Author Topic: Celebrity Deaths  (Read 505711 times)

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Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #690 on: October 18, 2012, 05:05:13 PM »
(I lifted this, with edits, from "Politics", and I realize that quoting oneself is probably not a good sign).

I have come to admire Senator McGovern over the years, not just for his service as a B-24 pilot in WWII, but for his stoicism in the face of defeat and personal tragedy and misfortune as well. As I recall he flew out of Italy, and there were probably more than a few things he recognized in Joseph Heller's Catch-22. It's almost certain that much of his views about Vietnam came form his personal experience with war, and his revulsion at the huge cost in lost or shattered lives for what he believed were foreign policy goals not necessary to America's vital interests.

The personal cost of his public life was very high, and IIRC he lost two adult children to alcoholism, which he believed had its inception in the fact that he was often an absentee father whose attention was diverted to national issues instead of his family. After retirement from the Senate McGovern went into the hotel business, but became very discouraged over the burden government regulations placed on small businessmen. I think his hotel failed, yet he met the reverse with the stoicism he showed throughout his life. 

We should take a lesson from McGovern, who was a true patriot and who never forgot he was an American, unlike so many of his party today. McGovern compares particularly favorably with the execrable Jimmy Carter, aka "The Bitterest President"™. McGovern suffered an excruciatingly painful defeat in 1972, yet he got over it and got on with it; unlike Carter, who has let his vitriol over his defeat color his entire life since he left office. For all Carter's good work with Habitat For Humanity, his open resentment over his defeat and his place in history have led him to make some unfortunate comments and to take regrettable positions. Consequently Carter looks all the smaller in retrospect because of his pettiness.

Yet McGovern, by taking the high road, is universally remembered as a man of principle. Because of his kindness, largeness of spirit and quiet strength, he has only grown in stature over the years. There's a lesson there. May he go in peace and love.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #691 on: October 18, 2012, 11:53:17 PM »
Warming up a seat in the waiting room - Castro Suffers Severe Stroke, Cannot Speak, Feed Self or Recognize People. http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/10/18/3056621/fidel-castro-suffered-a-stroke.html.

As these things go the Cuban dictator, although he probably holds the record for longest tenure of a Communist dictator at close to 50 years, is not even in the top ten of Communist executioners...which likely means he's responsible for the deaths, most often following torture, of more than 10,000 victims but less than 100,000. One of the chief reasons his passing would be notable is because of how many apologists he had in the West, particularly among the chattering and entertainment classes, as well as the ardor of that apology, particularly in light of the threadbare and transparent nature of such defense in areas such as healthcare, his legal system and social justice in Cuba.

Stand by for his passing in the next few days - I predict glowing tributes from NYT, MSNBC and CNN among others. 

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #692 on: October 19, 2012, 12:30:48 AM »
Stand by for his passing in the next few days - I predict glowing tributes from NYT, MSNBC and CNN among others.


and it makes me puke.


yesterday, i watched a biography on castro on netflix.  i forget the title.  the opening scene showed a room full of black people in harlem cheering castro as he proudly waved from the podium.  this was followed by two hours of praise by creatures ranging from this hollywood celebrity to that professor to this congressman to that author.  as i watched this 120 minute suck off, i kept silently repeating to myself, "uhhh... but he is personally responsible for countless deaths and the political imprisonment/oppression of millions of human beings.  what am i missing?" 


sorry if this offends anyone, but i think the baby boomer generation is just shit.  boomers: the same generation who proudly marched for civil/human rights just 40 short years ago... but who now long to fellate  a documented oppressor like castro.  my grandmother's generation would never have been capable of warm feelings toward this animal.

for as long as i've paid attention to politics, leftist democrats have enjoyed revising history in such a way as to claim JFK as some sort of martyr for their cause.  go back and listen to any random JFK speech and you'll clearly see how far the "liberal" wing of the democratic party has deviated from their roots.


leftists choose some amazing heroes. 


Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #693 on: October 19, 2012, 12:36:52 AM »

and it makes me puke.

I couldn't agree more with your entire post.  It's nice to be occasionally reassured that I'm not insane, that there are others out there like me who see through the bullshit, and that I'm not imagining how far left the American political landscape has swung. 

