Author Topic: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions  (Read 288 times)

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Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« on: April 25, 2018, 10:53:42 PM »
From about 21 through 30 I had an extremely hard time getting to sleep, and then staying asleep for more than two or three hours. Glancing at the clock every 30-60 minutes and stressing as the hours rolled by.. Couldn't quiet my mind, music playing in my head as I wrote songs etc. What an exhausting nightmare. Discovered melatonin at about 30 and that worked if I took small doses. Nothing worse than not sleeping off the shit you used to get you to sleep in the first place. Some people use gravol, it actually works but is bad stuff when taken on a regular basis.

Don't have the problem anymore and I wouldn't wish it on anyone.


My OCD keeps my yards beautiful and I build one helluva deck. I have four and I better stop because my lawn space will be compromised and I can't have that. And Oh yeah, OCD is great for your lawn! Flowers too. Speedbagging too! :D

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2018, 03:41:59 PM »
From about 21 through 30 I had an extremely hard time getting to sleep, and then staying asleep for more than two or three hours. Glancing at the clock every 30-60 minutes and stressing as the hours rolled by.. Couldn't quiet my mind, music playing in my head as I wrote songs etc. What an exhausting nightmare. Discovered melatonin at about 30 and that worked if I took small doses. Nothing worse than not sleeping off the shit you used to get you to sleep in the first place. Some people use gravol, it actually works but is bad stuff when taken on a regular basis.

Don't have the problem anymore and I wouldn't wish it on anyone.


My OCD keeps my yards beautiful and I build one helluva deck. I have four and I better stop because my lawn space will be compromised and I can't have that. And Oh yeah, OCD is great for your lawn! Flowers too. Speedbagging too! :D

All of that sounds familiar, except I've never tried melatonin. Also I don't get yardwork done, i just sit there and obsess about how I should be doing it.

In my twenties I had a system of staying up late one night and having a 'long' sleep (about 5-8 hours) the second night. I smoked an ounce of hash a week and would still just lie there fizzing if I tried to sleep more than that. You put the light on to read, you feel tired. Light off, you're so awake you could probably write a book.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2018, 08:39:33 PM »
You put the light on to read, you feel tired. Light off, you're so awake you could probably write a book.

That's the stuff. Ugh

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2018, 11:41:21 PM »

      It's all bullshit meant to make man think he is helpless. The worst aspect of my people are so many being mindbenders hooking people on their medications and expensive rap sessions.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2018, 01:02:18 AM »
      It's all bullshit meant to make man think he is helpless.
Helpless? No, was just a little sleepy for a few years.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2018, 09:37:05 PM »
That's the stuff. Ugh
All through my twenties, I had to be careful due to a tendency toward heartburn.  Then, I didn't have any from 30-45.  Around 45, I felt weird and described it to my roommate.  She said it was heartburn!  How funny I forgot how it felt after 15 years.

Alcohol messes with sleep.  And sex.

OCD can be good in small doses.  Obsessive is a little bit more tolerable than compulsive, though.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2018, 11:06:46 PM »
All through my twenties, I had to be careful due to a tendency toward heartburn.  Then, I didn't have any from 30-45.  Around 45, I felt weird and described it to my roommate.  She said it was heartburn!  How funny I forgot how it felt after 15 years.

Alcohol messes with sleep.  And sex.

OCD can be good in small doses.  Obsessive is a little bit more tolerable than compulsive, though.

Never had heartburn with any regularity, maybe twice a year and I'm grateful for that because it sucks and I feel for those who live with it as part of their life. Can't imagine that.  It's funny how it takes the 20's to kick something. It's not uncommon.

You mention alcohol, I could take that as a dig but I most certainly won't. Respectfully, I say moderate drinking some night (or day) does not mess with sex. Why do you say that? Are you mad at mildly buzzed penises?

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2018, 04:32:20 AM »
Never had heartburn with any regularity, maybe twice a year and I'm grateful for that because it sucks and I feel for those who live with it as part of their life. Can't imagine that.  It's funny how it takes the 20's to kick something. It's not uncommon.

You mention alcohol, I could take that as a dig but I most certainly won't. Respectfully, I say moderate drinking some night (or day) does not mess with sex. Why do you say that? Are you mad at mildly buzzed penises?
If alcohol doesn't depress your reproductive capacity, then that's great.  But it does that to some people.

I don't know how often or how much you drink.  But anyone who has sleep disturbances should try cutting back, to see if it helps.  I don't mean one or two drinks over a couple hours with food.  I mean if a person really enjoys a night of just drinking, then their sleep will probably be disturbed during mild dehydration, constantly having to pee, blood sugar issues, plus other effects.  I wasn't being snarky, just speaking from experience.

