Author Topic: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade  (Read 2454072 times)

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Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52230 on: June 09, 2016, 12:46:28 AM »
I don't think so. This thread is pretty funny though, at the moment.


Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52231 on: June 09, 2016, 12:48:13 AM »
It's not misquoted. I was quoting you.  ;)

I beg to differ. There was no coma after my 'be'

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52232 on: June 09, 2016, 12:48:36 AM »
Equus (a movie about a young man who makes self love around horses)

Isn't that a major-league spoiler? 

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52233 on: June 09, 2016, 12:50:04 AM »
I beg to differ. There was no coma after my 'be'

but there should be before addressing someone; e.g, Listen here, mister!  ;)

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52234 on: June 09, 2016, 12:52:08 AM »
I hope this thread enforces use of the Oxford comma.  Example:  Basiago time-travels, teleports, and campaigns for president.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52235 on: June 09, 2016, 12:52:34 AM »
Isn't that a major-league spoiler?

It's a fair warning for this lot.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52236 on: June 09, 2016, 12:54:07 AM »
and then happened upon Clyde Lewis also making the "connections" some weeks later when I was taking a piss and turned on my bathroom radio. :o

Can I just say how impressed I am by a micturition session long enough to make turning on a radio worthwhile?

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52237 on: June 09, 2016, 12:54:47 AM »
Ha. I still can't find a reference where commas shouldn't be used in that case. Though, ( ;) ) I welcome it.

I speculate you should study the following which i have pulled up for you.

__________

Rule 1. Use commas to separate words and word groups in a simple series of three or more items.

Example: My estate goes to my husband, son, daughter-in-law, and nephew.

Note: When the last comma in a series comes before and or or (after daughter-in-law in the above example), it is known as the Oxford comma. Most newspapers and magazines drop the Oxford comma in a simple series, apparently feeling it's unnecessary. However, omission of the Oxford comma can sometimes lead to misunderstandings.

Example: We had coffee, cheese and crackers and grapes.

Adding a comma after crackers makes it clear that cheese and crackers represents one dish. In cases like this, clarity demands the Oxford comma.

We had coffee, cheese and crackers, and grapes.

Fiction and nonfiction books generally prefer the Oxford comma. Writers must decide Oxford or no Oxford and not switch back and forth, except when omitting the Oxford comma could cause confusion as in the cheese and crackers example.

Rule 2. Use a comma to separate two adjectives when the order of the adjectives is interchangeable.

Example: He is a strong, healthy man.
We could also say healthy, strong man.

Example: We stayed at an expensive summer resort.
We would not say summer expensive resort, so no comma.

Another way to determine if a comma is needed is to mentally put and between the two adjectives. If the result still makes sense, add the comma. In the examples above, a strong and healthy man makes sense, but an expensive and summer resort does not.

Rule 3a. Many inexperienced writers run two independent clauses together by using a comma instead of a period. This results in the dreaded run-on sentence or, more technically, a comma splice.

Incorrect: He walked all the way home, he shut the door.

There are several simple remedies:

Correct: He walked all the way home. He shut the door.
Correct: After he walked all the way home, he shut the door.
Correct: He walked all the way home, and he shut the door.

Rule 3b. In sentences where two independent clauses are joined by connectors such as and, or, but, etc., put a comma at the end of the first clause.

Incorrect: He walked all the way home and he shut the door.
Correct: He walked all the way home, and he shut the door.

Some writers omit the comma if the clauses are both quite short:

Example: I paint and he writes.

Rule 3c. If the subject does not appear in front of the second verb, a comma is generally unnecessary.

Example: He thought quickly but still did not answer correctly.

But sometimes a comma in this situation is necessary to avoid confusion.

Confusing: I saw that she was busy and prepared to leave.
Clearer with comma: I saw that she was busy, and prepared to leave.

Without a comma, the reader is liable to think that "she" was the one who was prepared to leave.

Rule 4a. When starting a sentence with a dependent clause, use a comma after it.

