Author Topic: Military History  (Read 1306 times)

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Re: Military History
« Reply #60 on: December 17, 2018, 09:57:02 PM »
From WWII Colourised Photos:

American troops from the HQ Company of the 526th Armored Infantry Battalion (12 Army Group) with M-3 Half Tracks and a Dodge WC-63 parked up in Rue de la Gare in Malmedy, Belgium, Mid December 1944.

526th Armored Infantry Battalion
Headquarters Company

At 1600 hours, Sunday December 17, the battalion was ordered by First U.S. Army to move to Malmedy, Belgium, with Company “A” 825th Tank Destroyer Battalion attached, and to join the 99th Infantry Battalion (Norwegian) at Remouchamps en route. At 1900 hours the battalion was formed on the Aywaille-Remouchamps road and waiting to fall in with the 99th Infantry Battalion at Remouchamps. The 99th Infantry Battalion failed to show up by 2100 so this battalion was ordered to move alone at once, picking up Company “A” 825th en route at La Reid, Belgium. It was during this period that the Luftwaffe suddenly came to life, strafed and bombed roads between Spa and Malmedy.

The battalion plus Company “A”, 825th Tank Destroyer Battalion, then proceeded on to Malmedy. Road conditions were bad and it was exceedingly difficult to maintain control in the blackout. En route one rifle squad half-track and one half-track with a towed 57mm AT gun dropped out of the column as a result of accidents. The 57mm AT gun and half-track, in following, took position at Trois-Ponts and engaged an enemy column of 18 tanks (Kampfgruppe Peiper), knocking out the lead tank which blocked the advance. However, the 57mm was, in turn, knocked out and four men killed and one wounded.
Shortly after midnight December 17-18, a message was received from First U.S. Army that enemy tanks were approaching Stavelot and ordered one rifle company and one platoon of tank destroyers dispatched there to form road blocks and hold the enemy. Company “A” with 1st Platoon, Company “A”, 825th Tank Destroyer Battalion attached was selected for this assignment, and the executive officer was placed in command of the task force.

The balance of the force continued on to Malmedy. On arrival, it immediately began to set up road blocks and defensive positions. This battalion, plus the tank destroyers, were the first combat unit to take up positions for the defense of Malmedy. The 99th Infantry Battalion arrived immediately following the arrival of the 526th and took positions in and around the town. The 117th Infantry began to arrive about daylight on the morning of December 18.

During the period of combat at Malmedy and Stavelot, casualties were: 33 killed, 58 wounded, and 24 missing. The orders were to hold Malmedy and Stavelot at all costs. The two towns were held and the enemy did not gain use of the road nets offered by them. Losses in vehicles were as follows: for the 526th, 2 half-tracks, one ¼ ton truck and three 3-inch towed tank destroyer guns. (battleofthebulgememories.be)

(Photo source - US Army Signal Corps)

(Colour by RJM)


Re: Military History
« Reply #61 on: December 21, 2018, 11:40:59 AM »
The Battle of the Bulge (16 December 1944 – 25 January 1945) was the last major German offensive campaign on the Western Front during World War II. It was launched through the densely forested Ardennes region of Wallonia in eastern Belgium, northeast France, and Luxembourg, towards the end of World War II. The furthest west the offensive reached was the village of Foy-Nôtre-Dame, south east of Dinant, being stopped by the British 21st Army Group on 24 December 1944. The German offensive was intended to stop Allied use of the Belgian port of Antwerp and to split the Allied lines, allowing the Germans to encircle and destroy four Allied armies and force the Western Allies to negotiate a peace treaty in the Axis powers' favor. Once that was accomplished, the German dictator Adolf Hitler believed he could fully concentrate on the Soviets on the Eastern Front.



NUTS!!!

General Anthony Clement "Nuts" McAuliffe (July 2, 1898 – August 11, 1975) was a senior United States Army officer who earned fame as the acting commander of the U.S. 101st Airborne Division troops defending Bastogne, Belgium, during the Battle of the Bulge in World War II.
On the German demand of surrender:
The Division Operations Officer, Lt. Col. Harry Kinnard recalled that McAulliffe initially asked, "They want to surrender?" Moore told him, "No sir, they want us to surrender." McAulliffe arose and erupted in anger, which shocked those looking on. He took the paper, looked at it, said "Us surrender, aw nuts!" and dropped it on the floor. Maj. Jones was dismissed. McAulliffe then left the Headquarters to go congratulate a unit on the Western perimeter that had successfully taken out a German road block earlier that morning.






