Author Topic: Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop  (Read 10911 times)

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Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #270 on: May 31, 2019, 02:27:12 AM »
The topping sounds just like a creme fresh with some sort of stabilizer. I don't know what it would be though.
.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #271 on: May 31, 2019, 02:28:27 AM »
I have an old 1937 (I think) radio in the basement. Great big floor model that I had rebuilt a few years back and no longer works right (pretty certain it's a capacitor issue.) That said, I considered a nice bakelite table model, but never did buy one. I'm assuming AM (and shortwave) only? How do you find the reception?

It is ok, sounds very tinny with a lot of old-timey pops which I like.  I don't dare change the station or I'll probably never find it again.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #272 on: May 31, 2019, 02:31:49 AM »
Also, we used just regular fresh squeezed lime juice, not key lime.

Haha oh that is a riot.  I use Nellie and Joe's juice which is all we usually get here, though once in a while I see the little limes and am tempted.

You mean like the crème fraîche you buy in a little tub, sweetened and with vanilla?  That very well could be; I would never have thought of it.


Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #273 on: May 31, 2019, 03:05:12 AM »
Haha oh that is a riot.  I use Nellie and Joe's juice which is all we usually get here, though once in a while I see the little limes and am tempted.

You mean like the crème fraîche you buy in a little tub, sweetened and with vanilla?  That very well could be; I would never have thought of it.

Yes, that would be it before I realized I could just make it. Just take 'heavy whipping cream' it's in the milk section. Whip it, throw some vanilla and sugar in and continue whipping. You can do it by hand, just make sure everything is cold and stays cold. Throw everything in the freezer before you whip it.

I was a little surprised that they didn't actually use key lime too.


Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #274 on: May 31, 2019, 03:20:20 AM »
Yes, that would be it before I realized I could just make it. Just take 'heavy whipping cream' it's in the milk section. Whip it, throw some vanilla and sugar in and continue whipping. You can do it by hand, just make sure everything is cold and stays cold. Throw everything in the freezer before you whip it.

I was a little surprised that they didn't actually use key lime too.

Ok so somewhere between stiff peaks and butter there is a thing like firm whipped cream?  I can't believe I've never tried that.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #275 on: May 31, 2019, 03:25:37 AM »
The Key Lime Pie I have had here had a filling that was like a mousse topped with a layer of green goo, no doubt full of health-giving additives, and a gingery biscuit base. So I had a go myself, using digestive biscuits for the base (is that like Graham crackers?) and the filling was a combo of condensed milk, egg yolks and lime juice. Pretty good as i recall, although I was sneered at by a lousy American for using all the wrong ingredients.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #276 on: May 31, 2019, 03:27:19 AM »
Ok so somewhere between stiff peaks and butter there is a thing like firm whipped cream?  I can't believe I've never tried that.

Wasn't Stiff Peaks the name of that David Lynch-themed porn film that you mercifully never managed to get made?

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #277 on: May 31, 2019, 03:31:31 AM »
The Key Lime Pie I have had here had a filling that was like a mousse topped with a layer of green goo, no doubt full of health-giving additives, and a gingery biscuit base. So I had a go myself, using digestive biscuits for the base (is that like Graham crackers?) and the filling was a combo of condensed milk, egg yolks and lime juice. Pretty good as i recall, although I was sneered at by a lousy American for using all the wrong ingredients.

That's the filling but make sure it's what we call sweetened condensed milk, not just evaporated.  God knows what you people call that stuff.

Digestives would be an improvement IMO, but ginger nuts would be even better.  I put ginger in mine.  The one my mom got had coconut in the crust, too, which was kind of nice.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #278 on: May 31, 2019, 03:33:45 AM »
Wasn't Stiff Peaks the name of that David Lynch-themed porn film that you mercifully never managed to get made?

You will never look at a spatula the same way again.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #279 on: May 31, 2019, 03:39:39 AM »
Wasn't Stiff Peaks the name of that David Lynch-themed porn film that you mercifully never managed to get made?

lol

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #280 on: May 31, 2019, 03:48:32 AM »
That's the filling but make sure it's what we call sweetened condensed milk, not just evaporated.  God knows what you people call that stuff.