Example: If you are not sure about this, let me know now.

Follow the same policy with introductory phrases.

Example: Having finally arrived in town, we went shopping.

However, if the introductory phrase is clear and brief (three or four words), the comma is optional.

Example: When in town we go shopping.

But always add a comma if it would avoid confusion.

Example: Last Sunday, evening classes were canceled. (The comma prevents a misreading.)

When an introductory phrase begins with a preposition, a comma may not be necessary even if the phrase contains more than three or four words.

Example: Into the sparkling crystal ball he gazed.

If such a phrase contains more than one preposition, a comma may be used unless a verb immediately follows the phrase.

Examples:
Between your house on Main Street and my house on Grand Avenue, the mayor's mansion stands proudly.
Between your house on Main Street and my house on Grand Avenue is the mayor's mansion.

Rule 4b. A comma is usually unnecessary when the sentence starts with an independent clause followed by a dependent clause.

Example: Let me know now if you are not sure about this.

Rule 5. Use commas to set off nonessential words, clauses, and phrases (see Who, That, Which, Rule 2b).

Incorrect: Jill who is my sister shut the door.
Correct: Jill, who is my sister, shut the door.

Incorrect: The man knowing it was late hurried home.
Correct: The man, knowing it was late, hurried home.

In the preceding examples, note the comma after sister and late. Nonessential words, clauses, and phrases that occur midsentence must be enclosed by commas. The closing comma is called an appositive comma. Many writers forget to add this important comma. Following are two instances of the need for an appositive comma with one or more nouns.

Incorrect: My best friend, Joe arrived.
Correct: My best friend, Joe, arrived.

Incorrect: The three items, a book, a pen, and paper were on the table.
Correct: The three items, a book, a pen, and paper, were on the table.

Rule 6. If something or someone is sufficiently identified, the description that follows is considered nonessential and should be surrounded by commas.

Examples:
Freddy, who has a limp, was in an auto accident.
If we already know which Freddy is meant, the description is not essential.

The boy who has a limp was in an auto accident.
We do not know which boy is meant without further description; therefore, no commas are used.

This leads to a persistent problem. Look at the following sentence:

Example: My brother Bill is here.

Now, see how adding two commas changes that sentence's meaning:

Example: My brother, Bill, is here.

Careful writers and readers understand that the first sentence means I have more than one brother. The commas in the second sentence mean that Bill is my only brother.

Why? In the first sentence, Bill is essential information: it identifies which of my two (or more) brothers I'm speaking of. This is why no commas enclose Bill.

In the second sentence, Bill is nonessential information—whom else but Bill could I mean?—hence the commas.

Comma misuse is nothing to take lightly. It can lead to a train wreck like this:

Example: Mark Twain's book, Tom Sawyer, is a delight.

Because of the commas, that sentence states that Twain wrote only one book. In fact, he wrote more than two dozen of them.

Rule 7a. Use a comma after certain words that introduce a sentence, such as well, yes, why, hello, hey, etc.

Examples:
Why, I can't believe this!
No, you can't have a dollar.

Rule 7b. Use commas to set off expressions that interrupt the sentence flow (nevertheless, after all, by the way, on the other hand, however, etc.).

Example: I am, by the way, very nervous about this.

Rule 8. Use commas to set off the name, nickname, term of endearment, or title of a person directly addressed.

Examples:
Will you, Aisha, do that assignment for me?
Yes, old friend, I will.
Good day, Captain.

Rule 9. Use a comma to separate the day of the month from the year, and—what most people forget!—always put one after the year, also.

Example: It was in the Sun's June 5, 2003, edition.

No comma is necessary for just the month and year.

Example: It was in a June 2003 article.

Rule 10. Use a comma to separate a city from its state, and remember to put one after the state, also.

Example: I'm from the Akron, Ohio, area.

