Author Topic: What is in my Father's notebook?  (Read 3026 times)

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What is in my Father's notebook? Page 17
« Reply #120 on: November 17, 2018, 09:01:17 PM »
Page 17 continues the discussion on The Development of the Torpedo and talks about Robert Fulton and Captain Bushnell of
"Bushnell's Turtle" fame



Page 17

My Father's Navy
« Reply #121 on: November 17, 2018, 09:22:06 PM »
All recruits to the US Navy were given a reference guide called The Bluejacket's Manual  The one my Father would have received would have been the 1940 10th Edition (from what I can tell the latest version issued to today's recruits is the 25th edition).   The manual was an introduction to the Navy and was also a reference guide.  It discusses uniforms, regulations, boats under oars, characteristic of ships, drills, first aid, swimming, seamanship, gunnery, knots, etc.

Here is what it would have looked like and I've included the Table of Contents








Re: My Father's Navy
« Reply #122 on: November 18, 2018, 04:19:25 AM »
After an encounter that seemed worrisome, servicemen were supposed to use a special kit that told them to
wash everything down thoroughly with soap and water and then inject a tube of gunk  up their fuselage and then
massage the gunk in for several minutes.   :o

Yikes... None of that sounds fun- not even massaging the gunk for several minutes.  :o


What is in my Father's notebook? Page 18
« Reply #123 on: November 19, 2018, 08:19:28 PM »
Page 18 continues on with the discussion of the development of the torpedo.   It lists 3 of the 4 types of early torpedoes -
drifting, towing and spar.

Page 18


Re: My Father's Navy
« Reply #124 on: November 19, 2018, 08:27:08 PM »
Yikes... None of that sounds fun- not even massaging the gunk for several minutes.  :o

Well there is a movie.   It doesn't hold anything back and as such, I don't recommend following the link below:

https://www.pond5.com/stock-footage/74967383/soldier-enters-united-states-army-prophylactic-station-and-u.html

My Father's Navy
« Reply #125 on: November 19, 2018, 10:45:11 PM »
At the time that my Dad joined the US Navy, there were seventeen Battleships in commission plus one that had been defrocked due to the naval treaties.  Three of these vessels were at the bottom of Pearl Harbor and would never sail again.   That left fourteen and of those , six were also damaged during the Pearl Harbor attack but not to the extent to where they would not be repaired and placed back in service. 

By law, the Battleships were named after states and almost all of the US Navy's BB's were launched just prior, to  during or just after WWI.  These included the USS Arkansas (Wyoming Class) [BB-33], USS New York [BB - 34] (New York Class), USS Texas [BB - 35] (New York Class), USS Nevada [BB - 36] (Nevada Class), USS Oklahoma [BB - 37] (Nevada Class), USS Pennsylvania [BB - 38] (Nevada Class), USS Arizona [BB - 39] (Nevada Class), USS New Mexico [BB - 40] (New Mexico Class), USS Mississippi [BB - 41](New Mexico Class), USS Idaho [BB - 42](New Mexico Class), USS Tennessee [BB - 43](Tennessee Class), USS    California (Tennessee Class), USS Colorado [BB - 45] (Colorado Class), USS Maryland [BB - 46] (Colorado Class), USS West Virginia [BB - 48](Colorado Class)    The launch dates for these vessels ranged from 1911 to 1921.   With their tall, ungainly gunnery towers and range dials. they definitely had a less than modern almost steam punk kind of a vibe to them.  These ships would be reworked and upgraded during the war really ended up with quite a different appearance by wars end.

The US Navy also had two new Fast Battleships that were launched in 1940.  When one thinks of an American Battleship this is the type that pops into mind.  They were the  USS North Carolina [BB - 55] (North Carolina Class)  and the USS Washington [BB - 56]  (North Carolina Class). They were quite beautiful - so much so, that theNorth Carolina was known as the Showboat. 