----------------
EDIT: sorry to get too political in the celebrity death thread.  carry on.


Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #694 on: October 19, 2012, 05:39:55 AM »
I somewhat disagree about boomers.  A large number of people - liberals - associated with boomers are not boomers at all.  The first boomers were born in 1946, but a generation of leftists preceded them - the so called Silent Generation.  That's the only generation to not have a president, so many people forget about it.  But most of the folks associated with hippies, the 60s, etc. are members of that generation.  I'm talking about people such as Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Jane Fonda, Bernadine Dohrn, Bill Ayers, Gloria Steinhem, John Kerry, etc.  Not a very silent bunch at all.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #695 on: October 19, 2012, 06:24:40 AM »
Kennedy was certainly considered liberal by those in office at the time.

Like other presidents however he had positions on both sides of the fence.

I am not a history buff so my pov on Kennedy and Vietnam may not be altogether accurate. Kennedy gave an ambassadorship to Henry Cabot Lodge. Lodge imo wanted a war in Vietnam and was backed by wall street. I don't think (naively so) Kennedy considered that.

Kennedy was socially liberal, fiscally... probably conservative. However, didn't he spend over 3 billion on housing for the poor?

Back to the point however, McGovern shouldn't be the exception to the rule.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #696 on: October 19, 2012, 01:54:13 PM »
Kennedy was certainly considered liberal by those in office at the time...

The terms mean different things over time - the issues of the day change.  It's really hard to compare accross time, it's like trying to compare baseball players of one generation to another.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #697 on: October 19, 2012, 03:21:43 PM »
Somewhere Sean Penn is crying.  :'(

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #698 on: October 19, 2012, 04:04:32 PM »
I am not a history buff so my pov on Kennedy and Vietnam may not be altogether accurate.

i'm surprised to see you say this about yourself.  you always seem very well read and knowledgeable to me, regardless of whether i always agree with you or not.


/ballmassage

Quote
Kennedy was socially liberal, fiscally... probably conservative. However, didn't he spend over 3 billion on housing for the poor?

my reason for mentioning jfk isn't due to his support of this social program or that (or any lack thereof).  i mention him due to the fact that his world view was entirely incongruent with that of fidel castro when it came to human/civil rights.  in nearly any random kennedy speech you find, jfk consistently talks about freedom for oppressed people around the world.  he was very inspiring in that regard.  human rights were center to his approach as president, and he emphasized it at every opportunity.  for castro, human rights have been an afterthought... a mere inconvenience along the path to maintaining power over his subjects. 

if i were transported back to 1961, i'm sure i, too, would happily classify myself as a liberal.  however, in my lifetime, "liberal" has come to mean leftist (and there are reasons for this), which is unfortunate.  i'm not saying it's unfortunate simply because a term was redefined.  that happens to language all the time.  it's unfortunate because it means an entire generation of civil/human rights activists have politically evolved into apologists who overlook oppressive behavior if the oppressor meets certain political and social criteria. 

Both sides of the aisle have given big fat hugs to tyrants.

think about who was shaking hands with Saddam. who is pictured holding hands with leaders that support beheadings?

yes, i know neo-conservatives have supported evil men, too, but in those instances, it seems it's usually neo-conservative leadership who overlook oppressive behavior... not the regular rank and file on the street.  in castro's case, the leftist man on the street is only too quick to praise... and i think that distinguishes the two. 

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #699 on: October 19, 2012, 04:08:57 PM »
by the way... when i see some hipster fuck-stick walking around with his "che" shirt, i want to remove his face with a cheese grater.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #700 on: October 19, 2012, 04:57:31 PM »
ahhhh, sweet refreshing clarity. 

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #701 on: October 19, 2012, 04:59:07 PM »
by the way... when i see some hipster fuck-stick walking around with his "che" shirt, i want to remove his face with a cheese grater.
I ask if he wears his hitler T-shirt on alternate days.  That always gets a rise out of him. Particularly when I point out that che's mentor, fidel, spent WWII as a law student in Havana, and a hitler supporter. fidel is an equal opportunity tyrant.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #702 on: October 19, 2012, 05:28:54 PM »
just a few examples for your consideration:



Fidel Castro questioning a Cuban farmer who was later executed.
The woman behind Castro is Celia Sánchez and sitting next to him is Camilo Cienfuegos.