Re: Military History
« Reply #62 on: December 21, 2018, 11:45:18 AM »
Fourteen minutes.



Re: Military History
« Reply #63 on: December 21, 2018, 11:51:21 AM »
From Hallowed Grounds:

TO FAIRFAX FOR CHRISTMAS

Fairfax County, Virginia
December, 1861
Artwork by John Paul Strain

By the winter of 1861, Brigadier General James Ewell Brown Stuart was well on his way to building a reputation as a fine leader of light cavalry. Before the close of the war Stuart, known to his troops as JEB, had cemented his place in American History as our most famous cavalryman. His career in the Confederate Army seemed to resemble the lavish writings of a romance novel rather than the story of an actual soldier. There was a sense of chivalry and adventure that JEB Stuart personified. A single glance as he rode by with his gold braided uniform, plumed hat and red-lined cape, convinced everyone that here was a man with confidence unbounded, daring and bold. He had a magnetic quality of leadership that earned him loyalty and devotion by those who followed him, and the respect and admiration of the Confederate High Command.

During the winter of 1861, Stuart's responsibility was that of advanced guard, patrolling the Confederate border outside Washington. He had set up his headquarters near Fairfax Courthouse, in a camp he named, "Qui Vive", which is the French phrase for the military challenge of "Who goes there?"

JEB always seemed to be of good cheer whatever the task. Even as the air was full of hissing minie balls and exploding shells, his men would hear him humming a happy tune. Having recently been engaged in the battle of Dranesville, on December 20th, JEB was ready to see his wife again and take part in the season's festivities. When the duties of war subsided, JEB always enjoyed good music and the chance to gather with friends and family. Such was the case during the Christmas week of 1861. At a time of exciting new challenges, coupled with the uncertainties of a nation at war, this would be a special Christmas for JEB Stuart, one he would be spending with his loving wife Flora and their two children.



Re: Military History
« Reply #64 on: December 21, 2018, 12:00:10 PM »


J.E.B. Stuart’s Death at Yellow Tavern
During Ulysses S. Grant’s Overland Campaign in 1864, Union Major General Philip Sheridan proposed an overwhelming offensive against J.E.B. Stuart’s forces. On May 11, 1864, Sheridan’s superior numbers engaged Stuart’s cavalry outside of Richmond near an inn called Yellow Tavern. While firing his revolver at Union troops and shouting orders to his men Stuart was shot through his left side by a Union cavalryman. He was taken to Richmond, where he died on May 12, 1864, at the age of 31.


This is just a segment of an article that is best read, in full:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.history.com/.amp/topics/american-civil-war/j-e-b-stuart

Re: Military History
« Reply #65 on: December 21, 2018, 12:05:48 PM »
Forty Five minutes.



I've yet to watch this one but the History Channel usually does a good job with these.
Yes, I plan to watch it! 😁

Re: Military History
« Reply #66 on: December 21, 2018, 01:03:07 PM »
From WWII Colourised Photos:

American troops from the HQ Company of the 526th Armored Infantry Battalion (12 Army Group) with M-3 Half Tracks and a Dodge WC-63 parked up in Rue de la Gare in Malmedy, Belgium, Mid December 1944.

526th Armored Infantry Battalion
Headquarters Company

At 1600 hours, Sunday December 17, the battalion was ordered by First U.S. Army to move to Malmedy, Belgium, with Company “A” 825th Tank Destroyer Battalion attached, and to join the 99th Infantry Battalion (Norwegian) at Remouchamps en route. At 1900 hours the battalion was formed on the Aywaille-Remouchamps road and waiting to fall in with the 99th Infantry Battalion at Remouchamps. The 99th Infantry Battalion failed to show up by 2100 so this battalion was ordered to move alone at once, picking up Company “A” 825th en route at La Reid, Belgium. It was during this period that the Luftwaffe suddenly came to life, strafed and bombed roads between Spa and Malmedy.