Digestives would be an improvement IMO, but ginger nuts would be even better.  I put ginger in mine.  The one my mom got had coconut in the crust, too, which was kind of nice.

One is thick, the other is thin. I used to loathe evaporated milk but it's grown on me over the years. I keep meaning to use condensed milk to make mill!ionaire shortbread, but I'd like to hang on to my teeth and waistline a bit longer. Brits used to use condensed milk in tea when they were out in India, presumably because it kept better. I don't usually drink sweetened tea but it was rather good and gave it a sort of caramel flavour.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #281 on: May 31, 2019, 04:14:34 AM »
I love that radio. I do the ice cube trick too but I think it's to make a harder crust. Pro bakeries oven's steam automatically for the first few seconds of the bake.
The steam also helps them rise a bit more in the oven too. Since K_Dubb puts the rolls in plastic while still warm I figured that would soften them back up.  I would cry if that was done with crusty bread.  I am against bread bondage.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #282 on: May 31, 2019, 06:43:56 AM »
One is thick, the other is thin. I used to loathe evaporated milk but it's grown on me over the years. I keep meaning to use condensed milk to make mill!ionaire shortbread, but I'd like to hang on to my teeth and waistline a bit longer. Brits used to use condensed milk in tea when they were out in India, presumably because it kept better. I don't usually drink sweetened tea but it was rather good and gave it a sort of caramel flavour.


Well if you are ever in Dixie on a hot summer day, swing by Bojangle's and get a sweet tea.  Brace yourself
because it seems to be 2 parts tea to 1 part super saturated sugar but very refreshing when it's hot out.


Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #283 on: May 31, 2019, 07:57:33 AM »

Well if you are ever in Dixie on a hot summer day, swing by Bojangle's and get a sweet tea.  Brace yourself
because it seems to be 2 parts tea to 1 part super saturated sugar but very refreshing when it's hot out.



That's all well and good but do they have boiled sheep on the menu?

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #284 on: May 31, 2019, 08:34:26 AM »
The steam also helps them rise a bit more in the oven too. Since K_Dubb puts the rolls in plastic while still warm I figured that would soften them back up.  I would cry if that was done with crusty bread.  I am against bread bondage.

Oh yeah I know it is horrible by artisan standards.  But I tried everything to get that slightly tacky, gummy crust I remember from our favorite bakery where the whole thing was like eating a soft doughball.  When I figured it wasn't kitchen wizardry but the old couple that ran it just bagged them up warm I felt like an idiot.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #285 on: May 31, 2019, 05:26:23 PM »
That's all well and good but do they have boiled sheep on the menu?

Sadly for you they do not.  I guess Dirty Rice is not much of a substitute, is it?


Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #286 on: May 31, 2019, 06:04:22 PM »
Sadly for you they do not.  I guess Dirty Rice is not much of a substitute, is it?



When Shreddie, against all advice,
Saw Dixie, he tried dirty rice,
Which he promptly eschewed,
Glaring' round:  "It's not lewd!",
Like a petulant bald cockatrice.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #287 on: May 31, 2019, 06:19:35 PM »
Sadly for you they do not.  I guess Dirty Rice is not much of a substitute, is it?



No, I prefer something a bit more manly. Dirty rice sounds like the kind of stuff you'd order with K_Dubb, before heading to the docks to find some sailors. #AsslessChaps.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #288 on: May 31, 2019, 06:28:54 PM »
No, I prefer something a bit more manly. Dirty rice sounds like the kind of stuff you'd order with K_Dubb, before heading to the docks to find some sailors. #AsslessChaps.

Can I interest you in some very manly sweet buns?

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #289 on: May 31, 2019, 07:08:26 PM »
No, I prefer something a bit more manly. Dirty rice sounds like the kind of stuff you'd order with K_Dubb, before heading to the docks to find some sailors. #AsslessChaps.

