Author Topic: One Hundred Years Ago  (Read 279519 times)

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Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6030 on: January 08, 2018, 02:58:33 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum.


Quote
Two British soldiers helping to push a car back on to the road after it skidded in the snow, Poperinghe, 8 January, 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244279 © IWM (Q 8407)


Quote
A wiring party at work in the snow near Ypres, 8 January 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244281 © IWM (Q 8409)


Quote
Troops marching down from the line in the snow near Ypres, 8 January 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244283 © IWM (Q 8411)


Quote
Horse-drawn transport column passing through the snow-covered square of Ypres, 8 January 19l8.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245529 © IWM (Q 9803)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6031 on: January 08, 2018, 04:00:10 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, January 8, 1918.


NET SPREAD OVER STATE FOR APREHENSION OF JAIL ESCAPEE

  Paddy Cannon, who escaped from the county jail yesterday, has not been located. Sheriff Thomas has wired a description of the man to cities east and west and this afternoon left town in his machine for a destination not made public in the hope of apprehending the man.

  Cannon got out through a window on the southwest side of the jail building. It is probable that he was aided by an accomplice outside, evidently a saw being passed through the window from the outside, Cannon sawing an iron bar through with it.

  At what time the prisoner made his get-away isn't known exactly, his absence and the severed bar not being discovered until Under Sheriff N.U. Schade went to admit the man who brings the supper meal to the prisoners at 8 p. m.
 
  Cannon had been in jail since October awaiting trial on a charge of grand larceny in connection with the theft of belting stolen from the Tonopah Extension Mining company. There was also a rumor that federal sleuths suspected him of having taken part in several post office robberies in this state.

  Sheriff Thomas said this afternoon: "Every possible means will be taken to apprehend Cannon. The escape was cleverly and daringly accomplished, and blame cannot be justly placed upon any of the attaches of my office. I was in Carson yesterday, having gone there with Cline and Edwards, sentenced to penitentiary terms, and upon receipt of a telegram apprising me of the escape of Cannon last night I returned immediately to take part in the search, which will be pressed until Cannon is apprehended."


ORDINANCE TO BE STRICTLY ENFORCED BY OFFICIALS

  The officials will hereafter enforce the traffic ordinance strictly. Two more days of leeway will be given offenders and then arrests will be made, instead of warnings.


JACK GRANT, chief of police, continues to improve rapidly from the effects of his operation for appendicitis.


BERNE-THEOPHELUS MATCH IS PROBABLE

  If a conference of local businessmen late this afternoon establishes agreement, William Berne, the Russian bear cat, will be matched to meet the assertive Mr. Crith Theophelus, whose forefathers for twenty centuries have been wlnner-take-all mat artists, he says.

  Berne opines that this fellow Theophelus is full of talk and egotism and may have classic ancestors, but as for throwing him, well he'll need all his ancestors and then some, Berne says. 

  The match, if held, will be put on at night.

  The local Greek colony has already rallied to the standard of Theophelus, and that has distinctly interested the Slavonians.

  Berne postponed his departure, planned for today, in the hope that the match will be arranged.


CHRISTMAS DINNER YESTERDAY

  Among the non-Slavs who in a measure observed the Russian Christmas yesterday were Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Clark, who were entertained at a Christmas dinner by John Kovadovlch.



DEATH OF OLD RESIDENT
 
   Joseph Lavignlnl, the oldest resident of Manhattan, was burled Monday afternoon. He was found dead in his bedroom Sunday morning. death resulting from old age.

  Lavlgnlnl fought in both the wars of Garibaldi and for forty-nine years was a resident of this state.

  At one time he possessed considerable wealth.
 









Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6032 on: January 09, 2018, 02:41:36 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum.


Quote
The British socialist, trade unionist and founding member of the Independant Labour Party, Mr Ben Tillett, shakes hands with British troops in the back of a lorry during his visit to the Western Front at Ypres, 9 January 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244292 © IWM (Q 8420)


Quote
Prominent British Socialist, Trade Unionist and founding member of the Independant Labour Party, Mr. Ben Tillett is seen testing the food at a British Army field kitchen in Ypres, 9 January 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244293 © IWM (Q 8421)


Quote
Prominent British socialist, trade unionist and founding member of the Independant Labour Party, Mr Ben Tillett is seen drinking coffee with troops at a Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) depot in Ypres, 9 January 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244294 © IWM (Q 8422)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6033 on: January 09, 2018, 02:50:25 AM »
Glad to read that the Chief is recovering! Thanks Rix for the update.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6034 on: January 09, 2018, 03:15:12 AM »
Glad to read that the Chief is recovering! Thanks Rix for the update.