Even before the triumph of the Revolution, Castro and his gang were prone to murder those who disagreed with them.  In this photo, taken while still in the Sierra Maestra mountains, Fidel Castro's brother, Raul, is seen getting ready to shoot a young rebel soldier who disobeyed orders.


The three photos above show two prisoners being shot by Castro's rebel forces in the Sierra Maestra mountains.
Castro's reign of brutality began over 50 years ago, and it still continues today.


Priests Juan Miguel Aldaz and Jose Luis Garrigoitia,  pray with prisoner Ramon Reytor, minutes before he was executed in the town of Manzanillo, Oriente province.


Fathers Aldaz and Garrigoitia with the prisoners moments before they were murdered.
Prisoners were taken to the town cemetery and they would have to wait in line and witness the other executions, before they themselves were shot.


Col. Cornelio Rojas, chief of police of Santa Clara, is shown here in a jail cell before
Che Guevara ordered him to be shot to death without a trial.


The photos above show the brutal murder of Col. Rojas, who was shot to death on orders of Guevara, without the benefit of a trial.
 
A letter from Barbara Rangel, granddaughter of Col. Rojas:
My name is Barbara Rangel, granddaughter of Colonel Cornelio Rojas, Chief of Police in Santa Clara in the 1950's. He was a national policeman before Batista came to power.
He earned his military status of Colonel and was involved in revolutionary activities in the 1930's.
He was a man who always fought for the freedom of Cuba, in the 1930's he was fighting against dictator Gerardo Machado at Gibara.
His father and grandfather: Colonel Cornelio Rojas Escobar and Brig. General Cornelio Rojas Hurtado, had fought prominently in Cuba's War of Independence from Spain.
I would like to clarify and educate, if I may, those who are ignorant of the truth.
My grandfather was arrested and murdered by the godfather of modern terrorism, Che Guevara, and another murderer, Fidel Castro, for the only purpose of creating terror among the population.

the above was taken from this website.

Sylvia Kristol, Dead at 60
« Reply #703 on: October 19, 2012, 09:40:37 PM »
I suppose there's a certain natural universal justice in de-hijacking one's own quasi-hijack, or at least one's own premature posting, on the as-yet-technically-"living" Castro. But I feel this is important enough that it takes precedence: Sylvia Kristol is dead at the age of 60, of cancer-related symptoms. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/19/arts/sylvia-kristel-60-dies-starred-in-emmanuelle.html?_r=0

For men of a certain age the death of "Emmanuelle" is a much bigger story - and certainly more painful story by far - than the Castro death-watch. She'll certainly be missed more. For those men who are around 40-45 and older, merely whispering the name "Emmanuelle" can unlock a treasure trove of delightful audio-visual recollections.

Ms. Kristol initiated the "Emmanuelle" movie series in 1974 at the age of 21, and finished the 12th movie of that name at the age of 41 in 1993. It's hard to overestimate the significance of that series and Ms. Kristol's place in young men's sexual fantasies of the day. Today some might tell you that the time was the "Golden Age of Porn"; but it was also the birth of the soft-core genre. It was the time when the R-rated movie was invented. For men (and women) under 21 at the time, soft-core R-rated fare was the only game in town. Plus, movies like Emmanuelle didn't carry the sticky-floor stigma of hard-core movies of the so-called Golden Age such as Deep Throat and Behind The Green Door. Besides, not all guys (or their girlfriends) were fans of John Holmes; although they did find Ms. Kristol fresh and acceptable. And when HBO got more national exposure in the early 80's, Ms. Kristol and her Emmanuelle series was a staple of the late-weekend lineup.

It's safe to say that Sylvia Kristol/"Emmanuelle" was one of the most well-known figures in the popular culture of the 80's.

*edit* I do feel somewhat embarrassed tagging this on to the end of MV's important post. I realize I'm the one to blame for this rabbit trail that led to this, but might I suggest a transplant to another thread?

