Author Topic: k&n filters  (Read 275 times)

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k&n filters
« on: May 08, 2018, 09:09:09 PM »
to avoid hijacking the MITD thread, i created this one.

Yeah I recall HP etc arguing that refilling ink-jets was bad, proprietary, would cause damage to machine, would void warranties etc etc.


GM still refused a repair under warranty because my cousin installed K&N air filter not OEM and since guy had already put VIN in the 'system' the 'known issue' wasn't covered. I don't know all the details but the guy implied if he would've replaced the K&N before he took it in the warranty would've covered the issue but K&N was considered a "modification" since it is a different type. And that was just an air-filter?
that particular air filter brand advertises itself as "increasing horsepower" and thus a OEM is well within its rights to refuse warranty service on any (potential) problems caused by said air filter. that is clearly stated in the warranty declaration.
more details at the end.



Stay away from K&N air filters on anything but collector type (limited use) cars that are typically used only on fair weather days.
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[size=78%]i agree 100%. [/size]

I had a mechanic who, literally, pulled the K&N filter out of my car put one in at his own expense and and proceeded to warn me not to put it back in.


I guess that the oil that the filter membrane is treated with can become airborne and get deep down into the system.  I guess it really screws up with the mixture and everything else tied in with the fuel/air mixture sensors.


Oh, I did pay for the filter but he did the change first.
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thats one problem with k&n filters. over (or perhaps perfectly) oiling results in the oil eventually ending up on sensors such as mass air flow sensor, and other sensors in the intake. which alters the fuel mixture, and can lead to engine damage ,due to inaccurate sensor readings.


the other issue is once the excess oil is drawn off (or the filter is under oiled) dirt is allowed by the filter.
k&n claims "more airflow = more power" it also = more dirt by the filter.


this is easily proven, remove the filter and thoroughly clean the airbox and intake tube(s). and i mean spotless clean. then right where the tube meets the airbox and between the filter and the engine (so the air has been "filtered"),  put a light film of grease there. after a week it will have dirt on it. might take longer in very humid environments, but it will happen. dirt in an engine = engine damage.


as far as a OEM, since K&N advertises its filters as performance, most warranties state something like "and damage due to performance enhancing parts will void the warranty on any part affected by said part" and since air goes from the filter though the engine then out the exhaust, any part the air comes into contact with may be refused warranty service by the OEM.


k&n filters
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2018, 09:13:35 PM »
to avoid hijacking the MITD thread, i created this one.


that particular air filter brand advertises itself as "increasing horsepower" and thus a OEM is well within its rights to refuse warranty service on any (potential) problems caused by said air filter. more details at the end.



[/font]
[size=78%]i agree 100%. [/size]


thats one problem with k&n filters. over (or perhaps perfectly) oiling results in the oil eventually ending up on sensors such as mass air flow sensor, and other sensors in the intake. which alters the fuel mixture, and can lead to engine damage ,due to inaccurate sensor readings.


the other issue is once the excess oil is drawn off (or the filter is under oiled) dirt is allowed by the filter.
k&n claims "more airflow = more power" it also = more dirt by the filter.


this is easily proven, remove the filter and thoroughly clean the airbox and intake tube(s). and i mean spotless clean. then right where the tube meets the airbox and between the filter and the engine (so the air has been "filtered"),  put a light film of grease there. after a week it will have dirt on it. might take longer in very humid environments, but it will happen. dirt in an engine = engine damage.


Thanks. But this IS BG and threads are derailed.  ;)
I recall theories about cutting holes in your airbox etc for "more power" and being doubtful due to all the computer tech etc these days and more dirt into the system.

k&n filters
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2018, 09:22:36 PM »
I have used K&N FIPKs and yes, the oil would eventually end up on the MAF sensor wires, plus dirt would begin to cake on the air intake tubing.

I actually installed a K&N FIPK GEN2 on a 1997 GM Vortec 350 truck and did before and after 1/4 mile runs, both elapsed time and the more telling(for power production) MPH number was unaffected.

peace
Hog


k&n filters
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2018, 05:25:45 AM »
Oiled air filters are technology from the 20s. I am old enough to have worked on cars made in the 50s and such filters were rare then. The oil coated the inside of carburetors and their jets and required rebuilds. I canít imagine what havoc the oil would cause in modern electronic engines.


k&n filters
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2018, 05:35:38 AM »
Are there any good studies on engine wear comparing Ķ&N versus paper filters ? Are they safe on classic engines ?  I see them all the time on motorcycles, but I have no idea how knowledgeable the owner is.  Is using K&N generally ŗ beginner's mistake? They must be intended for use on race days only or something.
Oiled air filters are technology from the 20s. I am old enough to have worked on cars made in the 50s and such filters were rare then. The oil coated the inside of carburetors and their jets and required rebuilds. I canít imagine what havoc the oil would cause in modern electronic engines.