Author Topic: The Spaceflight Thread  (Read 2578 times)

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Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #150 on: February 15, 2018, 09:14:42 PM »
Best angle yet. One continuous shot from launch to landing.


Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #151 on: February 15, 2018, 09:21:12 PM »
Serious telephoto lens on this one. Shot with a Meade 8” LX200 telescope. 2000mm f/8 focal length lens. F/6.3 reducer.  Computer controlled  tracking via Teletrak. Amazing.


Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #152 on: February 15, 2018, 09:31:04 PM »
Best angle yet. One continuous shot from launch to landing.



Anyone know the distance from the launch pad to the (water?) tower to the left of the pad?

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #153 on: February 15, 2018, 09:39:27 PM »
Looks about 1/2 mile from 39a to the Atlantic Ocean.


Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #154 on: February 15, 2018, 09:43:46 PM »
Serious telephoto lens on this one. Shot with a Meade 8” LX200 telescope. 2000mm f/8 focal length lens. F/6.3 reducer.  Computer controlled  tracking via Teletrak. Amazing.


Awesome. The guy's comments at the end pretty much sum it up....

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #155 on: February 15, 2018, 11:03:54 PM »
Looks about 1/2 mile from 39a to the Atlantic Ocean.



Seeing the tower that close (relatively) to the launch pad gives me a queasy feeling in the pit of my stomach contemplating the modeling and vibrational analysis that went into its design knowing the immense power of the rocket at launch.  Terms like "spring constants" and "dampening ratios" come back to mind......

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #156 on: February 15, 2018, 11:29:55 PM »
a queasy feeling in the pit of my stomach [...] immense power of the rocket at launch

A) "That's what she said."

B) What can rockets accomplish that anti-gravity cannot? Asking for a friend.

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #157 on: February 15, 2018, 11:32:50 PM »
A) "That's what she said."

B) What can rockets accomplish that anti-gravity cannot? Asking for a friend.

You're asking someone who doesn't even think accurate memory is possible. How could he ever know of anti-gravity let alone rockets? He's just waiting for them to tell him what to think next. ;)

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #158 on: February 16, 2018, 12:44:58 PM »
https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/02/three-years-of-sls-development-could-buy-86-falcon-heavy-launches/
"
The Falcon Heavy is an absurdly low-cost heavy lift rocket The new SpaceX rocket seriously undercuts its competitors."

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #159 on: February 28, 2018, 05:55:28 PM »
The Core Stage consists of five major structural elements, the forward skirt, the liquid oxygen (LOX) tank, the intertank, the liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank, and the engine section.

New NASA graphic of the Core Stage(CS) of SLS(Space Launch System)


Just a few shots:

 SLS Block-1 will look like this:



Here is the Intertank STA(Structural Test Article) just before being loaded onto the newly jumboised Pegasus barge and floated from Michoud to the Marshal Space Flight Center for structural testing.  The intertank is the portion of the core stage that connects the LOX(Liquid Oxygen) and LH2(Liquid Hydrogen) tanks together.  From Feb 22, 2018



And the ready for structural testing LOX STA(Liquid Oxygen Structural Test Article) built at Michoud Assembly Facility(MAF-where the Saturn-V was assembled and where Space Shuttle External Tanks were built) The tank has just been primered, the actual flight tanks will also be covered with Spray On Foam Insulation(SOFI)


Here is a massive LH2 tank in Cell D of the MAF. This is an actual flight tank.


Building 110 at Michoud, many tanks "In Process"


And the newly built 221 foot structural test stand (4693) where the LH2 tanks will be/have been tested.  This test stand can apply millions of pounds of pull/push force and up to 340,000 pounds of shearing forces

and another


And Test Stand 4697 which tests the LOX tanks it's 85 feet tall and can exert over 9,000,000 pounds of push/pull forces and 340,000 pound shear stresses


Here is the Core Stage Forward Skirt Section.  Lots of electronics in this section


and the electronics that occupy the inside of the Forward Skirt


Here is the Core Stage Engine Section.  This is where the 4 RS25 (Space Shuttle Main Engines) will reside.  They will produce over 2 million pounds of thrust on their own, from liftoff to MECO some 8-1/2 minutes later. 2 5 segment Solid Rocket Boosters will provide an additional 3.6 million pounds of thrust each(7.2 million pounds for the pair) for the first just over 2 minutes of flight, then they will jettison in a similar manner to the Space Shuttle stack. 
The Engine Section of the Core Stage is the critical path of the core stage and is the most complicated section. Dozens of people are working this section 24 hours a day.


Areas of exposed cork applied to the outside of the Engine Section, the cork is a cheap ablative material that is used as all this hardware is "Expendable".  The cork protects the Core Stage Engine Section from radiant and convective heat generated by the 2 Solid Rocket Boosters and the 4 RS-25s themselves.


