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One Hundred Years Ago

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Rix Gins:
Thought it would be fun to start a thread covering what was going on 100 years ago.  Fellow BellGab history buffs, feel free to add to this thread, anything that applies to 1916.  In this case, I found out that something happened exactly 100 years ago today.

On this day back in 1916, the first Rose Bowl was played in Pasadena, Ca. between Washington State and Brown University.  (Wikipedia says that it was the second Rose Bowl but other websites state that it was the first due to the fact that succeeding Rose Bowl games were played for each year since 1916. Wikipedia seems to think that the first Rose Bowl was played in 1902.)  In any event, Washington State won the game by a score of 14 to 0.

Here is an interesting silent film of some players seeing the sights, plus close ups of players and coaches and also some game footage.

trostol:
January 1 The British Royal Army Medical Corps carries out the first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled.

Rix Gins:
Also on January 1, the Canadian government announced an increase of overseas troops from 250,000 to 500,000.  (WWI)

pyewacket:
Great idea, Rix Gins! Let's take a look at Hollywood, 1916.


--- Quote from: robinsonlibrary.com ---Douglas Fairbanks, "Everybody's hero" met "America's sweetheart" Mary Pickford in 1916, while the two were touring the country on a World War One Liberty Bond tour. The two began seeing each other romantically almost immediately, even though both were married (she to Owen Moore). Had the two not been so popular with the American public the adulterous relationship would have been considered scandalous and their respective studios would likely have nixed the romance immediately, but their popularity overshone the scandal and the general public thought it was a natural romance.

--- End quote ---

Jackstar:
Britannic left Naples and arrived in the Kea Channel on November 21, 1916. The crew had settled down to routine duties aboard ship. The nurses were preparing the hospital wards before they were to take on the next group of wounded soldiers for the return home. They had opened the portholes to air the rooms out. Engineers, down below, were preparing to change shifts. To make the job go smoother they decided to leave the water-tight doors open. It was about 8:00am when the crew was sitting down for breakfast when something went terribly wrong.

The Britannic was rocked by a major explosion to the port side of the ship. The ship had either come into contact with an underwater mine or was torpeoded by a German U-Boat. Water began to rush into the bow causing the ship to go down by the head. The captain gave to order to abandon the ship. Due to the fact that a majority of the portholes were opened as well as the watertight doors not being closed due to the shift change allowed the water to flood the ship at an acclerated rate. This meant that all of the safety measures added to the Britannic, as a result of the Titanic, were of no use.

The Britannic began to go under at an alarming rate. She also began to list heavily to the starboard side. Meanwhile, as the crew were getting into the lifeboats, the Captian tried one, last, desperate act. He thought if he restarted the Britannic's engines that it might be possible to beach her on Kea Island. What Bartlett did not know was that the propellers were already breaking the surface of the water when they began to turn. This meant disaster for the first lifeboats lowered toward the stern of the ship. The propellers began to create a suction pulling the lifeboats into them. The first couple boats stood no chance. They were drawn in and shredded along with the crew members in them. Upon realizing this, Captain Bartlett shut the engines off for the last time. The starting of the engines would not have helped anyway because the front of the Britannic had already touched down into the mud below.

James Cameron plans to use enhanced CGI to represent the propellers.

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