I know you exercise.  That should help sleep.

Sometimes simply changing the time of day you do something can help your sleep.  I generally keep caffeine to the early part of the day.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2018, 08:37:01 PM »
If alcohol doesn't depress your reproductive capacity, then that's great.  But it does that to some people.

I don't know how often or how much you drink.  But anyone who has sleep disturbances should try cutting back, to see if it helps.  I don't mean one or two drinks over a couple hours with food.  I mean if a person really enjoys a night of just drinking, then their sleep will probably be disturbed during mild dehydration, constantly having to pee, blood sugar issues, plus other effects.  I wasn't being snarky, just speaking from experience.

I know you exercise.  That should help sleep.

Sometimes simply changing the time of day you do something can help your sleep.  I generally keep caffeine to the early part of the day.
You mention caffeine. I have to keep that to weekends at no more than two cups on a single day because it taxes the hell outta my adrenaline gland and gives me far too much energy. Like being manically happy and overly productive into the late night early morning hours.  That's all fine but I have to reign it all back in for Monday.. that can be hard. As far as booze goes, I like to drink. Only in our western guilt ridden countries am I considered an alcoholic. Dehydration isn't a problem because I'm always drinking lemon water and various other healthy fluids.

Tomorrow is Friday and I will start the day off with a fresh ground/brewed coffee. Strong and black. mmmmmmmm

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2018, 01:50:01 AM »
You mention caffeine. I have to keep that to weekends at no more than two cups on a single day because it taxes the hell outta my adrenaline gland and gives me far too much energy. Like being manically happy and overly productive into the late night early morning hours.  That's all fine but I have to reign it all back in for Monday.. that can be hard. As far as booze goes, I like to drink. Only in our western guilt ridden countries am I considered an alcoholic. Dehydration isn't a problem because I'm always drinking lemon water and various other healthy fluids.

Tomorrow is Friday and I will start the day off with a fresh ground/brewed coffee. Strong and black. mmmmmmmm
Coffee does that to me too.  When I was young, espresso used to make me break out in a sweat on my forehead! I get arrythmias from caffeine (probably because I drink it fast).  So, I use mostly decaf now, and am very happy about it.  Except the price.  It's good to drink mostly decaf, because I also get caffeine from a little tea and an occasional cola.

Okay, well here's a WOT if you are interested.  I was a big sister for 18 years, you know.  Take what you like and nevermind the rest!

All I can say as for alcohol is, the slower it hits your system the better.  I honestly believe beer really is the least harmful, if you can stop before having to pee all night.  With hard liquor, I recommend food.  As for wine, I'd say be careful about which ones are high sugar, and eat non-carbs with it.  Sweet wine with nothing else at night is a recipe for nausea in the late morning, if breakfast is skipped.

Remember, resting is good for the body, even if you can't sleep.  Resting is not REM, but the body DOES take out the garbage while we rest.  If you lay quietly, you might feel areas throbbing lightly, tingling or kind of stinging very lightly, vibrating or pulsing.  Have you felt that?  It's regeneration.  Like a small spot on your shin, things like that.  Last week I had it on my face, just below and to the side of my nose.  Some sort of low sinus cleanup, I guess.  The area above your lip is very versatile material, so the body takes from there and outs the material elsewhere, I hear.  Even if you just have a quiet moment at work, your cells start their housework while they can.

The brain takes enormous resources from the body.  It's when the brain slows down that cells get cleaned out and muscle grows.  So, when I can't sleep, I stay calm and try to think of something kind of hypnotic and easy, yet difficult enough to put me to sleep when I give up.  Like mentally using each letter of the alphabet to name items in a category (doesnt have to be perfect, let the OCD relax).  Like FRUIT.  Apple, banana, cherry, dandelion, eggplant, fruit, grapefruit, heck of a grapefruit, i like fruit, jackfruit, kiwi, lemon, mango, oh some fruit, papaya, quinine?, ruby grapefruit, starfruit, and so on...  Or Too!s.  Angle, broom, cutter, door stop, electrical tester, fishline, garage door opener, helium dispenser, inverted saw (is that real?!), jackhammer...   This really helps the brain unwind and eventually taper off into sleep.

Breathing exercises are good at bedtime.

