Author Topic: Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.  (Read 46562 times)

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Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1140 on: September 19, 2019, 08:41:50 AM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/18/magazine/boeing-737-max-crashes.html

Low time, inexperienced pilots and high tech a/c is not a good combination.

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1141 on: September 19, 2019, 08:47:43 AM »
Blue Angels aircraft through the years






Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1142 on: September 19, 2019, 08:52:17 AM »


Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1143 on: September 19, 2019, 09:20:51 AM »

Back in 80s and 90s, Ethiopia was a hotbed for warbird finds.  I remember articles about Saab B17s, Fairey Fireflies, and even some between the World Wars French made biplane fighters and bombers that were found there.



Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1145 on: September 23, 2019, 12:10:06 PM »
https://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/ny-nairobi-lawmaker-stop-farting-on-airplanes-20190912-wknbvyysmrc3bgq6onrogiwm64-story.html

It's actually covered in aviation medicine/human factors info for pilots that flatulence increases with flying due to the pressure changes involved (and an airliner will be pressurised to ~8000ft so there will be a pressure change). I think it might even be discouraged to keep it in because it can lead to pain.

First result from google:
https://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/health-beauty/article/2127660/why-flying-makes-you-flatulent-how-reduce-it-and-whether


Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1146 on: September 23, 2019, 12:17:26 PM »

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1147 on: September 23, 2019, 12:55:02 PM »
It's actually covered in aviation medicine/human factors info for pilots that flatulence increases with flying due to the pressure changes involved (and an airliner will be pressurised to ~8000ft so there will be a pressure change). I think it might even be discouraged to keep it in because it can lead to pain.

First result from google:
https://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/health-beauty/article/2127660/why-flying-makes-you-flatulent-how-reduce-it-and-whether


Yeah, I agree.  I posted it just to show the stupidity of the lawmaker.

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1148 on: September 24, 2019, 04:34:34 AM »
Thought this was interesting, even if it might be untrue:



https://theaviationist.com/2019/09/04/russian-il-76md-performs-tactical-landing-on-dirt-strip-runway-escorted-by-mi-24s-in-mandatory-matsurov-mission/


Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1149 on: September 26, 2019, 12:03:35 AM »

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1150 on: September 26, 2019, 06:46:24 PM »
Maybe this should go in the "What are social justice warriors losing their shit about today?" thread, but the response to this has got me annoyed and it is aviation related:

Japan Airlines seat map helps avoid screaming babies
Quote
Japan Airlines' website says the icon "lets other passengers know a child may be sitting there". However, the airline warned the tool was not foolproof, as the icon might not appear if a ticket was booked through a third party or if there was a last-minute change of aircraft. Japan Airlines' website says the icon "lets other passengers know a child may be sitting there". However, the airline warned the tool was not foolproof, as the icon might not appear if a ticket was booked through a third party or if there was a last-minute change of aircraft.

[...]

However, other Twitter users urged people to be tolerant.
"They are babies, as we all once were. We need to learn tolerance or will soon start needing a map of seat locations for mouth breathers, droolers, farters, drunks, and perhaps a lot more things in life," said Twitter user G Sundar.
Andrew Lim said: "I used to feel and say exactly what you have just said - but after having my own son, I am very sympathetic to parents travelling with kids.
"If you're not happy with a screaming child in the cabin, then I am more than happy [for] you to try and reason with them."
Deirdra Hardimon said: "Babies are not capable developmentally to 'plan' crying or screaming." Other Twitter users said noise-cancelling headphones were the answer. Jene Johnson said: "Wow... get some noise cancelling headphones and go about your day." "I don't understand people that complain about babies crying on planes. I put on my headphones and I hear nothing."

Ah yes - let's blame other people trapped in proximity to a screaming baby for hours at a time and expect them to take extra measures instead of owning that it's the parents being inconsiderate. Let me also say that as someone who has done some very long haul flights with unruly kids in proximity, noise cancelling headphones and earplugs don't help.

The commenters seem to be missing the point that this feature will allow people to preemptively minimise their exposure to potential disturbances with no impingement on the parents. Or maybe they do get that point, but it's somehow wrong for people to not want to suffer.



https://www.bbc.com/news/business-49836599

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1151 on: September 28, 2019, 03:43:19 AM »
Here's an article about Brazil selling their aircraft carrier So Paulo, which I thought had some choice discussion of the inter-service rivalry surrounding fleet aircraft:

Brazil's Aircraft Carrier To Be Auctioned Off After Years Of Disappointment
Quote
Brazil's acquisition of So Paulo was part of a broader push on the part of the country's Navy to field a carrier-based fixed-wing tactical jet capability. This effort dated back to the 1980s and the elimination of rules that had said the Brazilian Air Force was the only service that could operate fixed-wing aircraft of any kind.