You bet!  It's fun to find out what's going on with the fine people of Tonopah.  Right now I'm wondering if the cops will be able to apprehend that escapee, Paddy Cannon.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6035 on: January 09, 2018, 03:22:38 AM »
You bet!  It's fun to find out what's going on with the fine people of Tonopah.  Right now I'm wondering if the cops will be able to apprehend that escapee, Paddy Cannon.

My money is on,  that Paddy met his demise in harsh desert environment. If no body found we may never know.

Since we are still fighting WWI .. hope I live long enough to see how that long play human folly turns out ;)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6036 on: January 09, 2018, 03:26:59 AM »
My money is on,  that Paddy met his demise in harsh desert environment. If no body found we may never know.

Could be.  I was thinking that whoever slipped him that saw also helped get him out of town.  Anyway, the sheriff gets to ride around in his auto (at county expense) looking for the dude.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6037 on: January 09, 2018, 03:28:12 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, January 9, 1918.


GREEK SIGNS UP WITH MUSCOVITE -
THEOPHELUS TO THROW BERNE TWICE IN ONE HOUR OR FORFEIT THE MATCH.


  While others were considering whether or not to risk their money in the promotion of a match between William Berne and Chris Theophelus yesterday, Bert Steinberger, owner of the Big Casino theater, had the signed articles in his pocket.

  As the articles were being drawn up Monday night Steinberger suggested to Theophelus that he be introduced to the Russian.

  "I wouldn't shake hands with him," said the Greek with much dignity.

  Later Berne passed Theophelus and the latter whistled a whistle of mock admiration. . "Is THAT the Russian champion?" he asked of no one in particular. "My my!"

  Berne told him that he was booked for the hospital in terms a little less polite than that.

  If the verbal set-to was "press agent" stuff it was very well done, and just to prove that the grudge is real, Theophelus signed the winner-take-all articles, in which be agrees to throw Berne twice in an hour or forfeit the match. Even if he throws Berne once in that hour, he gets nothing and Berne gets the whole of the wrestlers' share of the money taken in. Tacked to those extra ordinary conditions is a $500 side bet.

  Berne avers that he doesn't know what kind of hop Theophelus smokes, but he is not averse to taking advantage of the generous handicap. The Russian is confident he can throw Theophelus. The Greek is not saying a thing. He's busy giving a correct imitation of a hard boiled egg.

  Berne started his training today with about eight miles of road work.

  The match will be held in the Big Casino theater Saturday night next and the gong will sound promptly at 7 o'clock. Steinberger expects a big audience and is prepared to take care of 1000. Admission will be $1 and $2.

  Theophelus certainly isn't going to want for matches on the terms he is offering. Victor Ajax of Goldfleld, who claims the lightweight wrestling championship of the world, sends the following communication to the Bonanza:

  "Please announce in the columns of the Bonanza that I accept the challenge issued by Crith Theophelus, in which he offers to throw me within one hour or forfeit $100. Also please state that I will wager $500 that he fails to throw me within the time specified."

  Ajax has the money ready to put up.


NO TRACE OF CANNON.
 
  The sheriff's office was today without clue as to the whereabouts of Paddy Cannon, who escaped jail Monday afternoon by sawing through an iron bar. As yet none of the police department of the cities wired to have replied.

  Sheriff Thomas left Tonopah at 1 o'clock in his automobile to continue the search.


LOWEST TEMPERATURE RECORDED THIS MORNING

 
  At 8 o'clock this morning the thermometer registered 18 above zero, the lowest temperature recorded so far this winter. The weatherman says that it will be even colder tomorrow.

  A small flurry of snow was visible at 2 o'clock this afternoon.


JAMES FERREY INJURED.
 
  James P. Ferry received deep scalp wounds on the top of his head Monday when struck by a windlass while at work for the Tonopah Dairy. He is now at the county hospital as a private patient. The injuries, while painful, are not considered dangerous.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6038 on: January 09, 2018, 12:29:55 PM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, January 9, 1918.


GREEK SIGNS UP WITH MUSCOVITE -
THEOPHELUS TO THROW BERNE TWICE IN ONE HOUR OR FORFEIT THE MATCH.