The battalion plus Company “A”, 825th Tank Destroyer Battalion, then proceeded on to Malmedy. Road conditions were bad and it was exceedingly difficult to maintain control in the blackout. En route one rifle squad half-track and one half-track with a towed 57mm AT gun dropped out of the column as a result of accidents. The 57mm AT gun and half-track, in following, took position at Trois-Ponts and engaged an enemy column of 18 tanks (Kampfgruppe Peiper), knocking out the lead tank which blocked the advance. However, the 57mm was, in turn, knocked out and four men killed and one wounded.
Shortly after midnight December 17-18, a message was received from First U.S. Army that enemy tanks were approaching Stavelot and ordered one rifle company and one platoon of tank destroyers dispatched there to form road blocks and hold the enemy. Company “A” with 1st Platoon, Company “A”, 825th Tank Destroyer Battalion attached was selected for this assignment, and the executive officer was placed in command of the task force.

The balance of the force continued on to Malmedy. On arrival, it immediately began to set up road blocks and defensive positions. This battalion, plus the tank destroyers, were the first combat unit to take up positions for the defense of Malmedy. The 99th Infantry Battalion arrived immediately following the arrival of the 526th and took positions in and around the town. The 117th Infantry began to arrive about daylight on the morning of December 18.

During the period of combat at Malmedy and Stavelot, casualties were: 33 killed, 58 wounded, and 24 missing. The orders were to hold Malmedy and Stavelot at all costs. The two towns were held and the enemy did not gain use of the road nets offered by them. Losses in vehicles were as follows: for the 526th, 2 half-tracks, one ¼ ton truck and three 3-inch towed tank destroyer guns. (battleofthebulgememories.be)

(Photo source - US Army Signal Corps)

(Colour by RJM)



I've always wondered how popular tank destroyers were with their crews?  Sitting in an open cupola, as opposed to an enclosed armored turret, didn't offer much protection expect for straight ahead.  No question they were cheaper and easier to produce than full up tanks, I would have not wanted to go crew one of them.

Re: Military History
« Reply #67 on: December 24, 2018, 05:03:01 PM »
I've always wondered how popular tank destroyers were with their crews?  Sitting in an open cupola, as opposed to an enclosed armored turret, didn't offer much protection expect for straight ahead.  No question they were cheaper and easier to produce than full up tanks, I would have not wanted to go crew one of them.

I've read both good and bad about them. Lighter armor but they were never meant to get close enough that it would matter. I think the open turret would offer a quick escape if one did get caught by enemy armor.

Here's a sixteen minute video of my favorite:


Re: Military History
« Reply #68 on: December 24, 2018, 05:18:17 PM »
December 25, 1776. The Crossing.



During the American Revolution, Patriot General George Washington crosses the Delaware River with 5,400 troops, hoping to surprise a Hessian force celebrating Christmas at their winter quarters in Trenton, New Jersey. The unconventional attack came after several months of substantial defeats for Washington’s army that had resulted in the loss of New York City and other strategic points in the region.

At about 11 p.m. on Christmas, Washington’s army commenced its crossing of the half-frozen river at three locations. The 2,400 soldiers led by Washington successfully braved the icy and freezing river and reached the New Jersey side of the Delaware just before dawn. The other two divisions, made up of some 3,000 men and crucial artillery, failed to reach the meeting point at the appointed time.

At approximately 8 a.m. on the morning of December 26, Washington’s remaining force, separated into two columns, reached the outskirts of Trenton and descended on the unsuspecting Hessians. Trenton’s 1,400 Hessian defenders were groggy from the previous evening’s festivities and underestimated the Patriot threat after months of decisive British victories throughout New York. Washington’s men quickly overwhelmed the Germans’ defenses, and by 9:30 a.m. the town was surrounded. Although several hundred Hessians escaped, nearly 1,000 were captured at the cost of only four American lives. However, because most of Washington’s army had failed to cross the Delaware, he was without adequate artillery or men and was forced to withdraw from the town.