Do you pray?  If you get into the habit of saying a couple routine ritual prayers, your body will habitually know sleep follows them.  It might help to pray certain prayers at night that are different than morning.  If you don't pray, moments of mental gratitude lists and moments of "what is the best thing that could happen to me right now?" are good meditations.  There is the Our Father, or Our Abba (more accurate) prayer.  Catholics say a prayer, "Angel of God, my guardian dear, of whom God's love entrusts me to hear.  Ever this day, be at my side, to light and guard, to rule and guide.  Amen.". Those words can be Protestant by saying, "Jesus of God, my Redeemer Dear, of whom God's Gospel asks us to hear.  Ever this day, be in my heart, soul, and identity to lead and guide, protect and correct, forgive and redeem now, always and at the moment of my death.  Amen."  You can add Alleluias for praise, confessions and pleas for forgiveness, and pray for other people.  If a person doesn't know how to pray, I think it is fine to just ask God to answer the prayers that their minister or loved one prays.  I always ask to be reunited in Heaven with all the animals I have loved, or who loved me.  There's always George's Friday night prayer list.

Some people believe in the remote neural monitoring which George Orwell wrote about... not just remote neural monitoring by God, of course, and angels and demons, but perhaps by others.  So, after praying, a person can also mentally recite a "spiel" they have memorized or adapted, things they would want an eavesdropper to know.  Especially mentally describe it if you think you are the victim of a remote covert program.  Because remote neural monitors might not know they are workers in a negative program.  They might simply be told to monitor you, or fed lies about you.  Whatever technology is out there, it probably gets into all sorts of hands, since employees leak info, share tools, might share passwords with someone...  so more than one individual could be eavesdropping, and who knows who is well-intentioned from who is nefarious.  Maybe keep it kind of basic.  If you get anxiety, just say so, or try another time.  If you state your needs, it could backfire in the wrong hands.  But nothing ventured, nothing gained.  Whoever (plural) would have remote neural monitoring would probably be very powerful, for better or worse.  The emotional strain of potential neural monitoring certainly could cause anxiety, OCD, and even "forbidden thoughts".  Like quasi-racism, quasi-blasphemy, oscenity, etc...  So I explain my real values, with supporting statements such as "I voted for Obama, and Jesse Jackson, whose campaign was 'Win, Jesse, win!' by the Rainbow Coalition.". It makes me feel better to state my values, because when I get angry about the idea of neural monitoring, I am likely to mentally dump a lot of crap communication or nervous "forbidden" compulsive thoughts.  So I get my values out in the open.

Okay, well, here's another thing:  Low planes nearby have flashing lights, which shine and strobe into residents' windows.  Sometimes there are also reflections from headlights bouncing off neighbor's windows, too.  So shutting drapes is good.

Some vivid or disturbing dreams can be reduced by sleeping next to one of those battery operated color changing lights.  Because 20% of light in a room will come through your eyelids.  And the randomness of those little toys will break up the pattern of images in bad dreams.

I usually like to leave a little glow in the room, like a small dim light but not always.  Sometimes a dark room is more refreshing.  Experts say to avoid computer light or blue light before bed.  My tablet offers a "blue shade" (orange screen tint).  Something about melatonin production vs blue light.

Most people like a room to be just a tad cool, with fresh air.  Before I go to bed, I open the window all the way for a few minutes, and then shut it.  Keeping dirty cat litter, stinky socks and garbage out certainly helps, but you probably don't have that problem with your OCD.  If it's affordable, sleep with the heat up and a window actually open a little to keep the room fresh all night.  A purifier might help, and makes white noise.

I think a warm shower relaxes before bed.

Nothing helps you sleep better than clean sheets and clean, loose, flexible garments.  If you can't clean them and you need a good night's rest, at least put a beach towel down, and a clean pillow case.  Making beds is a pain, so you can use a beach towel, or get an extra flat sheet, fold it in half, and just set it on top of your normal sheet.  At the end of a week, just wash that extra sheet and the pillow cases.  Easy peasy, no corners to tuck or any strain.  Lemon juice or any kind of vinegar in the washer rinse water will make the fabric fresher.  I wouldn't use fabric softener on sheets bec it is petroleum based.  And you know sheets have to be 100% cotton!  Or all-natural, breathable fibers.

I don't know anyone else who does it, but I find that keeping a couple pieces of all-natural fabric in bed helps.  Linen is best, but cotton, flannel, silk all work.  It can be a baby blanket, a huge scarf, or a very small thin table cloth.  It's used to drape over the arms, so your arms are not bound underneath a blanket.  And the second one can go under you chin to assist with keeping the head aligned with the spine (ears over shoulders).  You have a cotton covered feather comforter, right?  That's the way to go in winter - lofty and light and warm.

A back scratcher goes a long way toward calming any pet-induced itching!

