeah, you could but I wouldn't.

https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/applesauce/

Made this recipe today.  A bit tedious cutting up the apples, but besides that it was super easy.  As luck would have it, the taste was exactly what I was looking for without any adjustment.  Just lightly savory.  Its going to be perfect with the pork chop recipe that I found. 



I used 1.25kg of processed (cut up and peeled) Granny Smith apples, which yielded 1.5 litres of applesauce.  I would not make any changes to this recipe, but for someone who likes it sweet, additional sugar would be required, or perhaps a different variety of apple.

The finished product:



Half of this is going to the oldsters, who have never even heard of it, much less eaten it.  They are in for a treat.  Also made cranberry-almond cookies.

Combine 1/2 cup coconut oil, 1/2 cup white sugar, 1/4 cup brown sugar, 2 eggs, and 1 tsp almond extract in a bowl and whisk until combined:



Yeah, four eggs there.  I made a double batch because I have a lot of mouths to feed.

Sift in 1 1/2 cups of flour, 1/2 tsp baking soda, 1/2 tsp baking powder



Use a spatula to combine.  It's going to be thick and sticky.



Stir gently and fold until well combined.



Then add 1/2 cut oats, 1/2 cup dried cranberries, and 1/2 cup sliced almonds.



It's going to be a challenge to get the inclusions distributed uniformly, but keep at it.



I used an ice cream scoop to lay it out on parchment paper on a baking sheet.  The cookies did not flatten out much during the cooking (the dough is very thick).  Would benefit from being pushed down before baking.  Recipe called for 180C/350F for 20-22 mins.  The first batch was baked for 20 minutes and was too dry.  The second went for 18 min and was still a bit too dry.  I think next time I will use 16-17 minutes.  My oven has an air recirculating unit that I regularly use.  Not sure if this was responsible for the difference in bake times.


Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #397 on: September 01, 2019, 06:28:57 PM »
Steak subs are a glorious thing of beauty! :P

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #398 on: September 01, 2019, 08:52:43 PM »
Steak subs are a glorious thing of beauty! :P

My attention was recently directed to something called a Baltimore Pit Beef Sandwich by a resident of that fair city.  Said resident displayed symptoms reminiscent of Penis Envy while lamenting that the Philly Cheesesteak Sandwich was getting all the glory while the Baltimore Pit Beef Sandwich -- in his view, a vastly superior entity -- was marginalized.  During his rant, he blamed the media, though whether conservative or liberal I have forgotten.

I still have a sizeable portion of beef round purchased for the Mississippi Roast, and plan to use that for investigating his claims.

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« Reply #399 on: September 02, 2019, 11:28:18 PM »
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Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #400 on: September 08, 2019, 05:57:19 PM »
I hope you get great results, starr. If you like cranberries I have an old bread recipe that I used for Thanksgiving and Christmas baking.

Ooff- I have got to rewrite this one- the original is so worn and tattered.

Cranberry Bread

Sift together:
2 cups sifted flour
1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
1 cup sugar

Cream together:
2 TBS. Shortening (I like to use high ratio but your favorite will do quite well)
3/4 cup orange juice (room temperature or it will affect the egg and shortening)
1 egg beaten

Mix dry and wet together thoroughly.

Fold in:

1 Cup cranberries, cut in halves.

Pour into a greased 9x5x3" loaf pan. Bake until toothpick stuck into center comes out clean.

Temperature: 350 degrees

Time: Approx. 1 hour

Enjoy  :-*

This was one I wanted to try, and as luck would have it, I was able to secure a can of Crisco.  However, I had problems "creaming" those ingredients in any meaningful way, and the batter was very thick, not something that seemed hospitable to the notion of folding in another ingredient.  I decided to use a can of whole berry cranberry sauce instead.

The results were nothing short of superb.  Great taste, look, and consistency.  Really easy to make, too (except for that "creamed" part).



By the way, the old bird that I bake for had a birthday last Friday.  As promised, I delivered two loaves of orange bread to her.  She wouldn't let anyone touch the bag, much less look at them.  Later, she opened a cloth pouch which contained a tidy sum of money pooled by her family.  She was crying, and others too.  Someone noticed that the husband, who had been largely silent during the dinner, had a tear running down his cheek.  Someone asked, "Why are YOU crying, Pa?"  He smiled and replied, "Because I'm not getting any money."  Then the wife wiped his tear with one of her thousand peso notes.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #401 on: September 09, 2019, 07:05:05 PM »
"Bill From Madison" should comment:  Finns in Minnesota trying to keep the cooking/baking traditions. 

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-midwest-s-finnish-triangle-is-a-land-of-saunas-and-squeaky-cheeses?utm_source=pocket-newtab



Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #402 on: September 13, 2019, 08:21:37 PM »
Request: I need a hamburger bun recipe and tips to make it work right. 

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #403 on: September 13, 2019, 08:36:16 PM »
I am sure you could goggle search a hamburger bun recipe.

Personally, I would attempt making a classic brioche dough and attempt to let the dough "balls" rise on a sheet pan, might need to put a baking ring around them, brioche dough is very wet and loose.

Anyhow, if it could be managed you'd end up with something like a "King's Hawaiian" hamburger bun.

How 'bout them apples, DPS?

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #404 on: September 13, 2019, 08:40:47 PM »
I am sure you could goggle search a hamburger bun recipe.

Personally, I would attempt making a classic brioche dough and attempt to let the dough "balls" rise on a sheet pan, might need to put a baking ring around them, brioche dough is very wet and loose.

Anyhow, if it could be managed you'd end up with something like a "King's Hawaiian" hamburger bun.