Rule 11. Traditionally, if a person's name is followed by Sr. or Jr., a comma follows the last name: Martin Luther King, Jr. This comma is no longer considered mandatory. However, if a comma does precede Sr. or Jr., another comma must follow the entire name when it appears midsentence.

Correct: Al Mooney Sr. is here.
Correct: Al Mooney, Sr., is here.
Incorrect: Al Mooney, Sr. is here.

Rule 12. Similarly, use commas to enclose degrees or titles used with names.

Example: Al Mooney, M.D., is here.

Rule 13a. Use commas to introduce or interrupt direct quotations.

Examples:
He said, "I don't care."
"Why," I asked, "don't you care?"

This rule is optional with one-word quotations.

Example: He said "Stop."

Rule 13b. If the quotation comes before he said, she wrote, they reported, Dana insisted, or a similar attribution, end the quoted material with a comma, even if it is only one word.

Examples:
"I don't care," he said.
"Stop," he said.

Rule 13c. If a quotation functions as a subject or object in a sentence, it might not need a comma.

Examples:
Is "I don't care" all you can say to me?
Saying "Stop the car" was a mistake.

Rule 13d. If a quoted question ends in midsentence, the question mark replaces a comma.

Example: "Will you still be my friend?" she asked.

Rule 14. Use a comma to separate a statement from a question.

Example: I can go, can't I?

Rule 15. Use a comma to separate contrasting parts of a sentence.

Example: That is my money, not yours.

Rule 16a. Use a comma before and after certain introductory words or terms, such as namely, that is, i.e., e.g., and for instance, when they are followed by a series of items.

Example: You may be required to bring many items, e.g., sleeping bags, pans, and warm clothing.

Rule 16b. A comma should precede the term etc. Many authorities also recommend a comma after etc. when it is placed midsentence.

Example: Sleeping bags, pans, warm clothing, etc., are in the tent.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52238 on: June 09, 2016, 12:56:18 AM »
I hope this thread enforces use of the Oxford comma.  Example:  Basiago time-travels, teleports, and campaigns for president.
Agreed. That is the proper way.
ps: I had a stand-off, of sorts, with a squirrel at my "bird" (really squirrel and coon) feeder. Not to be crude but he had a, not literal but real, set of balls. It was hilarious. Hanging low and big. I guess breeding time.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52239 on: June 09, 2016, 12:57:37 AM »
but there should be before addressing someone; e.g, Listen here, mister!  ;)

I speculate you may be wrong.

Not being a grammar expert I will currently label your comment as being potentially valid until confirmed otherwise.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52240 on: June 09, 2016, 01:00:15 AM »
Agreed. That is the proper way.
ps: I had a stand-off, of sorts, with a squirrel at my "bird" (really squirrel and coon) feeder. Not to be crude but he had a, not literal but real, set of balls. It was hilarious. Hanging low and big. I guess breeding time.

Clarity demands the use of the Oxford comma. You have failed again.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52241 on: June 09, 2016, 01:00:45 AM »
I speculate you may be wrong.

Not being a grammar expert I will currently label your comment as being potentially valid until confirmed otherwise.

Oh, it's valid:

http://www.grammarerrors.com/punctuation/commas-in-direct-address/

;)

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52242 on: June 09, 2016, 01:01:07 AM »

I never want to see a comma again.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52243 on: June 09, 2016, 01:01:49 AM »
I speculate you should study the following which i have pulled up for you.

__________

Examples:

Thanks, ( ;) ) I saw that in my first internet search. Please diagram my sentence and point out where I was wrong, (  ;)) presumably. Seriously, ( ;)) do they teach that anymore?
ps: I agree with our Future Pres that the Portugal style is the way to go. Not on their economy (shambles) but their approach to drugs.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52244 on: June 09, 2016, 01:04:25 AM »
I hope this thread enforces use of the Oxford comma.  Example:  Basiago time-travels, teleports, and campaigns for president.

zeebo dashing, classic, and prefers unnecessary commas

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52245 on: June 09, 2016, 01:05:36 AM »
Oh, it's valid:

http://www.grammarerrors.com/punctuation/commas-in-direct-address/

;)

I am going to upgrade your comment from being potentially valid to being probably valid. I can't ascertain the validity of your statement from one source alone. To do so would be less than healthy.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52246 on: June 09, 2016, 01:05:49 AM »
I hope this thread enforces use of the Oxford comma.  Example:  Basiago time-travels, teleports, and campaigns for president.