There was also the USS Utah [BB-31/AG-16] (Florida Class) which had been a Battleship but was stripped of her guns due to the Naval Treaties and used as a target vessel and for training.

Considered the backbone of the fleet, the main armament of these ships or "Battle Wagons" as they were sometimes called, ranged from 12 inch guns on the USS Arkansas to 16 inch on North Carolina Class.  They were the heavy weights in a naval surface action where the opposing fleets would duke it out in a naval artillery duel.  Ironically the US Navy's Battleships would be mostly used for shore bombardments prior to an invasion or for anti-aircraft duties to help protect the Aircraft Carriers.  When the US Navy needed them the most, during the surface actions off of Guadalcanal, the WWI era Battleships would be left at anchor in San Diego.   This was due to their tremendous fuel requirements.  America was fighting a two front war and keeping the British afloat and there was only so much fuel oil to go around at the time and only so many Fleet Oilers to provide it.  The newer North Carolina Class ships would be used off of Guadalcanal but it would be up to the American Cruisers to slug it out with the Imperial Japanese Navy and the Cruisers would take a beating.

The US Navy permanently lost two Battleships at Pearl Harbor,  the USS Oklahoma and the USS Arizona (along with the Target Ship Utah).  However, after that, they would never lose another one.   Today only four of the ships mentioned that were in commission at the time my Father joined the Navy are still in existence.  Two are museum ships, USS Texas and USS North Carolina and two are grave sites and memorials at Pearl Harbor USS Utah and USS Arizona.   I've seen three of the four but to date have not had the chance to visit the USS Texas.  The Arizona and Utah are somber experiences.  Especially the Arizona as you look down and realize that there a thousand men trapped under the water below you.  The North Carolina is rather awesome.  Unlike the Missouri or Wisconsin, the North Carolina was not really modernized after the war, so she pretty much appears as she did at the time she was built - all the anti-aircraft guns are there, along with the scout aircraft mounted on a catapult on the stern. 


WWI Era BB's
USS Arkansas [BB - 33]


USS California [BB - 44]


USS Nevada [BB - 36]
1941 Appearance

1944 Appearance



Fast Battleship's
USS North Carolina [BB - 55]




16 Inch Battleship Shell



Ships as they appear today
USS Utah


USS Arizona


USS Texas


USS North Carolina - The Showboat



What is in my Father's notebook? Page 19
« Reply #126 on: November 20, 2018, 09:28:52 AM »
Page 19 continues on with the development of the torpedo topic.   At this point, it is up to 1870 and the development of the US Navy's
Howell Torpedo of 1870.



Page 19

Re: My Father's Navy
« Reply #127 on: November 22, 2018, 01:53:26 AM »
Well there is a movie.   It doesn't hold anything back and as such, I don't recommend following the link below:

https://www.pond5.com/stock-footage/74967383/soldier-enters-united-states-army-prophylactic-station-and-u.html

Possibly what struck me was the fact that they actually manufactured those misshapen sinks in order to catch the water and soap dripping when you straddled them- they did not look like add-on's.

Re: My Father's Navy
« Reply #128 on: November 22, 2018, 02:09:22 AM »
Ships as they appear today
USS Utah


USS Arizona



On the day that I visited Pearl Harbor Trump was arriving, and they had to close early.  I did get to see most of it- but I am really happy to have made it out to the Arizona.  You are correct that it is a hell of an experience and leaves you in awe.  It was an experience that I am unlikely to forget.  Regrettably, I did not get to the Utah (I also don't think you were allowed to go out as the general public...)

I did get to visit the Missouri, and I spent quite a lot of time wandering.  That would be a completely foreign existence- and not one that I would likely volunteer for.  My grandfather said the he joined the Luftwaffe because he didn't care for infantry with the up close fighting, and did not care for the thought of being at sea a thousand kilometers from anything with your only safety sinking from under you.  I don't know if it was because he said that when I was young and impressionable, or if I would have reached that conclusion on my own- but I could not see myself in those bunks cut off from the world.  I wonder what your fathers impression of his time on board was?