The victory was not particularly significant from a strategic point of view, but news of Washington’s initiative raised the spirits of the American colonists, who previously feared that the Continental Army was incapable of victory.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.history.com/.amp/this-day-in-history/washington-crosses-the-delaware

Four minutes.


Re: Military History
« Reply #69 on: December 24, 2018, 05:22:18 PM »
The Battle of Trenton. December 25-26, 1776.
(The Crossing, extended.)

Twenty eight minutes. Excellent video!




by Thomas Paine
December 23, 1776
THESE are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.

Re: Military History
« Reply #70 on: December 24, 2018, 09:09:01 PM »
I've read both good and bad about them. Lighter armor but they were never meant to get close enough that it would matter. I think the open turret would offer a quick escape if one did get caught by enemy armor.

Here's a sixteen minute video of my favorite:



Great video, thanks for the link

I wonder if there is an analogy between tank destroyers and  battlecruisers? Were tank destroyers used as if they were tanks by those not knowing any better like battlecruisers were used as if they were battleships, both suffering due to their lack of armor?

Re: Military History
« Reply #71 on: December 26, 2018, 04:09:31 AM »
From Hallowed Grounds

STUART'S CHRISTMAS RAID

Generals J.E.B. Stuart, Fitzhugh Lee, and Major John Pelham
Fairfax Courthouse, Virginia - December 1862
Artwork by John Paul Strain

Not wishing to rest on his laurels after the success of the battle of Fredericksburg, General J.E.B. Stuart planned a raid to disrupt Federal supply lines, cut telegraph communication, and force General Ambrose Burnside to weaken his position on the Rappahannock by sending countering forces. Other benefits of Stuart's raid would be to keep his men sharp and active and well supplied with captured stores.

The column headed out the day after Christmas with 1800 cavalrymen and four artillery pieces. As was usual with Stuart's raids, the cavalry covered many miles and had a number of small successful engagements where enemy soldiers, wagons, and equipment were captured. On the road to the town of Occoquan, Stuart's scouts detected two regiments of Federal cavalry setting up an ambush in the woods along the road. Stuart ordered General Fitzhugh Lee (Robert E. Lee's nephew), and the First Virginia cavalry to ride over the force and clear the woods. Without a moment's hesitation the 1st Virginia roared forward overcoming the surprised Federals and captured 100 of the fleeing Federal troops. Continuing the pursuit, Fitzhugh Lee and his men chased the Federals through the icy waters of Selectman's Ford. The ford was "narrow, rocky, and very difficult" to cross, and to everyone's amazement, Major John Pelham was able to drive his guns through the ford which was said to have been impassable by wheel. Arriving at the deserted Federal camps, Stuart's men carried off anything of value and burned the rest.

After regrouping Stuart's cavalry arrived after dark at Burke's Station on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and took over the telegraph office. General Stuart listened to his own telegraph operator describe the buzzing hornet's nest of the Federals communicating with each other on how to catch "the rebel raiders." Typical of General Stuart's audacious personality, he then sent his own message to the Federal commanders, complaining that the poor quality of Union mules was such that they were incapable of pulling all the supplies that Stuart had captured. Stuart attached his signature to the message, and decided that since the enemy now knew his position it was time to move. Figuring the Federals would assume his force would head south, Stuart and his men headed north to Fairfax Courthouse to surprise his opponent once again.

At Fairfax Courthouse Stuart's luck changed as their column began to take fire from a large Federal force waiting in ambush. But Stuart's men did not return fire, puzzling the Federal troops. A Federal soldier under a white flag of truce was sent to ask if the unknown force was friend or foe. One of Stuart's men sent to meet the soldier advised that the following morning he would have an answer to his question. Stuart ordered enormous campfires to be lighted and used as a screen as he and his men slipped away and escaped during the wintry night.


Re: Military History
« Reply #72 on: December 26, 2018, 10:57:03 AM »
Food for thought.


Re: Military History
« Reply #73 on: December 26, 2018, 01:56:19 PM »
I lived in Aquia Harbor for 15 years which is a development that sits on Aquia Creek in Stafford County, Va.  My house was on a promonatory that overlooked the section of Aquia Creek where the little known Battle of Aquia Creek took place.  Later in the war Burnside landed Troops at Aquia Creek Landing in preparation for the assault on Fredericksburg which is about 11 miles south.  It was a great place to live for a civil war buff as it was not more than an hour's drive to battlefields like Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania Courthouse, the Wilderness, Manassis (Bull Run) etc and under two hours drive to battle sites on the Peninsula and around Richmond.