It will not if people attended The Other School.  :(

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52247 on: June 09, 2016, 01:06:06 AM »
I speculate you should study the following which i have pulled up for you.

__________

Rule 1. Use commas to separate words and word groups in a simple series of three or more items.

Example: My estate goes to my husband, son, daughter-in-law, and nephew.

Note: When the last comma in a series comes before and or or (after daughter-in-law in the above example), it is known as the Oxford comma. Most newspapers and magazines drop the Oxford comma in a simple series, apparently feeling it's unnecessary. However, omission of the Oxford comma can sometimes lead to misunderstandings.

Example: We had coffee, cheese and crackers and grapes.

Adding a comma after crackers makes it clear that cheese and crackers represents one dish. In cases like this, clarity demands the Oxford comma.

We had coffee, cheese and crackers, and grapes.

Fiction and nonfiction books generally prefer the Oxford comma. Writers must decide Oxford or no Oxford and not switch back and forth, except when omitting the Oxford comma could cause confusion as in the cheese and crackers example.

Rule 2. Use a comma to separate two adjectives when the order of the adjectives is interchangeable.

Example: He is a strong, healthy man.
We could also say healthy, strong man.

Example: We stayed at an expensive summer resort.
We would not say summer expensive resort, so no comma.

Another way to determine if a comma is needed is to mentally put and between the two adjectives. If the result still makes sense, add the comma. In the examples above, a strong and healthy man makes sense, but an expensive and summer resort does not.

Rule 3a. Many inexperienced writers run two independent clauses together by using a comma instead of a period. This results in the dreaded run-on sentence or, more technically, a comma splice.

Incorrect: He walked all the way home, he shut the door.

There are several simple remedies:

Correct: He walked all the way home. He shut the door.
Correct: After he walked all the way home, he shut the door.
Correct: He walked all the way home, and he shut the door.

Rule 3b. In sentences where two independent clauses are joined by connectors such as and, or, but, etc., put a comma at the end of the first clause.

Incorrect: He walked all the way home and he shut the door.
Correct: He walked all the way home, and he shut the door.

Some writers omit the comma if the clauses are both quite short:

Example: I paint and he writes.

Rule 3c. If the subject does not appear in front of the second verb, a comma is generally unnecessary.

Example: He thought quickly but still did not answer correctly.

But sometimes a comma in this situation is necessary to avoid confusion.

Confusing: I saw that she was busy and prepared to leave.
Clearer with comma: I saw that she was busy, and prepared to leave.

Without a comma, the reader is liable to think that "she" was the one who was prepared to leave.

Rule 4a. When starting a sentence with a dependent clause, use a comma after it.

Example: If you are not sure about this, let me know now.

Follow the same policy with introductory phrases.

Example: Having finally arrived in town, we went shopping.

However, if the introductory phrase is clear and brief (three or four words), the comma is optional.

Example: When in town we go shopping.

But always add a comma if it would avoid confusion.

Example: Last Sunday, evening classes were canceled. (The comma prevents a misreading.)

When an introductory phrase begins with a preposition, a comma may not be necessary even if the phrase contains more than three or four words.

Example: Into the sparkling crystal ball he gazed.

If such a phrase contains more than one preposition, a comma may be used unless a verb immediately follows the phrase.

Examples:
Between your house on Main Street and my house on Grand Avenue, the mayor's mansion stands proudly.
Between your house on Main Street and my house on Grand Avenue is the mayor's mansion.

