Author Topic: One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 301877 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6390 on: April 09, 2018, 04:21:32 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Seattle Star, April 9, 1918.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6391 on: April 10, 2018, 03:45:07 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, April 10, 1918.


Quote
Battle of the Lys: A party of the 55th Division going into action near Bethune.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205077398 © IWM (Q 341)


Quote
Battle of Estaires. A line of British troops blinded by tear gas at an Advanced Dressing Station near Bethune, 10 April 1918. Each man has his hand on the shoulder of the man in front of him.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205193875 © IWM (Q 11586)


Quote
German prisoners, captured near La Bassee, queueing outside a medical inspection hut at Chocques, 10 April 1918. They are being guarded by a Royal Scots Fusilier.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244519 © IWM (Q 8687)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6392 on: April 10, 2018, 03:50:49 AM »
R.I.P. (From the Imperial War Museum.)


Quote
Lieutenant Hugh Searle Coppock. Unit: 3rd Battalion, attached to 2nd Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment (possibly also to 8th Battalion). Transferred to 28th Battalion, London Regiment as Private (service number 6136). Death: 10 April 1918 Killed in action Western Front. Son of Mr. H. Carmock Coppock and Mrs. I. V. O. Coppock, of Cannock Chase, Westholme, Vancouver Island, British Columbia.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205292658 © IWM (HU 120365)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6393 on: April 10, 2018, 04:00:59 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, April 10, 1918.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6394 on: April 11, 2018, 03:37:21 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, April 11, 1918.


Quote
Battle of Hazebrouck. Men evacuating stores from a forward dump at Merville onto a barge, to prevent them falling into German hands, 11 April 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238443 © IWM (Q 6509)


Quote
Battle of Estaires. A Royal Engineers officer fixing a demolition charge in readiness for blowing up a bridge over the La Bassee Canal at Bethune, 11 April 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246539 © IWM (Q 10889)


Quote
Royal Engineers timber dump set on fire before the British retreat. Merville, 11 April 1918, the day of its surrender to the Germans.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239661 © IWM (Q 7860)


Quote
Royal Engineers timber dump set on fire before the British retreat. Merville, 11 April 1918, the day of its surrender to the Germans.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239660 © IWM (Q 7859)

 

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6395 on: April 11, 2018, 03:46:29 AM »
R.I.P. (From the Imperial War Museum.)


Quote
PRIVATE JOSEPH NATHAN, 22ND (3RD TYNESIDE SCOTTISH) BATTALION, NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS. Private Nathan was posted missing, believed killed in action, on 11 April 1918 during the German Spring Offensive on the Western Front. At the time, his battalion was fighting in the Estaire-Lys line near Armentieres. During this action, it sustained such heavy losses that it was subsequently reduced to cadre strength and withdrawn from the Western Front. Private Nathan is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205026147 © IWM (HU 96694)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6396 on: April 12, 2018, 03:27:13 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, April 12, 1918.


WRESTLE AND FIGHT TO DRAW AT AIRDOME

  Bull Montana failed to throw Berne and Berne failed to throw Bull Montana in the wrestling bout at the Airdome last night. Referee King Pearce called it a draw. The boxing contest between Bromeo and Morrison was also declared a draw after both men had been punished by each other. There was  a large crowd.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6397 on: April 12, 2018, 03:35:34 AM »
R.I.P. (From the Imperial War Museum.)


Quote
Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Stewart DSO MC. Unit: 94th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps. Death: 12 April 1918 Borre, France Western Front. Son of Capt. and Mrs. Stewart, of Kilkenny; husband of Muriel Dalzell Stewart, of 4, Rostrevor Terrace, Ratligar, Dublin.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205389203 © IWM (HU 118598)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6398 on: April 12, 2018, 11:34:21 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, April 12, 1918.


WRESTLE AND FIGHT TO DRAW AT AIRDOME

  Bull Montana failed to throw Berne and Berne failed to throw Bull Montana in the wrestling bout at the Airdome last night. Referee King Pearce called it a draw. The boxing contest between Bromeo and Morrison was also declared a draw after both men had been punished by each other. There was  a large crowd.

Two draws. LoL what's the odds on that?

Just looked up the average hourly wages for 1918:

Average national hourly wages:  $0.56. Per hour.

General admission for the event $2.00.

With the price of admission and  a few Growlers a whole days wages were blown on two draws :(

https://www.jstor.org/stable/1820827?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6399 on: April 12, 2018, 11:50:44 AM »
Two draws. LoL what's the odds on that?