  While others were considering whether or not to risk their money in the promotion of a match between William Berne and Chris Theophelus yesterday, Bert Steinberger, owner of the Big Casino theater, had the signed articles in his pocket.

  As the articles were being drawn up Monday night Steinberger suggested to Theophelus that he be introduced to the Russian.

  "I wouldn't shake hands with him," said the Greek with much dignity.

  Later Berne passed Theophelus and the latter whistled a whistle of mock admiration. . "Is THAT the Russian champion?" he asked of no one in particular. "My my!"

  Berne told him that he was booked for the hospital in terms a little less polite than that.

  If the verbal set-to was "press agent" stuff it was very well done, and just to prove that the grudge is real, Theophelus signed the winner-take-all articles, in which be agrees to throw Berne twice in an hour or forfeit the match. Even if he throws Berne once in that hour, he gets nothing and Berne gets the whole of the wrestlers' share of the money taken in. Tacked to those extra ordinary conditions is a $500 side bet.

  Berne avers that he doesn't know what kind of hop Theophelus smokes, but he is not averse to taking advantage of the generous handicap. The Russian is confident he can throw Theophelus. The Greek is not saying a thing. He's busy giving a correct imitation of a hard boiled egg.

  Berne started his training today with about eight miles of road work.

  The match will be held in the Big Casino theater Saturday night next and the gong will sound promptly at 7 o'clock. Steinberger expects a big audience and is prepared to take care of 1000. Admission will be $1 and $2.

  Theophelus certainly isn't going to want for matches on the terms he is offering. Victor Ajax of Goldfleld, who claims the lightweight wrestling championship of the world, sends the following communication to the Bonanza:

  "Please announce in the columns of the Bonanza that I accept the challenge issued by Crith Theophelus, in which he offers to throw me within one hour or forfeit $100. Also please state that I will wager $500 that he fails to throw me within the time specified."

  Ajax has the money ready to put up.


NO TRACE OF CANNON.
 
  The sheriff's office was today without clue as to the whereabouts of Paddy Cannon, who escaped jail Monday afternoon by sawing through an iron bar. As yet none of the police department of the cities wired to have replied.

  Sheriff Thomas left Tonopah at 1 o'clock in his automobile to continue the search.


LOWEST TEMPERATURE RECORDED THIS MORNING

 
  At 8 o'clock this morning the thermometer registered 18 above zero, the lowest temperature recorded so far this winter. The weatherman says that it will be even colder tomorrow.

  A small flurry of snow was visible at 2 o'clock this afternoon.


JAMES FERREY INJURED.
 
  James P. Ferry received deep scalp wounds on the top of his head Monday when struck by a windlass while at work for the Tonopah Dairy. He is now at the county hospital as a private patient. The injuries, while painful, are not considered dangerous.
James P. Ferrey should undergo the concussion protocol.

I hope our beloved Sheriff is healthy enough to deal with whatever ethnic tensions might arise between the Greeks and the Slovians during this epic wrestling match! I look forward to the match and the result and thinking, "Crith" might prevail. (What great sports reporting and staging.hype by the managers and wrestlers for the match though!)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6039 on: January 09, 2018, 02:51:51 PM »
James P. Ferrey should undergo the concussion protocol.

I hope our beloved Sheriff is healthy enough to deal with whatever ethnic tensions might arise between the Greeks and the Slovians during this epic wrestling match! I look forward to the match and the result and thinking, "Crith" might prevail. (What great sports reporting and staging.hype by the managers and wrestlers for the match though!)

I'll stick with the Russian, for no other reason than cheat reading the Greek's bio above.  He was heavy into glitz, more so than strength, so two falls might be beyond his reach.  Although I can envision a second fall coming seconds after the 'gong' rings out, thus insuring a second grudge match. 

I'm kind of surprised that this one hour match is the only one listed for the program.  I wonder if the promoters will pad the show out a bit, at least to 90 minutes or so.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6040 on: January 09, 2018, 06:56:40 PM »
There was a fight against some Indians by government forces one hundred years ago.  I think it is considered to be the final conflict between the Red Man and the Federal Government.  It was called The Battle of Bear Valley and the Army soldiers won by a score of ten (one killed and nine captured) to nothing.

Info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bear_Valley


United States 10th Cavalry troops holding ten Yaqui native Americans on January 9th, 1918.
By 10th Cavalry Regiment, United States Army - www.huachucaillustrated.com, (invalid link) Public Domain, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=28071423

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6041 on: January 10, 2018, 05:14:02 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, January 10, 1918.