Rule 4b. A comma is usually unnecessary when the sentence starts with an independent clause followed by a dependent clause.

Example: Let me know now if you are not sure about this.

Rule 5. Use commas to set off nonessential words, clauses, and phrases (see Who, That, Which, Rule 2b).

Incorrect: Jill who is my sister shut the door.
Correct: Jill, who is my sister, shut the door.

Incorrect: The man knowing it was late hurried home.
Correct: The man, knowing it was late, hurried home.

In the preceding examples, note the comma after sister and late. Nonessential words, clauses, and phrases that occur midsentence must be enclosed by commas. The closing comma is called an appositive comma. Many writers forget to add this important comma. Following are two instances of the need for an appositive comma with one or more nouns.

Incorrect: My best friend, Joe arrived.
Correct: My best friend, Joe, arrived.

Incorrect: The three items, a book, a pen, and paper were on the table.
Correct: The three items, a book, a pen, and paper, were on the table.

Rule 6. If something or someone is sufficiently identified, the description that follows is considered nonessential and should be surrounded by commas.

Examples:
Freddy, who has a limp, was in an auto accident.
If we already know which Freddy is meant, the description is not essential.

The boy who has a limp was in an auto accident.
We do not know which boy is meant without further description; therefore, no commas are used.

This leads to a persistent problem. Look at the following sentence:

Example: My brother Bill is here.

Now, see how adding two commas changes that sentence's meaning:

Example: My brother, Bill, is here.

Careful writers and readers understand that the first sentence means I have more than one brother. The commas in the second sentence mean that Bill is my only brother.

Why? In the first sentence, Bill is essential information: it identifies which of my two (or more) brothers I'm speaking of. This is why no commas enclose Bill.

In the second sentence, Bill is nonessential information—whom else but Bill could I mean?—hence the commas.

Comma misuse is nothing to take lightly. It can lead to a train wreck like this:

Example: Mark Twain's book, Tom Sawyer, is a delight.

Because of the commas, that sentence states that Twain wrote only one book. In fact, he wrote more than two dozen of them.

Rule 7a. Use a comma after certain words that introduce a sentence, such as well, yes, why, hello, hey, etc.

Examples:
Why, I can't believe this!
No, you can't have a dollar.

Rule 7b. Use commas to set off expressions that interrupt the sentence flow (nevertheless, after all, by the way, on the other hand, however, etc.).

Example: I am, by the way, very nervous about this.

Rule 8. Use commas to set off the name, nickname, term of endearment, or title of a person directly addressed.

Examples:
Will you, Aisha, do that assignment for me?
Yes, old friend, I will.
Good day, Captain.

Rule 9. Use a comma to separate the day of the month from the year, and—what most people forget!—always put one after the year, also.

Example: It was in the Sun's June 5, 2003, edition.

No comma is necessary for just the month and year.

Example: It was in a June 2003 article.

Rule 10. Use a comma to separate a city from its state, and remember to put one after the state, also.

Example: I'm from the Akron, Ohio, area.

Rule 11. Traditionally, if a person's name is followed by Sr. or Jr., a comma follows the last name: Martin Luther King, Jr. This comma is no longer considered mandatory. However, if a comma does precede Sr. or Jr., another comma must follow the entire name when it appears midsentence.

Correct: Al Mooney Sr. is here.
Correct: Al Mooney, Sr., is here.
Incorrect: Al Mooney, Sr. is here.

Rule 12. Similarly, use commas to enclose degrees or titles used with names.

Example: Al Mooney, M.D., is here.

Rule 13a. Use commas to introduce or interrupt direct quotations.

Examples:
He said, "I don't care."
"Why," I asked, "don't you care?"

This rule is optional with one-word quotations.

Example: He said "Stop."

Rule 13b. If the quotation comes before he said, she wrote, they reported, Dana insisted, or a similar attribution, end the quoted material with a comma, even if it is only one word.

Examples:
"I don't care," he said.
"Stop," he said.