I use a lot of white noise.  Yes, it makes my ears ring a little, but it's better than hearing sharp noises in the household.  I have ear plugs like you, too.  I like the swimmer's pressure-reducing silicone ones shaped like little fins in a row.  I do play a little radio,but low and relaxing.  But not the station that starts news at 5AM.

You might want to record your sleep room.  There could be things waking you up that you don't realize, which, once you realize them, you might be able to control.  I would record the whole 8 hours and play it back on a day off, because if you just record voice-activated, you won't know what time a disturbance occurred, making it harder to understand and control.  Where I used to live, I woke up many nights feeling "an earthquake".  But it wasn't earth quakes. After recording my sleep, I found tnat each time I had woken up, a train had sounded off way far in the distance (there were no nearby trains at all!).  So, I probably was feeling the earth's vibration from the train on tracks.  Or the horn in the distance was doing PTSD on me.  After learning what was really going on, I stopped freaking out and started sleeping through it, no longer in a cycle of feeling "earthquakes".

And on your recording, you might hear you have sleep apnea which is treated in a choice of several simple and complex ways.  Or that you have a little asthma every morning in bed when rush hour picks up on a busy freeway nearby.

You Tube offers binaural beat music (brain entrainment) for almost any condition (insomnia).  Some of the You Tubes might be 8 hours long, but also there used to be a You Repeat site for repeating a recording over and over.

Acupressure can help most conditions, too.  I don't know the sleep acupressure point.

A very, very warm bath of sea salt and baking soda (just dump some in) taxes the body, makes it detoxify.  So, you'd be tired afterward.  Experts say wrap a blanket around you and sweat in bed afterward, as radiation will exit your body afterward.

Gentle stretching is helpful before sleep.

Cottage cheese has tryptophan in it, so it's not just a turkey thing!

And we all know to shut off all ringers & alerts and to keep smoke alarm batteries fresh.  And no stuffed bellies in bed!

The body runs a lot of our business without our conscious control.  You can harness the body to put itself to sleep habitually, by keeping a bedtime routine...  always doing certain gentle, slow, easy tasks before bedtime.  Like turning down the radio, opening the window for a minute of fresh air, shutting the thicker set of drapes, turning off the main lighting, setting alarms, groom, gathering what you need (phone), double check the locks, etc...  Just as my cat knows my routines before I leave, or when I go to sleep, so my muscles also know.

Isn't it funny how different people have different rhythms for their use of time?  And how those rhythms change over the decades.  I have had chronic pain since 1975.  Arthritis from a childhood injury.  As such, my body works better after the weight of the day has been upon it.  Just when the day is over, my body is ready to start.  So, when I was younger, I would simply stay up all night and get stuff done.  I had the stamina to work the next day.  And catch up on sleep after.  But now that I'm older, I just can't do that very well.  I can work all night, but only after a long nap (not exactly "the weight of the day").  So, it is frustrating to finally feel limber at bedtime, but I compensate by managing my pain carefully, with diligent physical therapy and chiropractic routines, as well as considering exercising or hot/cold showering early in the day even though it is hard on my body.  And reducing stiffness in general from day to day by not straining, and taking rest breaks from any activity.  I miss my prior weekly pain-free manic nights, I really do.  But I can reduce pain if I apply myself, and stay on a regular sleep schedule now that I'm older.

Experts say to aim to go to bed, and get up, at the same time as much as possible.  I agree. Right now, I work many different shifts, but I keep my waking and sleeping times as consistent as possibly, transitioning gradually over days off.  Your weekend caffeine allowance might not work with this.

A lot of people and animals move to a different room if they can't sleep. Try having an alternate comfy sleep spot.  Who knows?  Insomnia might be related to the way outside sounds reverberate in house walls, and going to a different room could make a big difference.

Experts say if you honestly can't rest or sleep, then get up and do stuff, then try sleeping later.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2018, 01:56:30 AM »
An alcohol molecule is an alcohol molecule.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2018, 11:27:14 AM »
An alcohol molecule is an alcohol molecule.
Exactly. 
That's why beer is the least harmful, bec it has all sorts of other carbs built-in.
That's why hard liquor is best taken slowly or with food, bec it is straight alcohol.
That's why wine and sugary mixed drinks are the most harmful, bec in addition to the alcohol, the body has to work extra hard, going into negative metabolic defecits, to prevent hyperglycemia, which unfortunately results in hypoglycemia.  So, many alcoholics deal with cravings for simple carbs all the time.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2018, 02:33:11 PM »
An alcohol molecule is an alcohol molecule.