How 'bout them apples, DPS?

That's why I asked here rather than googling, turnip fucker.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #405 on: September 13, 2019, 08:59:24 PM »
Wild Ass Guess, but I think a 4oz brioche-dough ball would probably rise to a hamburgerish sized "bun."

Just for fun, use turnip slices instead of tomatoes.  Maybe even play with stinky-cheese for the burgers.  Arugula instead of lettuce, go nutz!

-pate

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #406 on: September 13, 2019, 09:01:23 PM »
Fags.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #407 on: September 13, 2019, 09:03:13 PM »
Wild Ass Guess, but I think a 4oz brioche-dough ball would probably rise to a hamburgerish sized "bun."

Just for fun, use turnip slices instead of tomatoes.  Maybe even play with stinky-cheese for the burgers.  Arugula instead of lettuce, go nutz!

-pate

I think it would be a little too cute for a hamburger bun.  But I appreciate the idea.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #408 on: September 13, 2019, 09:08:05 PM »
FagsFake and gay, like my voice & "shoes".

FIFY

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #409 on: September 13, 2019, 09:10:45 PM »

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #410 on: September 13, 2019, 09:42:16 PM »
Pizza on the grill.  Baked at 750 degrees.
So cooked by conduction from below?

I've been doing pizza in a pan in the electric oven.  I have a gas barbecue.  If I tried your method, I'd probably have to pre-cook the vegetables, which I haven't been doing.  I could use the barbecue as an oven instead.  How'd you come to be doing it as shown?

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #411 on: September 14, 2019, 02:34:48 AM »

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #412 on: September 14, 2019, 02:48:31 AM »
For your amusement, here is my practice cross braid made a few days before (hence the uncolored eggs).  It turned into a monster and the far egg rolled off the end of the sheet.  Didn't expect so much rise; it's an uncommonly rich and sugary dough.  I ended up making two instead for Easter that were more presentable, but the eggs went all cattywompus in the expanding dough and looked vaguely obscene, like they were trying to get away from each other.  I think next year I will lay them on their sides.



It tasted good, though:  cardamom, mahlepi, mastic, and a little cinnamon

Perhaps it is time to start another sour dough culture? I used to enjoy baking bread when I had time- and then life got too busy for sour dough.  :(

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #413 on: September 14, 2019, 06:32:38 AM »
So cooked by conduction from below?

I've been doing pizza in a pan in the electric oven.  I have a gas barbecue.  If I tried your method, I'd probably have to pre-cook the vegetables, which I haven't been doing.  I could use the barbecue as an oven instead.  How'd you come to be doing it as shown?
I have a Big Green Egg that has the deflector plate.  Fired by charcoal and gets real hot when the cover is down and the vents are wide open.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #414 on: September 14, 2019, 10:05:45 AM »
I know it took ages but ... Lardy Cake

 

 
 
 

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #415 on: September 14, 2019, 10:47:07 AM »
I know it took ages but ... Lardy Cake

Thank you so much!  It is not nearly as big as I thought.  I wonder what the custard powder is doing in there -- I suppose it is Bird's, which I have, and would give a discreet vanilla flavor in addition to whatever it is doing texture-wise.  No spices listed either -- do you taste anything except vanilla?

The pictures give an excellent view of the shaping, too!  It appears to be a flattened ball of dough liberally anointed with fat (presumably the margarine listed) with the edges folded back under the way you shape a bun (the added fat keeps them from rejoining the main mass, producing a layered effect), with the resulting pocket used to hold most of the fruit.

I have always read that the English refer to the golden raisins as sultanas but clearly that is not the case.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #416 on: September 14, 2019, 10:50:26 AM »
I do see a couple of what may be those red things we call "flame raisins" -- I wonder of I can find those on short notice.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #417 on: September 14, 2019, 10:56:03 AM »
Thank you so much!  It is not nearly as big as I thought.  I wonder what the custard powder is doing in there -- I suppose it is Bird's, which I have, and would give a discreet vanilla flavor in addition to whatever it is doing texture-wise.  No spices listed either -- do you taste anything except vanilla?

The pictures give an excellent view of the shaping, too!  It appears to be a flattened ball of dough liberally anointed with fat (presumably the margarine listed) with the edges folded back under the way you shape a bun (the added fat keeps them from rejoining the main mass, producing a layered effect), with the resulting pocket used to hold most of the fruit.

I have always read that the English refer to the golden raisins as sultanas but clearly that is not the case.

Size wise I would say small side plate size.

The glaze is a sweet glaze, akin to what you might find on baklava so sugary glaze, not fat based. No real spice ... the raisins do their job. Layered dough but springy and not unlike a cinnamon roll type consistency.


Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #418 on: September 14, 2019, 10:57:40 AM »
Perhaps it is time to start another sour dough culture? I used to enjoy baking bread when I had time- and then life got too busy for sour dough.  :(

I would love to learn how you do it since I have no experience with starters.  What sort of bread do you make with them?

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #419 on: September 14, 2019, 11:04:36 AM »
Size wise I would say small side plate size.

The glaze is a sweet glaze, akin to what you might find on baklava so sugary glaze, not fat based. No real spice ... the raisins do their job. Layered dough but springy and not unlike a cinnamon roll type consistency.

Thank you, I think that is within reach!  It does not seem to have any pan marks so I am guessing it is baked on a sheet or even directly on a baking stone (or the bottom of the oven, if they are using some big ancient thing).  I think I have some sacrificial bakeware in case the glaze adheres.

I will post pictures of my efforts so you can all hoot and jeer.