PLACER MINER OF CENTRAL KILLED TODAY

  MANHATTAN, Nev., Jan. 10.
  Teodore Zunninl, owner of a placer mine in Central, three miles below Manhattan, was instantly killed at 9:30 o'clock this morning by a bucket of gravel falling on him. The gravel was being hoisted when the band broke at the collar of the shaft and let it fall. The bucket struck Zunninl on the small of the back, shattering the backbone.

  Zunninl was 40 years old and a native of Italy, where his wife and two daughters are now living. His two brothers, Ben and Angelo, and two cousins, Victor and Mario Zunninl, all live in Manhattan.


COLD SNAP FREEZES PIPES; 6 AB0VE ZERO

  Weather Forecaster Asher reported that at 5 o'clock this morning the thermometer dropped to six degrees above zero. A number of water pipes were frozen and some of them burst. So as not to again be taken by surprise by a cold snap housewives are resolving to use the shut-off drains hereafter.
 
  This after noon the Bonanza's type setting machine was forced to halt because of lack of gas, the gas office reporting that the cold had blocked the pipes.

  Asher said today that the barometer is rising again, indicating that the storm has gone, so that chance for snow in the immediate future is slight.


EXTENSION SHOP IS DAMAGED BY BLAZE

  A fire, caused by the blowing of live coals from the forge by the high wind last night, caused $2,000 damage to the building housing the blacksmith shop of the Tonopah Extension mine at 10:45 o'clock last night. It is believed that the coals came in contact with some coal oil. About one-third of tbe structure was destroyed; the machine shop, separated by only a thin partition was not injured beyond being flooded.

  Two of the Extension fire hoses, manned by the fire department, was playing on the fire within a few minutes after the sounding of the alarm. Later a city line was connected up and another Extension line was also used.

  The alarm was turned in by Mrs. Roy Davenport, who lives in one of the company houses nearby. She explained that she had watched the blaze for some minutes, thinking that someone else had turned in the alarm.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6042 on: January 11, 2018, 02:41:24 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum.


Quote
Men from the Royal Artillery outside the German pill box which they used as a dug-out, near Wieltje, 11 January 1918. The ground surrounding the pillbox is waterlogged and shell-marked, indications of the heavy fighting and subsequent bad weather in the area.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244297 © IWM (Q 8426)


Quote
A British soldier stands inside a group of iron stakes which were to be the framework of a German pillbox, Waterloo Farm, near Broodseinde, 11 January, 1918. The shell-marked ground is waterlogged.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205196051 © IWM (Q 8425)


Quote
The remains of a motor lorry beside a plank causeway through the mud near Ypres, 11 January 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244295 © IWM (Q 8423)

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6043 on: January 11, 2018, 03:19:24 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, January 11, 1918.


GOLDFIELD KNIGHTS ARRANGE GOOD MATCH

  Victor Ajax and Charlie Pine have signed for a 20-minute wrestling exhibition at the mid-winter carnival of the Knights of Columbus to be held next Tuesday night in the Hippodrome at Goldfield.

  Pine is a 185-pound man who came here recently from Arizona, after a number of successful matches there, and is said to be a good enough man to give the crowd a line on the present condition of Ajax which will be an interesting feature of the match to many people, as it is rumored that Victor is about to again go on the mat. He is now understood to be arranging to sign for a match in Tonopah in the near future.

  Victor is the biggest drawing card, in the opinion of those who follow sports, that the Knights could obtain, as it is always worth going a long way to see the veteran in an exhibition of his uncanny knowledge of the game of which he is a past master. He is now known to be in training and after putting the Masked Marvel in condition for his recent match in Tonopah it is thought that Pine may learn many things from him in twenty minutes.

  Victor's clever exhibition against the fast Tony Ball in the Hippodrome in the summer of 1916 has not yet been forgotten by those who witnessed it, and it is believed that the prospect of seeing him in action again would alone draw a big crowd.

  Sergeant Bryson of the British army, who returned here last evening, has agreed to go on for four rounds of sparring and Young Peterson, who may be remembered as having fought Kid Bromeo on one occasion, will also appear for four rounds. A number of other clever local boys who have been seen in the ring on previous occasions will meet boxers from Tonopah, who have not yet been signed.