This previous inter-service arrangement had meant that the Air Force had been responsible for flying the S-2 Tracker anti-submarine warfare planes embarked on the Brazilian Navy's first aircraft carrier, the Minas Gerais, while the Navy flew helicopters from that ship's deck. This ship, another CATOBAR type, was a former U.K. Royal Navy World War II-era Colossus class carrier that Brazil had acquired from the United Kingdom in 1956.

In 1986, Minas Gerais' catapult broke and, what with having to rely on the Air Force for fixed-wing aircraft, the Navy elected not to fix it, bringing fixed-wing operations on the ship to an end for more than a decade. In 1995, Brazil began work to install a replacement catapult, acquired from Argentina after that country retired its aircraft carrier Veinticinco de Mayo, another Colossus class ship.

[...]

In the better part of two decades that the flattop had flown the Brazilian flag, she had spent just 206 days at sea.

https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/30023/brazils-aircraft-carrier-so-paulo-to-be-auctioned-off-after-years-of-disappointment






Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1152 on: September 30, 2019, 04:38:31 AM »






Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1156 on: October 03, 2019, 10:20:19 AM »

This video reminds me of a story I've heard (I'm not sure if it's true) where an aerobatics team were practicing their routine and the lead pilot made a mistake, they entered IMC, and hit the ground still in formation because they were following him. Also reminds me of this video made by the Australian aviation regulator:



Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1157 on: October 03, 2019, 11:45:08 AM »

This video reminds me of a story I've heard (I'm not sure if it's true) where an aerobatics team were practicing their routine and the lead pilot made a mistake, they entered IMC, and hit the ground still in formation because they were following him.

That happened in 1982 with the USAF Thunderbirds.  The photos of the mishap scene clearly shows they hit the ground still in their trademark diamond formation.

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1158 on: October 04, 2019, 12:42:47 PM »
trademark diamond formation

Did you mean signature, or is that actually registered? Asking for a friend.

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1159 on: October 04, 2019, 01:00:16 PM »
The missing man formation always gets to me.  It's particularly impactful when standing under it and one can actually feel the power.


Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1160 on: October 04, 2019, 01:27:43 PM »
Did you mean signature, or is that actually registered? Asking for a friend.

Don't know, but "signature" would probably have been a better choice of a word.  Tell you friend thanks for asking.

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1161 on: October 05, 2019, 02:42:59 AM »
Signature pedantry.


Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1162 on: October 06, 2019, 01:28:27 AM »

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1163 on: October 10, 2019, 08:55:30 AM »
That happened in 1982 with the USAF Thunderbirds.  The photos of the mishap scene clearly shows they hit the ground still in their trademark diamond formation.



peace
Hog

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1164 on: October 10, 2019, 10:10:18 AM »


peace
Hog

The backstory on that mishap is particularly sad.  Three months before the formation went in, the Thunderbird commander died in a mishap in Cleveland when his engines injected birds on takeoff.  He ejected within the seat's envelope, but due to a failure of a lapbelt mechanism on his seat, he was killed.  Subsequently, the formation mishap occurred when a new, inexperienced commander flew into the ground coming out of a maneuver during team training.

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1165 on: October 10, 2019, 04:57:39 PM »

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1166 on: October 10, 2019, 05:53:02 PM »
The backstory on that mishap is particularly sad.  Three months before the formation went in, the Thunderbird commander died in a mishap in Cleveland when his engines injected birds on takeoff.  He ejected within the seat's envelope, but due to a failure of a lapbelt mechanism on his seat, he was killed.  Subsequently, the formation mishap occurred when a new, inexperienced commander flew into the ground coming out of a maneuver during team training.
The new Commander apparently had a bad jet. Jammed Stabilizer on the lead jet? 

peace
Hog

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1167 on: October 10, 2019, 06:38:10 PM »
The new Commander apparently had a bad jet. Jammed Stabilizer on the lead jet? 

peace
Hog

Don't remember that, but I was more concerned with Cleveland mishap since the pilot was killed in what was a survivable accident.

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1168 on: October 10, 2019, 06:45:55 PM »
Don't remember that, but I was more concerned with Cleveland mishap since the pilot was killed in what was a survivable accident.
Did the Cleveland incident entail flight through birds?

peace
Hog

Aviation Thread - News, facts, questions, photos, videos, etc.
« Reply #1169 on: October 10, 2019, 06:50:46 PM »
Did the Cleveland incident entail flight through birds?

peace
Hog

Yes, seagulls as I recall.  He took off from Lakefront Airport.