What is in my Father's notebook? Page 20
« Reply #129 on: November 23, 2018, 06:50:00 PM »
The Development of the Torpedo lecture  still continues on with Page 20.  It discusses the period when the U.S. Navy utilized the
Whitehead Torpedo from Britain.



Page 20



Re: My Father's Navy
« Reply #130 on: November 23, 2018, 07:02:43 PM »
Possibly what struck me was the fact that they actually manufactured those misshapen sinks in order to catch the water and soap dripping when you straddled them- they did not look like add-on's.

They sure look designed and built for that very purpose do they not?   Which also means some guy or gal was building them in a plant somewhere.

"What did you do during "The War" Granny?   Did you build airplanes?"      How do you answer that with a straight face? 

Re: My Father's Navy
« Reply #131 on: November 23, 2018, 07:34:04 PM »
On the day that I visited Pearl Harbor Trump was arriving, and they had to close early.  I did get to see most of it- but I am really happy to have made it out to the Arizona.  You are correct that it is a hell of an experience and leaves you in awe.  It was an experience that I am unlikely to forget.  Regrettably, I did not get to the Utah (I also don't think you were allowed to go out as the general public...)

I did get to visit the Missouri, and I spent quite a lot of time wandering.  That would be a completely foreign existence- and not one that I would likely volunteer for.  My grandfather said the he joined the Luftwaffe because he didn't care for infantry with the up close fighting, and did not care for the thought of being at sea a thousand kilometers from anything with your only safety sinking from under you.  I don't know if it was because he said that when I was young and impressionable, or if I would have reached that conclusion on my own- but I could not see myself in those bunks cut off from the world.  I wonder what your fathers impression of his time on board was?

My visit to the Utah was pre-9/11 so a tour boat would just boogie on out right next to her.  I'm sure that is long gone now!

After High School my Dad spent a year and half in the Civil Conservation Corp (CCC) and caught a real tough break.  He ended up in the Seney Wildlife Refuge way up in Northern Michigan reclaiming wetlands that had been drained decades before.   So he had more than enough of working in mud and slop.  There was no separate Air Force branch then in the US armed forces so I don't think there was any guarantee
of ending up there.  One of my Father's brothers was a crack shot and he ended up as a gunner on a B-24 (Perhaps he tangled with your Grandfather?), one ended up in the infantry and had an absolutely horrible time in Burma, one spent his time never leaving the country and guarded P.O.W.'s., and another who had worked for Packard ended up on some little atoll in the Pacific working on Packard engines. 

As an aside, my Mom was still in High School during the war and tells a story of Italian P.O.W.s being locked up not far away.  So they would have a bunch of Italians hanging on a fence hooting and hollering at school girls.   Not sure who thought that was a good idea.

If you were to ask him, Dad would have said that overall his shipboard experience was not terrible. By pure chance the Cook on the destroyer that he served on for the longest time period was someone that he had played High School baseball against.  So "Cookie" always had something a little special set aside for Dad. 
 
Seney Wildlife Refuge

My Father's Navy
« Reply #132 on: November 23, 2018, 07:51:36 PM »
It certainly was not extravagant but Destroyermen had a clean, dry place to sleep:


Re: My Father's Navy
« Reply #133 on: November 23, 2018, 09:13:21 PM »
My visit to the Utah was pre-9/11 so a tour boat would just boogie on out right next to her.  I'm sure that is long gone now!

After High School my Dad spent a year and half in the Civil Conservation Corp (CCC) and caught a real tough break.  He ended up in the Seney Wildlife Refuge way up in Northern Michigan reclaiming wetlands that had been drained decades before.   So he had more than enough of working in mud and slop.  There was no separate Air Force branch then in the US armed forces so I don't think there was any guarantee
of ending up there.  One of my Father's brothers was a crack shot and he ended up as a gunner on a B-24 (Perhaps he tangled with your Grandfather?), one ended up in the infantry and had an absolutely horrible time in Burma, one spent his time never leaving the country and guarded P.O.W.'s., and another who had worked for Packard ended up on some little atoll in the Pacific working on Packard engines. 