Couldn't find a video with a human narrator.  She mangles the pronunciation of Aquia which is more like Akwiya.



Re: Military History
« Reply #74 on: December 26, 2018, 09:40:34 PM »
Food for thought.



I firmly believe that if Lee had the resources and troops that the north had, the south would have won because most of the southern commanders were already battle tested by the Mexican Wars.
Furthermore, I do not think Lee would have engaged Union forces at Gettysburg. He would have flanked to the south and continued to Washington, thus placing the northern forces on the defensive and allowing Lee the option to determine when and where the battle would take place.

Re: Military History
« Reply #75 on: December 26, 2018, 11:22:33 PM »
I firmly believe that if Lee had the resources and troops that the north had, the south would have won because most of the southern commanders were already battle tested by the Mexican Wars.
Furthermore, I do not think Lee would have engaged Union forces at Gettysburg. He would have flanked to the south and continued to Washington, thus placing the northern forces on the defensive and allowing Lee the option to determine when and where the battle would take place.

No doubt the Union had much greater material resources.  In fact, the southern states had almost no industrial base at all.  However, at the beginning of the war virtually all army and corps commanders on both sides were veterans of the Mexican American War. 

At the beginning of the civil war roughly 1/4 of serving regular army officers went to the confederate side.  The rest remained in the Union Army.   Given this ratio, it is likely that the Union Army had 3 times the number of Mexican American war veterans in it than did the Confederate Army.  That number included General Winfield Scott who was the commanding general of the expedition into Mexico.  Note the following:

"With the outbreak of war in April 1861, both sides faced the monumental task of organizing and equipping armies that far exceeded the prewar structure in size and complexity. The Federals maintained control of the Regular Army, and the Confederates initially created a Regular force, though in reality it was mostly on paper. Almost immediately, the North lost many of its officers to the South, including some of exceptional quality. Of 1,108 Regular Army officers serving as of 1 January 1861, 270 ultimately resigned to join the South. Only a few hundred of 15,135 enlisted men, however, left the ranks."

"Much has been made of the West Point backgrounds of the men who ultimately dominated the senior leadership positions of both armies, but the graduates of military colleges were not prepared by such institutions to command divisions, corps, or armies. Moreover, though many leaders had some combat experience from the Mexican War era, very few had experience above the company or battery level in the peacetime years prior to 1861. As a result, the war was not initially conducted at any level by “professional officers” in today's terminology. Leaders became more professional through experience and at the cost of thousands of lives. General William T. Sherman would later note that the war did not enter its “professional stage” until 1863. By the time of the Overland Campaign, many officers, though varying in skill, were at least comfortable at commanding their formations."

https://www.thoughtco.com/generals-who-served-mexican-american-war-2136198

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armies_in_the_American_Civil_War



Re: Military History
« Reply #76 on: December 27, 2018, 01:21:25 AM »
No doubt the Union had much greater material resources.  In fact, the southern states had almost no industrial base at all.  However, at the beginning of the war virtually all army and corps commanders on both sides were veterans of the Mexican American War. 

At the beginning of the civil war roughly 1/4 of serving regular army officers went to the confederate side.  The rest remained in the Union Army.   Given this ratio, it is likely that the Union Army had 3 times the number of Mexican American war veterans in it than did the Confederate Army.  That number included General Winfield Scott who was the commanding general of the expedition into Mexico.  Note the following:

"With the outbreak of war in April 1861, both sides faced the monumental task of organizing and equipping armies that far exceeded the prewar structure in size and complexity. The Federals maintained control of the Regular Army, and the Confederates initially created a Regular force, though in reality it was mostly on paper. Almost immediately, the North lost many of its officers to the South, including some of exceptional quality. Of 1,108 Regular Army officers serving as of 1 January 1861, 270 ultimately resigned to join the South. Only a few hundred of 15,135 enlisted men, however, left the ranks."