Rule 13c. If a quotation functions as a subject or object in a sentence, it might not need a comma.

Examples:
Is "I don't care" all you can say to me?
Saying "Stop the car" was a mistake.

Rule 13d. If a quoted question ends in midsentence, the question mark replaces a comma.

Example: "Will you still be my friend?" she asked.

Rule 14. Use a comma to separate a statement from a question.

Example: I can go, can't I?

Rule 15. Use a comma to separate contrasting parts of a sentence.

Example: That is my money, not yours.

Rule 16a. Use a comma before and after certain introductory words or terms, such as namely, that is, i.e., e.g., and for instance, when they are followed by a series of items.

Example: You may be required to bring many items, e.g., sleeping bags, pans, and warm clothing.

Rule 16b. A comma should precede the term etc. Many authorities also recommend a comma after etc. when it is placed midsentence.

Example: Sleeping bags, pans, warm clothing, etc., are in the tent.

I_disagree

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52248 on: June 09, 2016, 01:06:55 AM »
zeebo: dashing, classic, and prefers unnecessary commas.

FIFY. Since you're describing zeebo I thought you could use a colon. Not that the one you have isn't nice too.  ;)

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52249 on: June 09, 2016, 01:08:56 AM »
Clarity demands the use of the Oxford comma. You have failed again.
damnit I just went through treatment to get off phonics

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52250 on: June 09, 2016, 01:09:56 AM »
I often wondered if there is potential in probability or probability in potential.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52251 on: June 09, 2016, 01:10:06 AM »
damnit I just went through treatment to get off phonics

A lot of kids got hooked on it back in the day.  :(

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52252 on: June 09, 2016, 01:11:26 AM »
I_disagree
I want to initiate, in the keeping of cultural acceptance, the use of the upside down exclamation point into the English language. It looks so funny and, if Mexican tv has any truth to it, guys, especially fat ones, can have all kinds of oddly non-Mexican looking gals dancing and prancing about them, often dressed as school girls and nurses, in weird game show and skit situations. I will even dress as a bee. Why don't we import this and not the cartels or diseased types?

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52253 on: June 09, 2016, 01:13:22 AM »
ps: I agree with our Future Pres that the Portugal style is the way to go. Not on their economy (shambles) but their approach to drugs.

I remain surprised that some enterprising country has not hired Keith Richards to simply ingest all the drugs, thereby drying up the supply.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52254 on: June 09, 2016, 01:15:31 AM »
damnit I just went through treatment to get off phonics

Booked on phonics.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52255 on: June 09, 2016, 01:16:33 AM »

" The silly notion Obama 'jumped' with us in the time travel project "

No sir what is silly is the fact you maintain you are/were a time jumper and provide a nonsensical picture in attempts to prove this.

I remember him saying the enlarged zoomed in part of the picture shows his skeleton as he is materializing. AYFKM?

He says he doesn't smoke marijuana ; maybe he should start.

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52256 on: June 09, 2016, 01:17:58 AM »
zeebo dashing, classic, and prefers unnecessary commas

I don't always uses commas, but when I do, I like to throw in a few, extra.  ;)

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52257 on: June 09, 2016, 01:18:51 AM »
Bill Moyers (cover-up and LBJ guy.) I can see it. Andy now wants to only be interviewed by C2C, MITD, Jimmy Church, etc. Ha. I wonder how Heather treats the association with Norry, Church, etc?

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52258 on: June 09, 2016, 01:19:21 AM »
FIFY. Since you're describing zeebo I thought you could use a colon. Not that the one you have isn't nice too.  ;)

MD: Thank you, your colon is nice, too

Re: Midnight In The Desert With Heather Wade
« Reply #52259 on: June 09, 2016, 01:19:42 AM »
I was more or less with this guest until they suggested that the Nazis put Flouride into the drinking water of the concentration camps to keep the inmates docile.

(I am fairly sure the all watchtowers and armed guards made "mind-control" Flouride superfluous.)  ::)