The Glenmorangie molecules are a cut above those other riff raff. ;)

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2018, 02:34:00 PM »
My problem the past couple weeks has been parainfluenza B bronchiolitis, which, combined with the treatment for it, put me into atrial fibrillation & led to a few days' hospitaliz'n.  The treatment needed for the virus -- prednisone, other steroids, bronchodilators -- is bad for the heart & blood sugar, & seems to have reactivated my shingles -- but needs to be endured before the heart rhythm can be re-addressed.  Lately it's been causing orthopnea, so I'm not getting much sleep.m  Fortunately it's not a congestive heart failure type of orthopnea.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2018, 02:46:46 PM »
My problem the past couple weeks has been parainfluenza B bronchiolitis, which, combined with the treatment for it, put me into atrial fibrillation & led to a few days' hospitaliz'n.  The treatment needed for the virus -- prednisone, other steroids, bronchodilators -- is bad for the heart & blood sugar, & seems to have reactivated my shingles -- but needs to be endured before the heart rhythm can be re-addressed.  Lately it's been causing orthopnea, so I'm not getting much sleep.m  Fortunately it's not a congestive heart failure type of orthopnea.

Have you ever tried the herb Andrographis?

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2018, 02:48:27 PM »
My problem the past couple weeks has been parainfluenza B bronchiolitis, which, combined with the treatment for it, put me into atrial fibrillation & led to a few days' hospitaliz'n.  The treatment needed for the virus -- prednisone, other steroids, bronchodilators -- is bad for the heart & blood sugar, & seems to have reactivated my shingles -- but needs to be endured before the heart rhythm can be re-addressed.  Lately it's been causing orthopnea, so I'm not getting much sleep.m  Fortunately it's not a congestive heart failure type of orthopnea.

See what happens when you wish bad karma on a witch and her mistress?

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2018, 11:49:54 PM »
Exactly. 
That's why beer is the least harmful, bec it has all sorts of other carbs built-in.
That's why hard liquor is best taken slowly or with food, bec it is straight alcohol.
That's why wine and sugary mixed drinks are the most harmful, bec in addition to the alcohol, the body has to work extra hard, going into negative metabolic defecits, to prevent hyperglycemia, which unfortunately results in hypoglycemia.  So, many alcoholics deal with cravings for simple carbs all the time.

Gin (good stuff) and water, sometimes with a pinch of lime. https://thoughtcatalog.com/natalie-morin/2014/08/11-perfectly-good-reasons-to-drink-more-gin/


Why is this turning into a booze thread!? Can we please get on to insomnia, allergies, and mild OCD?  #gin is the nectar.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2018, 11:51:35 PM »
See what happens when you wish bad karma on a witch and her mistress?

He didn't do that.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #18 on: May 12, 2018, 12:51:22 AM »
My problem the past couple weeks has been parainfluenza B bronchiolitis, which, combined with the treatment for it, put me into atrial fibrillation & led to a few days' hospitaliz'n.  The treatment needed for the virus -- prednisone, other steroids, bronchodilators -- is bad for the heart & blood sugar, & seems to have reactivated my shingles -- but needs to be endured before the heart rhythm can be re-addressed.  Lately it's been causing orthopnea, so I'm not getting much sleep.m  Fortunately it's not a congestive heart failure type of orthopnea.
Gees, what an ordeal you've been through!  So, the experts say to sleep a bit propped up.  Sometimes my inhaker lowers my blood sugar.  What do steroidal brochodilaters do to your blood sugar?

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #19 on: May 12, 2018, 03:23:31 AM »
My problem the past couple weeks has been parainfluenza B bronchiolitis, which, combined with the treatment for it, put me into atrial fibrillation & led to a few days' hospitaliz'n.  The treatment needed for the virus -- prednisone, other steroids, bronchodilators -- is bad for the heart & blood sugar, & seems to have reactivated my shingles -- but needs to be endured before the heart rhythm can be re-addressed.  Lately it's been causing orthopnea, so I'm not getting much sleep.m  Fortunately it's not a congestive heart failure type of orthopnea.

I can't offer any words of wisdom but do wish you well. Take it easy, brother

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #20 on: May 12, 2018, 08:07:05 AM »
Have you ever tried the herb Andrographis?
No.  Should look it up for the future, thanks.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #21 on: May 12, 2018, 08:09:51 AM »
See what happens when you wish bad karma on a witch and her mistress?
All the witches I know I wish good for.  An ye harm none....

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #22 on: May 12, 2018, 08:12:03 AM »
My problem the past couple weeks has been


Are you taking any CBD oil or black elderberry extract, and if not, why?