"Much has been made of the West Point backgrounds of the men who ultimately dominated the senior leadership positions of both armies, but the graduates of military colleges were not prepared by such institutions to command divisions, corps, or armies. Moreover, though many leaders had some combat experience from the Mexican War era, very few had experience above the company or battery level in the peacetime years prior to 1861. As a result, the war was not initially conducted at any level by “professional officers” in today's terminology. Leaders became more professional through experience and at the cost of thousands of lives. General William T. Sherman would later note that the war did not enter its “professional stage” until 1863. By the time of the Overland Campaign, many officers, though varying in skill, were at least comfortable at commanding their formations."

https://www.thoughtco.com/generals-who-served-mexican-american-war-2136198

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armies_in_the_American_Civil_War

Another cut and paste snoozefest from kidnobrain. ;D

Re: Military History
« Reply #77 on: December 28, 2018, 09:36:05 AM »
At the beginning of the civil war roughly 1/4 of serving regular army officers went to the confederate side.  The rest remained in the Union Army.   Given this ratio, it is likely that the Union Army had 3 times the number of Mexican American war veterans in it than did the Confederate Army.  That number included General Winfield Scott who was the commanding general of the expedition into Mexico.

V.M.I. played a large role as well.



The Battle of New Market was fought on May 15, 1864, in Virginia during the Valley Campaigns of 1864 in the American Civil War. A makeshift Confederate army of 4,100 men, which included cadets from the Virginia Military Institute (VMI), defeated Union Major General Franz Sigel and his Army of the Shenandoah. The cadets were integral to the Confederate victory at New Market.




Re: Military History
« Reply #78 on: December 28, 2018, 09:37:49 AM »
Forty Five minutes.



I've yet to watch this one but the History Channel usually does a good job with these.
Yes, I plan to watch it! 😁

Watched and enjoyed! 😊

Re: Military History
« Reply #79 on: December 28, 2018, 09:54:48 AM »
I firmly believe that if Lee had the resources ...
If he'd only had AK-47's.  ;)



https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Guns_of_the_South

It's actually a pretty fun read.

Re: Military History
« Reply #80 on: December 28, 2018, 09:59:52 AM »
If he'd only had AK-47's.  ;)



https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Guns_of_the_South

It's actually a pretty fun read.

The best thing about wiki is the Plot Summary! 🙂

Re: Military History
« Reply #81 on: December 28, 2018, 10:04:52 AM »
The best thing about wiki is the Plot Summary! 🙂
Ha!  Yes, some pretty wild twists and turns in this Turtledove epic, with some wild premises.  Better than listening to Ed Dames wacko predictions, almost as good as Hoagland's version of science.  :D

Re: Military History
« Reply #82 on: December 28, 2018, 11:34:32 PM »
From Hallowed Grounds:

FIRE IN THE SKY

General N.B. Forrest’s Raid Into West Tennessee
Obion River – December 1862
Artwork by John Paul Strain

In the late winter of 1862 General Ulysses S. Grant's bold plans were in action. His goals were to send part of his force south to follow the railroad lines into central Mississippi to capture the state capital at Jackson and to send a column of troops under the command of General Sherman to take Vicksburg. Grant also deployed gun boats on the Tennessee River with plans to use their power at Vicksburg.

There was another power in Tennessee that Grant had not yet learned to respect, however, and that was General Nathan Bedford Forrest and his cavalry. Forrest’s assignment was to cause so much havoc and damage to Grant’s lines that the Federal Army’s offensive would be stopped, and Grant would not be able to re-enforce Murfreesboro or move on Vicksburg. For 15 days in the latter part of a sleeting and snowy December, Forrest and his cavalry raided west Tennessee. Forrest with his cavalry of about 2000 men, supported by 6 pieces of artillery, raised terror throughout the countryside. He spread rumors that his army was far greater that it actually was. Forrest fought a major battle at Parker’s Crossroads lasting 5 hours from which he escaped after being surrounded. He won two major engagements and skirmished several times a day with Federal troops. When his men were not fighting, they burned and destroyed every railroad trestle, culvert crossing, and wagon bridge across the countryside. Any supplies that were not hauled away were destroyed and depots were burned by Forrest’s men. All Grant’s supply routes and lines of communication were cut.