Fair enough.  Be like that.  The fleets in and we found some sailors.   We would have saved you one but since you are being a snark bucket we thought better of it.




Oh.  All right.  K_Dubb was feeling *some* remorse so we'll shoot you a Sweet Tater Pie.   Enjoy,


Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #290 on: May 31, 2019, 08:07:44 PM »
anyone want a muffin?


Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #291 on: May 31, 2019, 10:43:11 PM »
anyone want a muffin?



Timeo Gothos et dona ferentis

Actually I'm equally afraid of Walks's pie  :o

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #292 on: May 31, 2019, 11:12:29 PM »
One is thick, the other is thin. I used to loathe evaporated milk but it's grown on me over the years. I keep meaning to use condensed milk to make mill!ionaire shortbread, but I'd like to hang on to my teeth and waistline a bit longer. Brits used to use condensed milk in tea when they were out in India, presumably because it kept better. I don't usually drink sweetened tea but it was rather good and gave it a sort of caramel flavour.
The best use for sweetened condensed milk: Vietnamese iced coffee.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #293 on: May 31, 2019, 11:31:20 PM »
My mom got a key lime pie from a local bakery and, after I pointed out that the filling has but three ingredients and that I could make a better crust and do it for a lot less than the $35 she forked over for the damn thing, I noticed that it had whipped cream piped on top that was very sharp and firm but still tasted good and rich, like you didn't even notice the stabilizer.  Does anyone know how to make that?  I think Safeway uses the same stuff on their pumpkin pie in the fall.

Unflavored gelatin can be used as a stabilizer for whipped cream icings.

1 Tsp unflavored gelatin
1 1/2 TBS cold water
1 1/2 TBS boiling water

'Bloom' the gelatin in cold water and let it set for 5 mins. Add boiled water to the gelatin mixture and stir to dissolve. Use immediately in your recipe. Use a stand or hand mixer and whip the cream into soft- medium peaks- then add melted stabilizer all at once. Continue mixing until desired consistency. Use immediately. Any desserts with this topping need to be refrigerated.

I am not sure if this always works out. It is tricky to mix hot/warm with very cold ingredients. It could set up before you get the texture you want.

You can also use 1/4 tsp cream of tartar and 1 TBS powdered sugar.

or- 2 tsps powdered milk and 1 TBS powdered sugar.

I have also heard that you can use 2 tsps cream cheese and 1 TBS powdered sugar per cup of whipped cream mixture to make a good piping cream.

I hope that helps. 

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #294 on: May 31, 2019, 11:54:09 PM »
Unflavored gelatin can be used as a stabilizer for whipped cream icings.

1 Tsp unflavored gelatin
1 1/2 TBS cold water
1 1/2 TBS boiling water

'Bloom' the gelatin in cold water and let it set for 5 mins. Add boiled water to the gelatin mixture and stir to dissolve. Use immediately in your recipe. Use a stand or hand mixer and whip the cream into soft- medium peaks- then add melted stabilizer all at once. Continue mixing until desired consistency. Use immediately. Any desserts with this topping need to be refrigerated.

I am not sure if this always works out. It is tricky to mix hot/warm with very cold ingredients. It could set up before you get the texture you want.

You can also use 1/4 tsp cream of tartar and 1 TBS powdered sugar.

or- 2 tsps powdered milk and 1 TBS powdered sugar.

I have also heard that you can use 2 tsps cream cheese and 1 TBS powdered sugar per cup of whipped cream mixture to make a good piping cream.

I hope that helps.

Thank you so much, pye; I have some experimenting to do.  I will try them all.  That part will be fun, but piping all those perfectly even dots all over the top of a pie gives me the willies hahaha

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #295 on: June 01, 2019, 12:08:13 AM »
Thank you so much, pye; I have some experimenting to do.  I will try them all.  That part will be fun, but piping all those perfectly even dots all over the top of a pie gives me the willies hahaha

I hope they work for you. Piping can be tricky; I cannot do the fine, intricate style. You can get great results using the larger size tips- try your best at keeping your pressure even for uniform size and spacing. Most people do not notice mistakes and the 'evidence' is usually gone before anyone is the wiser.