As an aside, my Mom was still in High School during the war and tells a story of Italian P.O.W.s being locked up not far away.  So they would have a bunch of Italians hanging on a fence hooting and hollering at school girls.   Not sure who thought that was a good idea.

If you were to ask him, Dad would have said that overall his shipboard experience was not terrible. By pure chance the Cook on the destroyer that he served on for the longest time period was someone that he had played High School baseball against.  So "Cookie" always had something a little special set aside for Dad. 
 
Seney Wildlife Refuge

One hope the SOS, food not distress call, wasn't really that when Cookie served up your pa! 

I didn't quite understand one item. The eyeties who hollered at and cat-called schoolgirls were doing this as some weird type of political protest and not just as normal daily type of activity for those hot-blooded Latin types? I jest, of course.

Re: My Father's Navy
« Reply #134 on: November 24, 2018, 02:50:14 AM »
It certainly was not extravagant but Destroyermen had a clean, dry place to sleep:



That is what I mean... I could sleep in a coffin on dry land.  But looking at that, and knowing that one collision with a mine (or a torpedo) would suddenly have the water rushing in?  No thanks.

I suppose everybody has their own life experiences (slogging through the mud when young) that shape their choices.  Also everybody is allowed their own irrational (and, in my case, rational) fears that contribute to choices.

Re: My Father's Navy
« Reply #135 on: November 24, 2018, 02:54:19 AM »
One of my Father's brothers was a crack shot and he ended up as a gunner on a B-24 (Perhaps he tangled with your Grandfather?),

My grandfathers brother was a tail gunner shot down over Germany and still listed as MIA.  Given the planes that my other grandfather flew, I occasionally wonder if the possibility actually exists that he killed my great uncle?  I also sometimes think that I should ask my mother what her parents thought of her dating a Kraut.  I know they ended up friendly with the families- but they were never what I would deep close despite living only a block apart for 5 or 6 decades.

Did your parents meet before your father shipped out?

Re: My Father's Navy
« Reply #136 on: November 24, 2018, 09:31:19 PM »
My grandfathers brother was a tail gunner shot down over Germany and still listed as MIA.  Given the planes that my other grandfather flew, I occasionally wonder if the possibility actually exists that he killed my great uncle?  I also sometimes think that I should ask my mother what her parents thought of her dating a Kraut.  I know they ended up friendly with the families- but they were never what I would deep close despite living only a block apart for 5 or 6 decades.

Did your parents meet before your father shipped out?

Some interesting family history you have there WOTR.   To answer your question.  Nope - my parents didn't meet until 1946.

Re: My Father's Navy
« Reply #137 on: November 24, 2018, 09:33:25 PM »
That is what I mean... I could sleep in a coffin on dry land.  But looking at that, and knowing that one collision with a mine (or a torpedo) would suddenly have the water rushing in?  No thanks.

I suppose everybody has their own life experiences (slogging through the mud when young) that shape their choices.  Also everybody is allowed their own irrational (and, in my case, rational) fears that contribute to choices.

Dad definitely wanted a gig where his battle station was topside so he could see what was going on.  Of course you are right - you could be in
your rack when something went down and that would be it.  Locked in a room that is flooding and no way out. 

What is in my Father's notebook? Page 21
« Reply #138 on: November 24, 2018, 09:36:28 PM »
Page 21 finally finishes up the dissertation on The Development of the Torpedo with a discussion on how the Naval Bureau of Ordnance ended up taking over the the R&D and manufacture of the US Navy's torpedoes from private industry.   It also finishes with a cool little doodad thingy
that Dad added at the end.
 