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #23 on: May 12, 2018, 08:13:23 AM »
An alcohol molecule is an alcohol molecule.

Some come with luggage. I've seen it.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2018, 08:24:55 AM »
Gees, what an ordeal you've been through!  So, the experts say to sleep a bit propped up.  Sometimes my inhaker lowers my blood sugar.  What do steroidal brochodilaters do to your blood sugar?
I'm not taking what I'd call a steroidal bronchodilator, but am taking bronchodilators and steroids.

The prednisone I'm taking by mouth I expect to have a little of both gluco- and mineralo-corticoid action.  In the hospital I got an intravenous steroid that I believe was responsible for raising my capillary blood glucose temporarily into a moderately diabetic range.  The nurse assumed I was going to get insulin until she checked again.

Both the inhaled albuterol & vilanterol (mixed with fluticasone) as beta adrenergic agonists can be expected to raise blood sugar and heart rate a little.  Forget about getting out of A fib until this disease & course of rx's cleared out.  A week ago on discharge I was cardioverted electrically, but as the cardiologist feared, a couple hourse after I got home I'd lapsed back into A fib due to the disturbance (coughing, etc.) in my chest.  I'm weak as is, but the A fib makes me that much the weaker.

Fortunately the shingles reactiv'n is in the form of numbness rather than pain, same nerves as in 2012.  At least I think it's shingles rather than circulatory.

On top of that, an insurance issue that means I'm going to have to get emergency rx when this is over, regular insurance taking a month to switch over.  The cardiologists I'd previously seen around here just hadn't been getting enough payment on the plan I'd been on, and I'm broke.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2018, 08:26:04 AM »
Are you taking any CBD oil or black elderberry extract, and if not, why?
Guess I should look those up too.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #26 on: May 12, 2018, 03:09:47 PM »
I'm not taking what I'd call a steroidal bronchodilator, but am taking bronchodilators and steroids.

The prednisone I'm taking by mouth I expect to have a little of both gluco- and mineralo-corticoid action.  In the hospital I got an intravenous steroid that I believe was responsible for raising my capillary blood glucose temporarily into a moderately diabetic range.  The nurse assumed I was going to get insulin until she checked again.

Both the inhaled albuterol & vilanterol (mixed with fluticasone) as beta adrenergic agonists can be expected to raise blood sugar and heart rate a little.  Forget about getting out of A fib until this disease & course of rx's cleared out.  A week ago on discharge I was cardioverted electrically, but as the cardiologist feared, a couple hourse after I got home I'd lapsed back into A fib due to the disturbance (coughing, etc.) in my chest.  I'm weak as is, but the A fib makes me that much the weaker.

Fortunately the shingles reactiv'n is in the form of numbness rather than pain, same nerves as in 2012.  At least I think it's shingles rather than circulatory.

On top of that, an insurance issue that means I'm going to have to get emergency rx when this is over, regular insurance taking a month to switch over.  The cardiologists I'd previously seen around here just hadn't been getting enough payment on the plan I'd been on, and I'm broke.
Sheesh about the nurse!  I live with an insulin dependent diabetic.  She has been hospitalized four times in a year for high blood sugar.  Very serious.  In the past, high sugar coma'd her.  I wish she would drink a little vinegar water or lemon water to lower her readings, but she doesn't trust me on that.

You sure have your hands full.  In case of anither emergency, the area above your top lip is an emergency accupressure spot.  In China, if a person waits for ambukance, the press their fi gernail into that spot.

I use albuterol when necessary.  Did you say you don't consider it a steroid?  When using it, I have to watch my blood sugar from diving too low, actually.  But probably bec I have to watch that a lot anyway (makes dieting harder, since I absolutely can't fast or delay certain meals... even when I'm not hungry...)

I heard afib can thicken the blood, causing a stroke risk?  Did they address that?  Here is a link to reduce afib when it happens using just your fingers:
https://afib.newlifeoutlook.com/reflexology-for-atrial-fibrillation/

Basically, the writer says to reduce afib, massage the area where your ring finger meets your palm.  I say only do it if you need to, but don't do it when your heart is beating in good rhythm, like don't mess with a good thing...)

Also, while massaging that area, feel for any painful little places, even with the hard edge of your fingernail.  If you find an achy spot, take a deep breath to oxygenate your blood, exhale, and while finishing your exhale, press down hard on the achy spot with your fingernail or something durable like the a plastic tip of a cap of a pen.  Hold the pressure a few moments, then release the pressure and start over, inhaling deeply, exhaling, and pressing hard through the exhale. Of course don't press so hard as to injure.  After a couple/few times, the achy slot should clear out, and not be achy at all when touched.  These are the basic principles of homemade accupressure, which I learned from a variety of providers of medical massage.