Re: Sylvia Kristol, Dead at 60
« Reply #704 on: October 19, 2012, 09:58:20 PM »
I suppose there's a certain natural universal justice in de-hijacking one's own quasi-hijack, or at least one's own premature posting, on the as-yet-technically-"living" Castro. But I feel this is important enough that it takes precedence: Sylvia Kristol is dead at the age of 60, of cancer-related symptoms. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/19/arts/sylvia-kristel-60-dies-starred-in-emmanuelle.html?_r=0

For men of a certain age the death of "Emmanuelle" is a much bigger story - and certainly more painful story by far - than the Castro death-watch. She'll certainly be missed more. For those men who are around 40-45 and older, merely whispering the name "Emmanuelle" can unlock a treasure trove of delightful audio-visual recollections.

Ms. Kristol initiated the "Emmanuelle" movie series in 1974 at the age of 21, and finished the 12th movie of that name at the age of 41 in 1993. It's hard to overestimate the significance of that series and Ms. Kristol's place in young men's sexual fantasies of the day. Today some might tell you that the time was the "Golden Age of Porn"; but it was also the birth of the soft-core genre. It was the time when the R-rated movie was invented. For men (and women) under 21 at the time, soft-core R-rated fare was the only game in town. Plus, movies like Emmanuelle didn't carry the sticky-floor stigma of hard-core movies of the so-called Golden Age such as Deep Throat and Behind The Green Door. Besides, not all guys (or their girlfriends) were fans of John Holmes; although they did find Ms. Kristol fresh and acceptable. And when HBO got more national exposure in the early 80's, Ms. Kristol and her Emmanuelle series was a staple of the late-weekend lineup.

It's safe to say that Sylvia Kristol/"Emmanuelle" was one of the most well-known figures in the popular culture of the 80's.

          Castro has been near death for years. He'll be in the same state in 2015. The bearded Cuban version of Sunny von Bulow at this point.

         However, Ms. Kristel's passing represents a mortality check for this 37 year old curmudgeon.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #705 on: October 19, 2012, 10:34:44 PM »
(I lifted this, with edits, from "Politics", and I realize that quoting oneself is probably not a good sign).

I have come to admire Senator McGovern over the years, not just for his service as a B-24 pilot in WWII, but for his stoicism in the face of defeat and personal tragedy and misfortune as well. As I recall he flew out of Italy, and there were probably more than a few things he recognized in Joseph Heller's Catch-22. It's almost certain that much of his views about Vietnam came form his personal experience with war, and his revulsion at the huge cost in lost or shattered lives for what he believed were foreign policy goals not necessary to America's vital interests.

The personal cost of his public life was very high, and IIRC he lost two adult children to alcoholism, which he believed had its inception in the fact that he was often an absentee father whose attention was diverted to national issues instead of his family. After retirement from the Senate McGovern went into the hotel business, but became very discouraged over the burden government regulations placed on small businessmen. I think his hotel failed, yet he met the reverse with the stoicism he showed throughout his life. 

We should take a lesson from McGovern, who was a true patriot and who never forgot he was an American, unlike so many of his party today. McGovern compares particularly favorably with the execrable Jimmy Carter, aka "The Bitterest President"™. McGovern suffered an excruciatingly painful defeat in 1972, yet he got over it and got on with it; unlike Carter, who has let his vitriol over his defeat color his entire life since he left office. For all Carter's good work with Habitat For Humanity, his open resentment over his defeat and his place in history have led him to make some unfortunate comments and to take regrettable positions. Consequently Carter looks all the smaller in retrospect because of his pettiness.

Yet McGovern, by taking the high road, is universally remembered as a man of principle. Because of his kindness, largeness of spirit and quiet strength, he has only grown in stature over the years. There's a lesson there. May he go in peace and love.

I was going to comment on this and your eulogy for Sylvia Kristol, but I'll just say 'perfect' and leave it at that.
 