Page 21

Re: What is in my Father's notebook? Page 21
« Reply #139 on: November 24, 2018, 10:02:58 PM »
Page 21 finally finishes up the dissertation on The Development of the Torpedo with a discussion on how the Naval Bureau of Ordnance ended up taking over the the R&D and manufacture of the US Navy's torpedoes from private industry.   It also finishes with a cool little doodad thingy
that Dad added at the end.
 
Page 21


Yes, that is an interesting sketch.  A swooping bird or a torpedo skimming over the waves?

My Father's Navy
« Reply #140 on: November 24, 2018, 11:25:35 PM »
At the time my Dad joined, the US Navy had 18 heavy cruisers in commission.  The idea behind a heavy cruiser was that it would be fast, have a long cruising range, could dish out good blows with 8" guns and could take a punch.  Heavy Cruisers were named after U.S. cities and went by the designation of CA for Cruiser Armored.  Almost 40% of these 18 ships would be lost during the war - ouch.

The lineup looked like this:   Pensacola Class (2) - USS Pensacola CA-24, USS Salt Lake City CA-25   both would survive the war,
Northhampton Class (6) - Half of these would be lost.   USS Northhampton (CA-26), USS Chester (CA-27), USS Louisville (CA-28), USS Chicago (CA-29), USS Houston (CA-30), USS Augusta (CA-31).   New Orleans Class (7) - three of these would be lost during a single night. USS New Orleans (CA-32), USS Astoria (CA-34), USS Minneapolis (CA-36), USS Tuscaloosa (CA-37), USS San Francisco (CA-38), USS Quincy (CA-39), USS Vincennes (CA-44).    Portland Class (2) - one of these would be lost. USS Portland (CA-33) and USS Indianapolis (CA-35).    Witchita Class (1) - none would be lost USS Wichita (CA-45)


The USS Houston would die first. She was the flagship of the US Navy's Asiatic fleet with a home port in the Philippines. She would be involved in three battles shortly after the start of the war.  With the Philippines as lost cause, she was sent to the Dutch East Indies to become the cornerstone of the US's contribution to the ABDA (American British Dutch Australian) command that was slapped together to try and save the oilfields of the Dutch East Indies from the Japanese.  The Houston was lost at the Battle of Sunda Straight on March 1st, 1942.  Most of the British, Dutch and Australian ships that were lost off of modern day Indonesia have been pillaged for scrap metal and souvenir hunters.  The US Navy has to keep an eye on the poor Houston before it too is totally raped and the graves of the 700 men aboard her are violated.

USS Houston


Here is a trumpet that was pilfered off of the USS Houston and subsequently recovered by the Navy


The night of August 9th, 1942 would be a bleak one for the US Navy as they tried to protect the Marines on Guadalcanal.  Three Heavy Cruisers would be lost (taking two Admirals with them) - USS Astoria, USS Quincy and USS Vincennes

USS Astoria


USS Quincy



USS Vincennes



The USS Northhampton would be sunk on November 30, 1942 at the Battle of Tassafaronga  again protecting the Marines on Guadalcanal.

USS Northhampton


USS Chicago would be lost Battle of Rennell Island on January 30, 1943 as Guadalcanal was winding down.

USS Chicago




The final heavy cruiser lost was USS Indianapolis of Jaws fame.  She was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine on July 30th, 1945 with a massive loss of life. 

USS Indianapolis







Re: What is in my Father's notebook? Page 21
« Reply #141 on: November 25, 2018, 02:10:30 AM »
Page 21 finally finishes up the dissertation on The Development of the Torpedo with a discussion on how the Naval Bureau of Ordnance ended up taking over the the R&D and manufacture of the US Navy's torpedoes from private industry.   It also finishes with a cool little doodad thingy
that Dad added at the end.
 
Page 21

I seem to recall you mentioning that the torpedo at the start of the war did not have a great record (accuracy?)  He ends off with saying that they can hit a target at 10 miles.  I'm guessing this means that they had an effective rage of 10 miles (though with reference to the gyroscope, it seems to infer that they could be accurate to 10 miles.)