I made a last minute birthday cake for a friend's child. I stayed up very late decorating and did not notice that I had made an embarrassing mistake - I made a little plaque for the cake top that should have said: 'Happy Birthday ______' with flowers decorations around it. When they showed me the photos- I then noticed that I had written 'Birtday' - no one noticed or cared, I guess. They loved the cake- misspelling and all.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #296 on: June 01, 2019, 12:22:33 AM »
I hope they work for you. Piping can be tricky; I cannot do the fine, intricate style. You can get great results using the larger size tips- try your best at keeping your pressure even for uniform size and spacing. Most people do not notice mistakes and the 'evidence' is usually gone before anyone is the wiser.

I made a last minute birthday cake for a friend's child. I stayed up very late decorating and did not notice that I had made an embarrassing mistake - I made a little plaque for the cake top that should have said: 'Happy Birthday ______' with flowers decorations around it. When they showed me the photos- I then noticed that I had written 'Birtday' - no one noticed or cared, I guess. They loved the cake- misspelling and all.

Haha oh that is good to know.  Mom was quite taken with it -- she's always loved whipped cream where I go for custards and Dad is off after chocolate -- so I need to get this right.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #297 on: June 01, 2019, 01:27:57 AM »
Can I use polenta to make cornbread? I keep meaning to make it, and it doesn't look very hard, but I'm not sure if I can find the right ingredients here. I know you can't buy a mix like you're used to over there.

Not sure if this is authoritative, but what I have observed is three categories of corn meal: fine ground, medium ground, and polenta (coarse).  So to answer your question, you probably could, but with coarse ground corn it might be a little grainy in texture.  Adding a can of corn (drained and fried with a bit of butter) to the mixture might offset this a bit.  If you can find it, the fine ground corn meal should give you the best results.

In the end, it depends upon your audience.  The "purists" who grew up with the Southern style might be quite happy with polenta, so long as you baked it by frying it in bacon grease in a skillet.  Where I live, they dislike the crumbly texture and lack of sweetness in the typical American style version of cornbread (they put sugar in EVERYTHING here, even spaghetti sauce).  So let me give you the recipe of how I make it here, and at the end I will explain how to back out of it to something more in the American style.  I'll also give you my method of making buttermilk from buttermilk powder, in case you can't get it "live."  Makes 12+ muffins or one 9x9 pan.

Dry Ingredients
----------------------------
175g all purpose flour (about one cup)
150g yellow cornmeal (about one cup)
50g white sugar (~1/4 cup)
4g baking soda (~1 tsp)
1/2 tsp salt

Wet Ingredients
----------------------------
1 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup melted butter
1/4 cup honey
3 eggs, beaten

To make buttermilk from powdered buttermilk mix
------------------------------------------------------------
1 cup hot water
50g dry buttermilk powder

Mix together and let stand for five minutes

Directions

1.  In a large bowl, stir together the dry ingredients.  Make a well in the center, and then add the wet ingredients.  Stir to combine.  Pour batter into a baking pan, or ~2 TB of batter per well if making muffins.

2.  Bake for 20-25 minutes at 190C/375F for a bread loaf, or 10-12 minutes for muffins.

Variations:

*  Cut some beef hot dogs into 2cm long pieces.  Place 1 TB of batter into each muffin well, then stand up a hot dog piece into the middle of the mixture.  You make little corn dogs this way.  Here's some that I made recently:



(four of them didn't even last long enough to be photographed)

* To make it "unsweetened" omit the honey.

* To make it crumbly texture in the American style, use 2 eggs only.

* Reduce temperature to 175C/350F and bake for five minutes more (more uniform baking)

* Cook in skillet with generous amounts of bacon grease.  Makes a crusty bottom and sides.  Looks like this:


Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #298 on: June 01, 2019, 04:13:45 PM »
Cherry pie for dessert.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #299 on: June 02, 2019, 04:16:26 AM »
I prefer something a bit more manly.

Of course you do.