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #706 on: October 22, 2012, 11:41:12 AM »
Russell Means - American Indian Movement - dead at 72.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #707 on: October 22, 2012, 11:43:23 AM »
Russell Means - American Indian Movement - dead at 72.
  How?  :D

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #708 on: October 22, 2012, 03:20:25 PM »


R.I.P. Russell Means
Activist and actor Russell Means died of cancer Monday at his home in Porcupine, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. He was 72. A prominent member of the American Indian movement, he was instrumental in Marlon Brando having a Native American accept Brando’s Best Actor Oscar at the 1973 Academy Awards as a way of highlighting the plight of American Indians. Means also appeared in several films: He debuted as an actor in Michael Mann’s 1992 film The Last Of The Mohicans with Daniel Day-Lewis, and his big-screen credits include Oliver Stone’s Natural Born Killers and the voice of the Powhatan in Disney’s 1995 animated Pocahontas as well as the 1998 sequel. Means also appeared on TV in show such as HBO’s Curb Your Enthusiasm and CBS’ Nash Bridges.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #709 on: November 17, 2012, 04:44:22 AM »
Don't know if he counts as a 'celebrity' anywhere else, but those of us who grew up around the Detroit area remember TV weatherman Sonny Eliot, who died yesterday at 91.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #710 on: November 18, 2012, 06:08:40 PM »
Another artifact of my childhood. God bless you Sony


Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #712 on: November 23, 2012, 11:52:33 PM »
Larry Hagman has died.    :(

http://www.dallasnews.com/news/local-news/20121123-actor-larry-hagman-notorious-as-dallas-villain-j.r.-ewing-dies.ece
   There's a guy who lived at least 10-15 years longer than I thought he would. I know he had liver trouble about 20 years ago...and I'm pretty sure he was a pal of Dennis Hopper, David Crosby and other fast living types who are either dead or well over 70.

          They go in threes...so I'm predicting the other two will be from CBS Friday night lineup of 1980. So Tom Wopat and and Lou Ferrigno are now in my death pool.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #713 on: November 24, 2012, 10:58:35 PM »
Apparently, throat cancer got him in the end.  I believe one of the stars of Falcon Crest died this year (Ken Kerchival?), so that would place it in my early 1980s Friday night triumvirate of Dukes of Hazzard, Dallas, and Falcon Crest.

   There's a guy who lived at least 10-15 years longer than I thought he would. I know he had liver trouble about 20 years ago...and I'm pretty sure he was a pal of Dennis Hopper, David Crosby and other fast living types who are either dead or well over 70.

          They go in threes...so I'm predicting the other two will be from CBS Friday night lineup of 1980. So Tom Wopat and and Lou Ferrigno are now in my death pool.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #714 on: November 25, 2012, 01:13:49 AM »
Larry Hagman has died.    :(
yes famous as astronaut Major Tony Nelson who found a 2000 year old female genie on a desert island.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #715 on: November 30, 2012, 06:06:21 PM »
Art Ginsburg, Mr. Food, dead at 81.
Died Wednesday - just after the sNoory pizza roll affair.  There are no coincidences.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #716 on: December 05, 2012, 12:02:31 PM »

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #717 on: December 11, 2012, 01:42:12 PM »
 
         Ed Cassidy, the drummer from Spirit, is no longer part of the "living persons" portal of Wikipedia. Dead on 12/6 at 89.

       I knew something was up when a local classic rock station played "Nature's Way", "Fresh Garbage" and "Mr Skin" in a row. And considering that Randy California and John Locke are already dead, I figured it had to be Cass.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #718 on: December 11, 2012, 02:24:14 PM »

         Ed Cassidy, the drummer from Spirit, is no longer part of the "living persons" portal of Wikipedia. Dead on 12/6 at 89.

       I knew something was up when a local classic rock station played "Nature's Way", "Fresh Garbage" and "Mr Skin" in a row. And considering that Randy California and John Locke are already dead, I figured it had to be Cass.

Well I'll be. I thought the old man was well nigh indestructible. His shaved head creeped me out back in the days when only Anton LaVey did that. But hearing "Mr. Skin" takes me right back to the days I listened to it on the "underground station", over 40 years ago.

Re: Celebrity Deaths
« Reply #719 on: December 11, 2012, 03:54:50 PM »
Well I'll be. I thought the old man was well nigh indestructible. His shaved head creeped me out back in the days when only Anton LaVey did that. But hearing "Mr. Skin" takes me right back to the days I listened to it on the "underground station", over 40 years ago.
        Cass was certainly a rather unique figure in the canon of underground 60's rock, considering he was a contemporary of the parents of most artists in the scene. He also was part of Rising Sons, that mid 60's act with a young Taj Mahal, and even younger Ry Cooder.