  Johnny Morrison will also reappear and an effort is now being made to secure as his opponent a boy who has been fighting in Ely and is now in Tonopah. It is known that if this particular boxer can be secured a fast exhibition will result.

  The Eagles' band has been secured for the night, as has Damon's orchestra, and other features of the carnival aside from the athletic events will soon be ready to announce.

  All the boxing exhibitions and the wrestling match will be refereed by Billy Shue. 


MEXICAN UP ON CHARGE OF THREAT TO SHOOT

  At 5 o'clock this afternoon Justice Dunseath will have a Mexican who lives in a cabin below the depot before him on a charge of threatening the life of Bob Hecinovich. Hecinovich says the Mexican pointed a rifle at him. The Mexican, who lives with his squaw wife next to the Hecinovich house, says it was a mistake that he can explain.


PADDY CANNON LEAVES NO CLUES AS TO WHEREABOUTS

  Paddy Cannon is still at liberty and so clean an escape did he make that not a single clue as to the direction he took or his present whereabouts was left behind. Sheriff Thomas believes that an accomplice rushed him out of the state in an automobile, getting him across the line before dawn of the day following the escape.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6044 on: January 11, 2018, 09:41:02 PM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, January 11, 1918.


GOLDFIELD KNIGHTS ARRANGE GOOD MATCH

  Victor Ajax and Charlie Pine have signed for a 20-minute wrestling exhibition at the mid-winter carnival of the Knights of Columbus to be held next Tuesday night in the Hippodrome at Goldfield.

  Pine is a 185-pound man who came here recently from Arizona, after a number of successful matches there, and is said to be a good enough man to give the crowd a line on the present condition of Ajax which will be an interesting feature of the match to many people, as it is rumored that Victor is about to again go on the mat. He is now understood to be arranging to sign for a match in Tonopah in the near future.

  Victor is the biggest drawing card, in the opinion of those who follow sports, that the Knights could obtain, as it is always worth going a long way to see the veteran in an exhibition of his uncanny knowledge of the game of which he is a past master. He is now known to be in training and after putting the Masked Marvel in condition for his recent match in Tonopah it is thought that Pine may learn many things from him in twenty minutes.

  Victor's clever exhibition against the fast Tony Ball in the Hippodrome in the summer of 1916 has not yet been forgotten by those who witnessed it, and it is believed that the prospect of seeing him in action again would alone draw a big crowd.

  Sergeant Bryson of the British army, who returned here last evening, has agreed to go on for four rounds of sparring and Young Peterson, who may be remembered as having fought Kid Bromeo on one occasion, will also appear for four rounds. A number of other clever local boys who have been seen in the ring on previous occasions will meet boxers from Tonopah, who have not yet been signed.

  Johnny Morrison will also reappear and an effort is now being made to secure as his opponent a boy who has been fighting in Ely and is now in Tonopah. It is known that if this particular boxer can be secured a fast exhibition will result.

  The Eagles' band has been secured for the night, as has Damon's orchestra, and other features of the carnival aside from the athletic events will soon be ready to announce.

  All the boxing exhibitions and the wrestling match will be refereed by Billy Shue


MEXICAN UP ON CHARGE OF THREAT TO SHOOT

  At 5 o'clock this afternoon Justice Dunseath will have a Mexican who lives in a cabin below the depot before him on a charge of threatening the life of Bob Hecinovich. Hecinovich says the Mexican pointed a rifle at him. The Mexican, who lives with his squaw wife next to the Hecinovich house, says it was a mistake that he can explain.


PADDY CANNON LEAVES NO CLUES AS TO WHEREABOUTS

  Paddy Cannon is still at liberty and so clean an escape did he make that not a single clue as to the direction he took or his present whereabouts was left behind. Sheriff Thomas believes that an accomplice rushed him out of the state in an automobile, getting him across the line before dawn of the day following the escape.
My weak google searches gives me some modern actor but was surprised The Eagles were doing gigs back then. They are older than I even thought last time they toured!

The "crime report" was lacking, in my mind, with regard to more racial/ethnic/religious trigger-words and "dog-whistles," as they are called now. Clearly the "Paddy" case could've mentioned some Fenian sympathies or criminal tendencies towards drink and fights. And in the former case it should have been made clear that while most "Mexicans" use knives that the use of a rifle was a more unique situation. Maybe brought upon by his Indian squaw wife being affiliated with Comancheros and gun running. And the obvious, no commentary on the Slavic Hecinovich, at least some passing comment on that.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6045 on: January 11, 2018, 10:42:07 PM »
My weak google searches gives me some modern actor but was surprised The Eagles were doing gigs back then. They are older than I even thought last time they toured!