Do you have any info on how accurate they actually were at any given range?  I assume, also that they evasive maneuvers would help to reduce the likelihood of hitting your target- but assuming the ship was making a bee-line would it be expected to score a "hit" at 5 miles?

What is in my Father's notebook? Page 22 & 23
« Reply #142 on: November 25, 2018, 07:19:10 PM »
I've combined Page 22 and Page 23 into a single post as they seem to be a review for a quiz on the older Mark VIII Torpedo.  Written in blue ink.

Page 22


Page 23

Re: What is in my Father's notebook? Page 21
« Reply #143 on: November 25, 2018, 08:41:39 PM »
I seem to recall you mentioning that the torpedo at the start of the war did not have a great record (accuracy?)  He ends off with saying that they can hit a target at 10 miles.  I'm guessing this means that they had an effective rage of 10 miles (though with reference to the gyroscope, it seems to infer that they could be accurate to 10 miles.)

Do you have any info on how accurate they actually were at any given range?  I assume, also that they evasive maneuvers would help to reduce the likelihood of hitting your target- but assuming the ship was making a bee-line would it be expected to score a "hit" at 5 miles?

The range was a function of speed.  If the torpedo was set to run at it's top speed of 45 knots then its range would be about 3 1/2 miles, when set at a lower speed it could be extended out to about 10 miles.  As for "hit-rate" info the best I have found was for American submarines where a top skipper might get a hit on 40% of his shots.  Destroyer launched torpedoes would be much less.  Unless by chance you somehow caught the enemy unaware, more than likely they are aware of your presence and changing course and speed.  However, if the target was was keeping a steady course and speed, I'd imagine that launching a spread of 5 fish there would be a good chance of a bingo at 5 miles.  I'll dig more to see if I can get more concrete info. 

At the beginning of the war there were several major issues with the US Navy torpedoes.  The first was that they would run about 15 feet too deep.  The sailors in the fleet reported this back to the Bureau of Ordinance in Newport, Rhode Island but the MIT types decided that there was no issue and that the Torpedomen in the fleet were all thumbs.    Finally after enough bitching they looked into it.  Eventually the root cause was found in a design flaw in it's depth control mechanism.   It was not found in BuOrd's testing as the MIT types at Newport used some sort of whiz bang device to record depth based on pressure.  The device was dead accurate but unfortunately placed in a spot in the torpedo where the pressures involved would not reflect the true depth. A simpler test would be to simply hang a net down and fire the torpedo through the net and
get out the tape measure.  This was done but when there were discrepancies in the data between the net and the depth device, it was thought that the net must be in error - currents and such.     ::)

Another major issue was the magnetic exploder.  The idea was that the torpedo would pass underneath a ship and when a change in the magnetic field was noted, the torpedo would explode directly under the ship.  This would create a massive shockwave and break the back of the targeted vessel and sink it instantly.   The issue here was there was that this was developed and tested in the waters off of Rhode Island.  Unfortunately, the Earth's magnetic field is not a constant and what worked in Newport may not work the same in the South Pacific and the torpedoes would explode too early.  There was also a glitch where the torpedo might simply explode when it armed itself.   Eventually the fleet just disabled this feature in the torpedoes against orders. 

Until that was done, this kind of thing happened all to often:


The biggest issue of all was an issue with the contact exploder.  Here the torpedo was supposed to explode when striking the side of the enemy ship.  Everything would go perfectly - the fish would hit the target dead on and nothing would happen.  Again the brains at BuOrd blamed the torpedomen in the fleet for not calibrating the exploders properly.  Finally a Sub skipper fired a number of torpedoes into a sheer cliff on the island of Kauai.  When one failed to exploded, some crazy diver went down and recovered the head of the faulty torpedo.  This was sent back to Newport as proof that there really was an issue.   There were some sympathetic ears at BuOrd and one of them reached out to none other than Albert Einstein for help - you can see Einstein's response here.   Einstein diagnosed the issue correctly and proposed a perfectly workable solution.  Upon striking the side of the ship, a portion of the contact exploder would deform and thus not trigger properly.  Of course, the MIT types at BuOrd told Einstein to get stuffed and it would be sometime before they came up with a fix that was "invented here". 