For my own mild, occasional afib, I learned to activate my vegas nerve (so it will activate the nervous system to regulate to heartbeat).  It's very easy.  I just breathe naturally and gently "bear down" in the chest/diaphragm area.  Remembering not to hold my breathe, but to hold the inner pressure for a moment, and repeat just a few times.  Women who do this should be careful not to bear down everything!  Like go easy below the waist.  Because women can develop
prolapsed uteruses, anuses, and other organs because their womb and vagina are hollow.  Things coukd dent in, cave in, etc...  I don't know if bearing down below the waist is any risk for men, but in any case, who the heck hasn't used bearing down at some point or other, usually to supress a deep cough or go number two on the toilet on a rough day!

Bearing down in the chest area has also simply stopped afib and asthma attacks in their tracks for me.  So does breathing in over the honey container.  Like a miracle.  Also, to stop the kind of coughing where it is dry and you can't seem to stop, Asians hold their earlobs, putting pressure on the lobe from behind and front whike sort of tugging the lobs down just a little.  So, each hand up to each lobe, press-piǹch, and pull dow a little.  Only takes a few moments to calm a cough thag feels out-of-control.

Sometimes there is less afib when sleeping on one side, as opposed to sleeping on the other.

And I'm sure you know what caffeine does!

is a link to music frequencies designed to help.
Here is a good set of search results too: https://m.youtube.com/results?search_query=Binaural+beats+afib

http://www.luminanti.com/tforgans.html and other business sell tuning forks designed to heal different organs in the body.  This idea has been around a long time.

Some people chant certain vowels to reduce afib, I think the "ah" sound?  I've tried this, didn't hurt.  And green is the heart chakra color, so gaze upon the lawn or trees...
https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=VxpDO9ci&id=9B341F83D0BEE0724F4417DEEBA74024080C97AD&thid=OIP.VxpDO9cidcxI2TQ1_oNr3wAAAA&q=Chakra+Sounds&simid=608021810700486416&selectedIndex=0&ajaxhist=0

Afib gives me agitation and fear by its nature.  I mean, to me, afib feels exactly like what you feel when you think someone is acting destructive to me, eve psychologically destructive.  You get that dread beat, most of the time, then those skipped beats while your heart tries to pump more blood to your brain than it can pump in one beat, and then the missing beats or racing beats, all of which is simply an enormous psychological stress.  I CAN CALM IT DOWN FAST with an over the counter Super Supplements homeopathic Calms Forte pill by Hylands.  Or strong and very warm chamomile or mint tea.  At least enough to calm down so I can function, or sleep.  If a person is weak, activity might not be possible, but if I respond to afib with housework or other moderate activity (as long as the afib is not disabling though), the sometimes I feel better.  Like harnessing the rush.  But not during weakness?  "Don't trouble trouble!". But on days when you feel strong, does movement help a little?

Some people swear by a little chocolate each week.  But chocolate is caffeine.  But it is high in magnesium too, which is probably the key.  As an electrically charged mineral in the heart.  As an electrolyte.  You've probably seen the all, but here is a short informative video:


In case you don't have this, here are foods high in magnesium:
https://www.bing.com/search?pc=AUWI&form=AMZNS1&q=foods+high+in+magnesium

I'm glad you are able to post.  Now I see why you weren't posting as much.  Weakness is really something.  I had intermittent and very frequent weakness bad, after getting shocked bad by a hair dryer.  Funny, though, at times I was too weak to drive, but on the other hand, I had amazing strength endurance at other times during the same period.  Like, one day I would sleep with my door unlocked in case I needed to call paramedics.  But then another day I could drill 20 holes over my head on a ladder to install curtain rods.  Weird as heck.  Maybe blood sugar issues were part of it, as that weakness corrects immediately after eating.  I never had any serious blood sugar issues before that electrical shock injury.  I'll take ordinary pain almost any day over weakness.  Pain sucks, but weakness just changes everything.