Just looked up the average pay for 1918.
Average national pay:  $0.56. Per hour.
General admission for the event $2.00.

https://www.jstor.org/stable/1820827?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
I wonder how this would compare to a modern day wrasslin' match? I haven't been since I was a kid but imagine like all sports the ticket prices are steep.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6400 on: April 12, 2018, 03:13:08 PM »
I wonder how this would compare to a modern day wrasslin' match? I haven't been since I was a kid but imagine like all sports the ticket prices are steep.

Given that event tickets can often approach $100 or more these days I'm thinking more like two or three days wages now.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6401 on: April 12, 2018, 04:59:44 PM »
I wonder how this would compare to a modern day wrasslin' match? I haven't been since I was a kid but imagine like all sports the ticket prices are steep.

I have a lot of memories of watching west coast wrestling with my dad during the 1960's.  I can't recall exactly how much was charged for tickets, but it might have been $3.00 for bleacher seats, and $4.00 or $5.00 for ringside seats.  I do know that it was top flight entertainment for the money paid.  If you look up famous  professional wrestlers from the 1960's then you will see a number of them that I got to watch wrestle.  Lou Thesz was the champion at that time, and he stopped for a match, and put up his belt for it.  I got to see Mad Dog Vachon finish a match and head for the locker room in the totally wrong direction.  (He pushed open the door and strode into the lobby.  I'll never forget his startled reaction.  Everyone was laughing at him but then he just spun around and walked back to the locker room as if nothing odd had happened.)   I watched the 600 plus pound Haystack (or Haystacks as some people called him) Calhoun wrestle a team of midgets.  Before the match they allowed us kids to get in line and get his autograph.  Dad folded me a pc. of notebook paper so I went and got the wrestler's autograph.  (Long since lost.)  I remember how hard Haystack was breathing when he signed it, and this before he even climbed into the ring.

My favorite wrestler to watch was Dick Beyer (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dick_Beyer) who wrestled as the masked Destroyer.  He was a villain and everybody hated him except me.  I would cheer him on, much to the annoyance of the people sitting by me. As the years rolled by I was sure that Dick was no longer with us but wonders of wonders, he is very much alive and is living in Buffalo, New York.  He even had his own website and I was able to buy an autographed Destroyer bobble head doll from him.   

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6402 on: April 12, 2018, 05:17:45 PM »
I have a lot of memories of watching west coast wrestling with my dad during the 1960's.  I can't recall exactly how much was charged for tickets, but it might have been $3.00 for bleacher seats, and $4.00 or $5.00 for ringside seats.  I do know that it was top flight entertainment for the money paid.  If you look up famous  professional wrestlers from the 1960's then you will see a number of them that I got to watch wrestle.  Lou Thesz was the champion at that time, and he stopped for a match, and put up his belt for it.  I got to see Mad Dog Vachon finish a match and head for the locker room in the totally wrong direction.  (He pushed open the door and strode into the lobby.  I'll never forget his startled reaction.  Everyone was laughing at him but then he just spun around and walked back to the locker room as if nothing odd had happened.)   I watched the 600 plus pound Haystack (or Haystacks as some people called him) Calhoun wrestle a team of midgets.  Before the match they allowed us kids to get in line and get his autograph.  Dad folded me a pc. of notebook paper so I went and got the wrestler's autograph.  (Long since lost.)  I remember how hard Haystack was breathing when he signed it, and this before he even climbed into the ring.

My favorite wrestler to watch was Dick Beyer (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dick_Beyer) who wrestled as the masked Destroyer.  He was a villain and everybody hated him except me.  I would cheer him on, much to the annoyance of the people sitting by me. As the years rolled by I was sure that Dick was no longer with us but wonders of wonders, he is very much alive and is living in Buffalo, New York.  He even had his own website and I was able to buy an autographed Destroyer bobble head doll from him.
That's awesome. And funny about Haystack breathing so hard before the match with the midgets. Dick Beyer was awarded the "Order of the Rising Sun" highest civilian honor in Japan. Wow. I don't think even Mr.Saito or Mr.Fuji got that!

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6403 on: April 13, 2018, 02:56:06 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, April 13, 1918.


Quote
Sopwith 8F.1 Snail single-seat prototype fighter biplane. Serial number C4284. First version with fabric fuselage.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205314695 © IWM (Q 67513)


Quote
Battle of Hazebrouck. A 6-inch Mark VII gun of the Royal Garrison Artillery going back along the main road near Caestre, 13 April 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244539 © IWM (Q 8714)


Quote
A fire in Bethune caused by the German bombardment, 13 April 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246545 © IWM (Q 10896)


Quote
Battle of the Lys. Detachment of the Royal Army Medical Corps marching to the forward area (wheeled stretchers); Acheux-Forceville road.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205077424 © IWM (Q 372)

R.I.P.