Just as the fires of the burning bridges destroyed General Grant’s communication and supply lines, so up in smoke went Grant’s hopes of capturing Vicksburg and Jackson, forcing his retreat to safer confines away from Forrest country. He now would have greater respect for the “Wizard of the Saddle”.


Re: Military History
« Reply #83 on: December 29, 2018, 11:18:39 AM »
From WWI Coulorised Photos

Italian soldier on lookout at Ombrettola Pass, snow landscape, south of Monte Marmolada, Dolomites.
 ca. 1915-1918

Italian and Austro-Hungarian troops clashed at altitudes up to 12,000 feet (3,600 metres) with temperatures as low as -22°F (-30°C) in the Guerra Bianca, or White War, named for its wintry theatre. Never before had battles been waged on such towering peaks or in such frigid conditions.

(Color by ROCOLOR)



Nine minutes.



Four minutes.


Re: Military History
« Reply #84 on: December 30, 2018, 01:27:01 PM »
From Hallowed Grounds

RAID ON THE L & N

Captain John Hunt Morgan
Winter of 1861-1862
Artwork by John Paul Strain

He was the model of a 19th century cavalry officer - tall, dashing, impeccably uniformed and always handsomely mounted. John Hunt Morgan was a Kentucky gentleman with a flair for the daring. He raised his own company of troops on the eve of war, and they followed him into Confederate service in 1861. An expert leader and a superb cavalry officer, he experienced a meteoric rise in rank from captain to brigadier general. His bold raids behind enemy lines in Tennessee and Kentucky - and into the Northern heartland of Ohio and Indiana - disrupted Federal operations, reinforced Confederate defenses and heartened the people of the embattled South.

Once, as Morgan brazenly led his horse soldiers on a raid through Federally-occupied Kentucky, President Lincoln was moved to declare in frustration: "They are having a stampede in Kentucky." Morgan launched his reputation as a dashing Confederate cavalier with a series of raids through Kentucky's Green River country in the winter of 1861-1862. Targeting the important Louisville & Nashville Railroad, Morgan - then a captain - led his hard-riding troopers on a romp behind enemy lines. Braving bitter winter weather, they burned bridges, captured at least one locomotive and destroyed countless Yankee railroad cars. When the raids ended, Northern forces in Kentucky were left distracted and unnerved - and the fame and fable of warfare had crowned the fearless John Hunt Morgan.


Re: Military History
« Reply #85 on: December 31, 2018, 07:05:28 AM »
From Hallowed Grounds

PARKER'S CROSSROADS

December 31, 1862
Artwork by John Paul Strain

On December 31, 1862, following a highly successful two week raid into the Federally controlled territory of Western Tennessee, Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest led 2,000 men in surrounding a Federal brigade of 3,000 men at Parker’s Crossroads. While awaiting their reply to his surrender terms, a member of his staff dashed up to General Forrest in great distress shouting, “We are between two lines of battle. What shall we do?”

Due to the failure of his scouts to inform him of the current location of a second Federal Brigade, with an additional 3,000 troops, he found himself encircled. With cool judgment and prompt action, General Forrest replied, “We’ll charge them both ways.” The Confederates did charge in both directions, which resulted in confusing the Federals and forcing both Federal Brigades to take up defensive positions, thereby allowing General Forrest and his troops time to depart the area and return safely to their territory.



From history.com

Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest narrowly escapes capture during a raid at Parker’s Crossroads in western Tennessee. Despite the close call, the raid was instrumental in forcing Union General Ulysses S. Grant to abandon his first attempt to capture Vicksburg, Mississippi.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.history.com/.amp/this-day-in-history/battle-of-parkers-crossroads

Re: Military History
« Reply #86 on: December 31, 2018, 01:52:28 PM »
V.M.I. played a large role as well.



The Battle of New Market was fought on May 15, 1864, in Virginia during the Valley Campaigns of 1864 in the American Civil War. A makeshift Confederate army of 4,100 men, which included cadets from the Virginia Military Institute (VMI), defeated Union Major General Franz Sigel and his Army of the Shenandoah. The cadets were integral to the Confederate victory at New Market.