Here is the Boat Tail Assembly.  It is the very bottom part of the Core Stages Engine Section


I cant wait for a Corse Stage to ride Pegasus to Stennis Space Center where the Core Stage will be installed into the B-1 test stand for the SLS CS-1 Green-Run hotfire with 4 flight certified engines running all at once.  The B-1/B-2 stand is the same stand where the 1st stage, the S1-C was Green-Run with all 5 F-1 engines burning at once, producing 7.6 million pounds of thrust.



peace
Hog

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #160 on: March 03, 2018, 04:08:00 PM »
 The video, Without Limits from the contractors with a workforce of 15,000 people working on SLS..

Exploration Mission #1.



New EM-1 flight patch released.


peace
Hog

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #161 on: March 06, 2018, 02:24:06 PM »
Some closeup shots of the Falcon Heavy launch featuring the "raibirds" that spray hundreds of thousands of gallons of water onto the pad just after the rocket launches.  This is to keep aucoustic energy from reflecting off of the pad surface and up towards the launcher and its payload thus preventing damage. Space Explorations Falcon Heavy launched from Kennedy SPace Centers Launch Complex 39-A, the same pad where Apollo and STS missions launched from.

During STS-1 the first launch of teh SPace Shuttle, not enough water was deluged onto the pad resulting in damage to the Orbiter structure and its heat shield.  This was corrected for STS-2.
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And here are a couple pics of observatories detecting the Tesla moving through space.

The Tesla Roadster & Starman have been spotted at a record distance of 3.7 mln km on Feb 19 (nearly magnitude 20) near globular star cluster NGC 5694. (watch in the box for the moving dot)




A sooty booster after 2 flights


Closeup of titanium grid fin.



peace
Hog




Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #162 on: March 06, 2018, 04:02:29 PM »
Fake news. Everybody knows when you mix oxygen and hydrogen you get water not fire. Somebody tell Rosie.

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #163 on: March 12, 2018, 12:13:11 PM »
Fake news. Everybody knows when you mix oxygen and hydrogen you get water not fire. Somebody tell Rosie.
The Falcon 9 and Falcon heavy burn a mix of RP-1(high grade kerosene) and Liquid Oxygen.  The core stage of SLS does burn Liquid Oxygen and Liquid Hydrogen, which does indeed make water.

peace
Hog

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #164 on: March 12, 2018, 12:18:56 PM »
https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/02/three-years-of-sls-development-could-buy-86-falcon-heavy-launches/
"
The Falcon Heavy is an absurdly low-cost heavy lift rocket The new SpaceX rocket seriously undercuts its competitors."
To use the usual cliche, "game-changing."  I'm glad Musk is really pushing the boundaries.

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #165 on: March 12, 2018, 02:33:17 PM »
To use the usual cliche, "game-changing."  I'm glad Musk is really pushing the boundaries.

A testament to how much better the private sector does things.

The private sector (who must utilize efficiency, creativity, and productivity to survive)

vs

The government (who must utilize inefficiency, cost overruns, mandatory budget increases, bloated administration, polical kickbacks, union kickbacks) to survive.

But single payer government healthcrap will be great!

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #166 on: March 13, 2018, 10:50:02 AM »
Without government space, there would be no private space.  NASA does things that benefit everyone, private companies serve themselves.

peace
Hog

Re: The Spaceflight Thread
« Reply #167 on: March 13, 2018, 11:20:15 AM »
Without government space, there would be no private space.  NASA does things that benefit everyone, private companies serve themselves.

peace
Hog

 ;D



Re: Space travel alters DNA
« Reply #169 on: March 15, 2018, 01:28:00 PM »
Sorta weird:
http://denver.cbslocal.com/2018/03/13/scott-kelly-astronaut-twins-different-dna/

I dropped a vid on this in random political I think. I guess Clarke/Kubrick were right. Space is the next phase of our evolution.

Re: Space travel alters DNA
« Reply #170 on: March 15, 2018, 02:35:38 PM »
I dropped a vid on this in random political I think. I guess Clarke/Kubrick were right. Space is the next phase of our evolution.
Maybe so:
"Scott’s telomeres (endcaps of chromosomes that shorten as one ages) actually became significantly longer in space,” NASA researchers"

So you not only get taller but get longer life by going to space?

Re: Space travel alters DNA
« Reply #171 on: March 15, 2018, 02:38:26 PM »
Maybe so:
"Scott’s telomeres (endcaps of chromosomes that shorten as one ages) actually became significantly longer in space,” NASA researchers"

So you not only get taller but get longer life by going to space?

Possibly. It's intriguing.