Quote
Sergeant George Mountford Ellison 44766. Unit: 7th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment. Death: 13 April 1918 Western Front. Son of Harry and Elsie Ellison; husband of Frances M. Ellison, of 6, Hampstead Rd., Brislington, Bristol. Born at West Bromwich, Staffs.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205294316 © IWM (HU 121744)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6404 on: April 13, 2018, 02:41:23 PM »

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6405 on: April 13, 2018, 07:03:47 PM »
100 Years Ago.

A letter written to Bess Wallace from Harry S. Truman on April 13, 1918:

https://www.trumanlibrary.org/whistlestop/study_collections/trumanpapers/fbpa/index.php?documentVersion=both&documentid=HST-FBP_5-28_01&pagenumber=4
Interesting. It would seem that sailors don't proscribe to the "flat earth theory," ends his sentences with prepositions, and, although not understanding why anybody would want to be a sailor, appreciates their bawdy humor.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6406 on: April 13, 2018, 07:14:58 PM »
Interesting. It would seem that sailors don't proscribe to the "flat earth theory," ends his sentences with prepositions, and, although not understanding why anybody would want to be a sailor, appreciates their bawdy humor.

Kind of a neat letter.  Wonder what he meant by... 
Quote
Everyone has a remedy and none of them work but Christian Science and sometimes it fails in a rough sea.
  Was that a tongue in cheek remark or did he believe in it?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6407 on: April 13, 2018, 07:21:29 PM »
I have a lot of memories of watching west coast wrestling with my dad during the 1960's.  I can't recall exactly how much was charged for tickets, but it might have been $3.00 for bleacher seats, and $4.00 or $5.00 for ringside seats.  I do know that it was top flight entertainment for the money paid.  If you look up famous  professional wrestlers from the 1960's then you will see a number of them that I got to watch wrestle.  Lou Thesz was the champion at that time, and he stopped for a match, and put up his belt for it.  I got to see Mad Dog Vachon finish a match and head for the locker room in the totally wrong direction.  (He pushed open the door and strode into the lobby.  I'll never forget his startled reaction.  Everyone was laughing at him but then he just spun around and walked back to the locker room as if nothing odd had happened.)   I watched the 600 plus pound Haystack (or Haystacks as some people called him) Calhoun wrestle a team of midgets.  Before the match they allowed us kids to get in line and get his autograph.  Dad folded me a pc. of notebook paper so I went and got the wrestler's autograph.  (Long since lost.)  I remember how hard Haystack was breathing when he signed it, and this before he even climbed into the ring.

My favorite wrestler to watch was Dick Beyer (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dick_Beyer) who wrestled as the masked Destroyer.  He was a villain and everybody hated him except me.  I would cheer him on, much to the annoyance of the people sitting by me. As the years rolled by I was sure that Dick was no longer with us but wonders of wonders, he is very much alive and is living in Buffalo, New York.  He even had his own website and I was able to buy an autographed Destroyer bobble head doll from him.

Wow wish I would have gone! Never went to a live match but watched all those guys on TV.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6408 on: April 13, 2018, 07:26:31 PM »
Kind of a neat letter.  Wonder what he meant by...    Was that a tongue in cheek remark or did he believe in it?
From what I can tell he was Baptist?

"Baptist. Member, American Legion; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Eagles; Elks; Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Alpha Delta."
http://www.adherents.com/people/pt/Harry_S_Truman.html
But Wiki says he went to a Presbyterian Sunday school and also worked as a "shabbos goy" (certain Jews can't work on Saturday so they hire goyim to do their chores for them.)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_S._Truman

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6409 on: April 13, 2018, 07:27:40 PM »
Wow wish I would have gone! Never went to a live match but watched all those guys on TV.

I wish you could have been there too, WC.  You would have liked it.  I swear, their matches were brilliantly choreographed.  They had us spectators yelling, booing, cheering and over all whooping it up. When you walked outside afterwards, it felt like you had really been through something.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6410 on: April 13, 2018, 07:33:45 PM »
From what I can tell he was Baptist?

"Baptist. Member, American Legion; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Eagles; Elks; Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Alpha Delta."
http://www.adherents.com/people/pt/Harry_S_Truman.html
But Wiki says he went to a Presbyterian Sunday school and also worked as a "shabbos goy" (certain Jews can't work on Saturday so they hire goyim to do their chores for them.)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_S._Truman

Thanks. It occurred to me after I made the post that he was possibly saying that nothing but mind power could overcome the seasickness.  Ha, I bet those bawdy sailors had lots of remedies for seasickness.   