One of the reasons I started this dieting thread is that losing weight would increase my strength.  I'm not a wimp, but I could do a lot better for myself.  Also I really enjoy helping people, and I could potentially do a lot more of that if I weren't already carrying "sacks of potatoes" inside me!  The economy is hard for low wage workers, and we are expected to bust our patooties to get work accomplished.  Everyone is doing the work that two-four people used to do.  A lot of positions which used to have stools now are required to stand all day.  Fatigue mats for feet are disappearing u der the new "minimalism", while concrete is in and linoleum is out.  The younger generation works through their breaks, making older people or people with medical conditions look like less valuable employees.  Even though we are resources in experience, maturity, and adaptability because we have been aroud and know more.  Anyhow, point is that if I appeared to be stronger, it would be good for employability.  I actually am pretty strong as long as I don't skip meals and keep my blood sugar in the normal range, but strength is not what people see when they first interview me.  So losing excess weight is a goal.
__________________________________

HOW I FEEL ABOUT MY SUSTAINABLE DIET TODAY:
I'm motivated to lose weight because I want to get off these blood pressure pills.  They have side effects, and potential side effects.  Also, I work in healthcare around senior citizens, so I see by looking at them what my (and most people's) future holds.  I see that the leaner ones have more freedom.  Overweight is not a person's fault necessarily.  Diabetics, hypoglycemics, and people with endocrine (hormone) disorders gain weight because their bodies don't burn fat very well.  I have had polycystic ovary syndrome since age 13, and for some crazy reason, it happens to be an insulin disorder which actually creates obesity.  So, I am at a disadvantage from the start, having to abstain and exercise way more than the average lady, and for less results, too.  I feel a little bitter about that.  But on the other hand, I know I CAN do better.  I might not be able to vet as thin as when I was dancing and drinking for hours every night.  Or not as thin as when I had no car and had to walk everywhere before the hazards of sedentaty jobs set in.  But I can build activity into my job tasks.  I can manage my pain to reduce stress eating.  I can outlast a craving even if it means just pulling the car over and waiting 40 minutes before I can trust myself not to enter an ice cream isle.  There are many things I can do to regain some control over my weight.

When I was 18, I ate dinner with a different family one night. On my dinner plate, I had a serving of rice, a serving of beas, and a serving of vegetables.  I felt content.  But I looked at thehouse mother's plate, and she had beans covering her entire plate, with the rice and veggies on top.  And she was a huge woman, and miserable, with a husband who never came home.  I felt it was wrong of her to put so much on her plate, with no white space at all between servings.  But you know, over the years, I have become just like her, and plus dessert too!  Every excuse in the book, every rationalization, plenty of valid reasons to stress eat or make food enjoyment a priority.  But also, I remember her now, I have become like her and so many other middle aged women, and I just don't want to be quite like all that.

Also, I hate it when boyfriends notice a change in body weight.  I just hate it.  So, like, let's just get this over with.  I am the same person before and after, but you know they can't help but like the change.  Even if he doesn't say anything, I can tell he has an interest in the change and it just galls me!  Love me now more than you ever will, dude.  I don't wanna think about it!  So the sooner this is behind me, the better.  My issue, admittedly, but very real.  Like how a boy feels with a new haircut or new white walking shoes.  Cringe-y.  Get some dirt on them and get over with.

There are signs of weight loss today, although I have no access to a scale.  I'm glad I was too tired to buy the ice cream I craved last night, and that there was none in the household freezer, because I honestly would have felt heavy today.
 







Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #27 on: May 12, 2018, 03:14:57 PM »
I wish she would drink a little vinegar water or lemon water to lower her readings, but she doesn't trust me on that.

Try keeping it out of the microwave.



Guess I should look those up too.

You could spend an hour or two just reading on CBD--it's all the rage in Paris these days--but I'll cut you to the chase on the elderberries. I've read that a compound found in the extract coats virus particles, and inhibits their reproduction. In my experience, it may well actually do that, and it's relatively cheap and utterly delicious. Have it on your pancakes and your sponge bath.

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #28 on: May 12, 2018, 05:55:17 PM »
Try keeping it out of the microwave.



You could spend an hour or two just reading on CBD--it's all the rage in Paris these days--but I'll cut you to the chase on the elderberries. I've read that a compound found in the extract coats virus particles, and inhibits their reproduction. In my experience, it may well actually do that, and it's relatively cheap and utterly delicious. Have it on your pancakes and your sponge bath.
CBD oil is not safe for pets, especially when eaten.
Where are elderberries sold?

Re: Bouts with Insomnia, OCD & Other Afflictions
« Reply #29 on: May 12, 2018, 08:17:31 PM »
I use albuterol when necessary.  Did you say you don't consider it a steroid?
Different class of drug.
Quote
I heard afib can thicken the blood, causing a stroke risk?
No, it does not thicken blood.  It does not change its rheology.  It does incur a stroke risk because of turbulence in the atria leading to clot formation.  That's why I've been on the anticoagulant Eliquis since my 1st episode of A fib in 2015.
Quote
Afib gives me agitation and fear by its nature.
Just makes me weak & unsteady.