New Market, Virginia 42F.




Re: Military History
« Reply #87 on: January 01, 2019, 07:34:03 PM »
From Hallowed Grounds

PARKER'S CROSSROADS

December 31, 1862
Artwork by John Paul Strain

On December 31, 1862, following a highly successful two week raid into the Federally controlled territory of Western Tennessee, Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest led 2,000 men in surrounding a Federal brigade of 3,000 men at Parker’s Crossroads. While awaiting their reply to his surrender terms, a member of his staff dashed up to General Forrest in great distress shouting, “We are between two lines of battle. What shall we do?”

Due to the failure of his scouts to inform him of the current location of a second Federal Brigade, with an additional 3,000 troops, he found himself encircled. With cool judgment and prompt action, General Forrest replied, “We’ll charge them both ways.” The Confederates did charge in both directions, which resulted in confusing the Federals and forcing both Federal Brigades to take up defensive positions, thereby allowing General Forrest and his troops time to depart the area and return safely to their territory.



From history.com

Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest narrowly escapes capture during a raid at Parker’s Crossroads in western Tennessee. Despite the close call, the raid was instrumental in forcing Union General Ulysses S. Grant to abandon his first attempt to capture Vicksburg, Mississippi.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.history.com/.amp/this-day-in-history/battle-of-parkers-crossroads

Nathan Bedford Forest was arguably the best combat leader and tactician on either side.  He was a "natural" with no formal military training and as best I can recall he never lost a battle.  Shelby Foote gave him a lot of ink in his Civil War Trilogy.

Re: Military History
« Reply #88 on: January 01, 2019, 07:38:03 PM »
New Market, Virginia 42F.




That place I think has more antique stores per capita than any other place and some neat old buildings.

Re: Military History
« Reply #89 on: January 01, 2019, 10:54:30 PM »
From Hallowed Grounds

BATTLE AT STONE'S RIVER

Murfreesboro, Tennessee
January 2, 1863
Artwork by John Paul Strain

After Confederate and Federal forces struggled to a draw at Perryville, Kentucky on October 8, 1862, General Braxton Bragg pulled his weary army back into East Tennessee to regroup. While at Murfreesboro in November, the army was renamed “The Army of Tennessee.” This southern army with its new designation would leave its proud mark on American military history.
A scant 30 miles north lay its opponent, the newly created Army of the Cumberland under its equally new commander Major General William S. Rosecrans. Urged on by President Lincoln and the administration in Washington to engage the Confederates, Rosecrans marched from Nashville on December the 26th toward what would become the “bloodiest single day of the war in Tennessee”.

Ferocious fighting on the 31st of December had ended in an apparent Southern victory. The Federal’s right and center lines lay crushed, and only the left had held on. Casualties had been unbelievable, with approximately 17,000 combined for this last day of 1862. But the battle wasn’t over yet.

On January 2nd at about 12:30 pm Breckinridge met with Bragg and received orders for an attack. Bragg wanted to occupy the hill opposite Breckinridge’s division and wanted to place artillery there.

Precisely at 4:00PM Breckinridge yelled “Up, my men and charge!” The line leaped forward, and the Kentuckians immediately came under fire. For nine hundred yards they maintained their “perfect line of battle”. Ordered to deliver just one volley then close with the bayonet, they kept coming. Under such determination the Federal front line collapsed, throwing the second line into confusion. The 1st Kentucky carried the hill Bragg had wanted, but the advance didn’t stop there. In the smoke and confusion, order and discipline were lost. Portions of the Second and Sixth Kentucky splashed across Stone’s River and began to scramble across the bank, when the Federals unleashed their massive artillery. None would advance further. The forty-five Union guns were more than enough to drive the Confederates back from the exposed hill above the ford. The destruction was terrible. “A more terrific fire of artillery I have never been under,” reflected one Rebel.

Of the 1,852 Kentuckians that moved out of the protection of the woods, 431 would not return including General Hanson. As General Breckinridge watched his beloved countrymen struggling back to safety with tears in his eyes he cried, “My poor Orphans! My poor Orphans!” And so they shall ever be known, in the memory of their country and their descendants, as “The Orphan Brigade”.