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6411 on: April 13, 2018, 07:38:08 PM »
I wish you could have been there too, WC.  You would have liked it.  I swear, their matches were brilliantly choreographed.  They had us spectators yelling, booing, cheering and over all whooping it up. When you walked outside afterwards, it felt like you had really been through something.

Do you remember if any of the midwest wrestlers came out to your area for a match. Da Crusher was a local favorite that we watched on TV.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.jsonline.com/amp/440673002

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6412 on: April 13, 2018, 07:50:22 PM »
Do you remember if any of the midwest wrestlers came out to your area for a match. Da Crusher was a local favorite that we watched on TV.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.jsonline.com/amp/440673002
I hope they get  the statue up. I recall watching the "Minnesota Wrecking Crew" (Ole and Arn Anderson) in some crazy "bunkhouse matches" unfortunately never say them live. Apparently in the Upper-Midwest "anything goes" fights would happen in lumber camps, hence the "bunkhouse match." Where "anything" could be brought into the ring and used as a weapon. That was the gimmick. Loved it.

Decades later the great Phil Hendrie had a fake show in which he, as a "gay journalist," reporting on the election and described a phenomena of "bunkhouse swap" in which burly men would become homosexual and that "if Nadar* wasn't elected all gays would strike- which would include most cowboys, police, soldiers, EMTs- and all pilots and firefighters." "Phil you are adding an addition on, right?" "Yeah." "Well good luck because all construction workers will strike." Callers were outraged, great radio.

* Phil: "there is no proof that Nadar is gay..."
   Gay Journalist: "his belt matches his shoes, he likes the environment, and safety- close enough for rock-n-roll..."

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6413 on: April 15, 2018, 03:23:42 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, April 15, 1918.


Quote
Soldier with a cage of canaries from a ruined house in St. Venant, 15 April 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246550 © IWM (Q 10903)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6414 on: April 16, 2018, 03:09:31 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, April 16, 1918.


Quote
The Battle of the Lys. A French armoured car supporting two companies of the 18th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment (Composite Force, 15th Corps). Meteren, 16 April 1918. Note a British wounded being escorted in the background.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238546 © IWM (Q 6639)


Quote
Wounded horses at No. 23 Veterinary Hospital in the French Artillery barracks at St. Omer, 16 April 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246553 © IWM (Q 10906)


R.I.P.


Quote
Driver Sidney Woodbury 285. Unit: 4th Section, 5th Australian Machine Gun Company, 2nd Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Death: 16 April 1918 Killed in Action Western Front. Son of Edwin Joseph and Anna Woodbury; husband of H. H. Woodbury, of "Colebrook," Keir Avenue, Hurlstone Park, New South Wales. Native of Hawkesbury River, New South Wales. CWGC has age at death given as 32.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205391082 © IWM (HU 127870)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6415 on: April 16, 2018, 03:24:14 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Seattle Star, April 16, 1918.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6416 on: April 16, 2018, 03:41:58 AM »
British comedian Spike Milligan was born 100 years ago today.
 
Bio and photos:   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spike_Milligan
Quote
He was a strident campaigner on environmental matters, particularly arguing against unnecessary noise, such as the use of "muzak"

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6417 on: April 16, 2018, 11:02:12 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Seattle Star, April 16, 1918.

My mom gets pissed over that same exact thing. Nothing ever changes.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6418 on: April 17, 2018, 02:48:21 AM »
My mom gets pissed over that same exact thing. Nothing ever changes.

Wow!  Isn't that something.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6419 on: April 17, 2018, 03:02:08 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, April 17, 1918.


Quote
A distant German shell burst, note camouflage screen in distance and ruins on outskirts of Guinchy on the right. 1st Division Front, 17 April 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246560 © IWM (Q 10913)


Quote
Two men of the 1st Battalion, Cameron Highlanders, crossing a space in Cuinchy within view and range of German machine-gun fire. Cuinchy was in the front line for four years. 1st Division, 17 April 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246562 © IWM (Q 10915)


Quote
Gunners of the Royal Garrison Artillery firing a 9.2 inch railway gun by its crane. Near Bethune, 17 April 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247179 © IWM (Q 11599)


Quote
A dummy soldier posted outside a tent; near Arras, 17th April 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205077477 © IWM (Q 439)


R.I.P.


Quote
Lieutenant Thomas Real O’Sullivan 2763. Unit: 41st Battalion, Australian Infantry, Australian Imperial Force. Death: 17 April 1918 Western Front. Son of Thomas and Rose O'sullivan, of Toowong, Brisbane, Queensland.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205386594 © IWM (HU 124616)