The Mark XIV torpedoes that the US Submarines used also had a flaw where the gyroscope might go haywire and  cause the fish to circle back.
The destroyer launched Mark XV  had a protection against this.    A diagram of what is supposed to happen with the gyroscope is given below.






What is in my Father's notebook? Mechanical Drawing tools
« Reply #144 on: November 25, 2018, 09:17:27 PM »
We shall soon hit the first hand drawn mechanical drawing in Dad's notebook.   So as a prelude, I'd thought I'd share some pictures of his drafting tools.   They are stamped Friedmann and were made in Germany.  I'd imagine that they cost him a pretty penny.  They are beautifully made.






What is in my Father's notebook? Page 24
« Reply #145 on: November 26, 2018, 08:51:38 PM »
Page 24 contains the first drawing. 

Page 24

Re: What is in my Father's notebook? Mechanical Drawing tools
« Reply #146 on: November 26, 2018, 10:25:15 PM »
We shall soon hit the first hand drawn mechanical drawing in Dad's notebook.   So as a prelude, I'd thought I'd share some pictures of his drafting tools.   They are stamped Friedmann and were made in Germany.  I'd imagine that they cost him a pretty penny.  They are beautifully made.







When I first starting working in the the mid 70s, I worked with guys late in their career who had similar high quality drafting sets.  One of them graduated from a technical university in Prague in 1928, best draftsman I ever saw.

Re: What is in my Father's notebook? Mechanical Drawing tools
« Reply #147 on: November 26, 2018, 10:29:13 PM »
When I first starting working in the the mid 70s, I worked with guys late in their career who had similar high quality drafting sets.  One of them graduated from a technical university in Prague in 1928, best draftsman I ever saw.

Similar kit up for sale - $19     Guess I'm not sitting on a financial gold mine!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Friedmann-Germany-Drafting-Tool-Kit/263933676066?hash=item3d73ac4a22:g:nN8AAOSwQqhbWMY5

My Father's Navy
« Reply #148 on: November 27, 2018, 10:41:40 PM »
There would be times when sailors would be killed aboard ship:



Thus the US Navy would bury their dead at sea as there was no other workable alternative.  My Father said that there are few more emotional events in life than the first time you witness a shipmate and friend dumped over the side and hear Taps played and echoing out over the water.  He said you kind of got used to it the more it happened but that the first time was unforgettable.

The burial ceremony went like this. 
Quote
Station firing squad, casket bearers, and bugler.
Officer's call. Pass the word "All hands bury the dead" (the ships should be stopped, if practicable, and colors displayed at half-mast).
Assembly.
Adjutant's call (Call to Attention).
Bring the massed formation to Parade Rest.
Burial service.
The Scripture (Parade Rest).
The Prayers (Parade Rest, heads bowed).
The Committal (Attention, Hand Salute).
The Benediction (Parade Rest, heads bowed).
Fire three volleys (Attention, Hand Salute).
Taps. Close up colors. Resume course and speed at the last note of Taps (Hand Salute).
Encasing of the flag (Attention).
Retreat (resume normal duties).

Here are some burials during the war:


Taps played by a US Navy Bugler

Re: What is in my Father's notebook?
« Reply #149 on: November 29, 2018, 08:48:47 PM »
Great thread Walks...I used a smaller "green notebook" (8 x 10 1/2") Federal Supply Service #7530-00-222-3525 to write a diary while deployed to the Med in 1987.  They are bound very well but time takes it's toll ...as you are most aware.  I have used the same larger size log book (8 x 14) for years in the Philippines at specific posts.  Entries were posted every hour and sometimes closer depending on the situation.   As I have researched I often wonder what happened to all those green log books...