The "crime report" was lacking, in my mind, with regard to more racial/ethnic/religious trigger-words and "dog-whistles," as they are called now. Clearly the "Paddy" case could've mentioned some Fenian sympathies or criminal tendencies towards drink and fights. And in the former case it should have been made clear that while most "Mexicans" use knives that the use of a rifle was a more unique situation. Maybe brought upon by his Indian squaw wife being affiliated with Comancheros and gun running. And the obvious, no commentary on the Slavic Hecinovich, at least some passing comment on that.

Yeah, even giving Glenn Frey the benefit of the doubt that he was at least twenty years old back in 1918, that would still make him about 118 at the time of his death back in 2016.  Not a bad run, actually.


Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6047 on: January 12, 2018, 03:20:17 AM »
I should have never shut-down Militaryphotos.net. I'm sorry. I just wanted revenge for them tricking me into going off with the Rhodesian SAS.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6048 on: January 12, 2018, 03:41:21 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, January 12, 1918.


MYSTERIOUS LIGHT IN SKY PAYS SECOND VISIT

  John Delks, who last Monday night saw a mysterious light, supposedly some sort of air machine, was vindicated last night. This time the mysterious moving light was seen by a large number of people, all of whom agreed upon the general aspect of the visitor. The light was seen over Mount Brougher at about 7 o'clock last evening. It was moving in a southwesterly direction. Most of those who saw it declare there were two lights, apparently a machine with two headlights.

  Flights of any sort of aircraft, except those manned by United States army men, are absolutely forbidden.

  Weatherman Asher declares that there can be no sound meteorological explanation for the phenomenon, so the mysterious lights are pleasantly inexplicable.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6049 on: January 13, 2018, 03:44:50 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum.


Quote
A general scene showing men of the York and Lancaster Regiment, probably 2/4th Battalion part of the 187th Brigade, using a machine gun mounted for anti-aircraft use, in trenches on the 62nd Division Front between Oppy and Gavrelle.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205196045 © IWM (Q 8430)


Quote
An officer of the York and Lancaster Regiment, probably 2/4th Battalion in the 187th Brigade, checks the gas respirators of his men in a trench on the 62nd Division Front between Oppy and Gavrelle, 13 January, 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244303 © IWM (Q 8433)


From the Europeana Collection.


Inspection of the Kaiserschützenregiment.Nr.3 by S.M. Emperor Charles I, Mezzolombardo. Date: January 13, 1918.
https://www.europeana.eu/portal/en/record/9200291/BibliographicResource_3000073604402.htmlutm_source=api&utm_medium=api&utm_campaign=api2demo http://www.bildarchivaustria.at/Pages/Search/Result.aspx?p_eBildansicht=2&p_ItemID=1 https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/


Triangulation in the conquered area of Italy. Date: January 13, 1918.
https://www.europeana.eu/portal/en/record/9200291/BibliographicResource_3000073493315.html?utm_source=api&utm_medium=api&utm_campaign=api2demohttp://www.bildarchivaustria.at/Pages/Search/Result.aspx?p_eBildansicht=2&p_ItemID=2 https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6050 on: January 13, 2018, 07:26:14 PM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, January 12, 1918.


MYSTERIOUS LIGHT IN SKY PAYS SECOND VISIT

  John Delks, who last Monday night saw a mysterious light, supposedly some sort of air machine, was vindicated last night. This time the mysterious moving light was seen by a large number of people, all of whom agreed upon the general aspect of the visitor. The light was seen over Mount Brougher at about 7 o'clock last evening. It was moving in a southwesterly direction. Most of those who saw it declare there were two lights, apparently a machine with two headlights.

  Flights of any sort of aircraft, except those manned by United States army men, are absolutely forbidden.

  Weatherman Asher declares that there can be no sound meteorological explanation for the phenomenon, so the mysterious lights are pleasantly inexplicable.
I'm sure the exasperated Peter Davenport of the day was tired of official explanations about "Chinese laterns" and also the pesky crank telegraph messages the kids keep doing.
ps: actually an "interesting" report, curious what it was.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6051 on: January 13, 2018, 08:42:37 PM »
I'm sure the exasperated Peter Davenport of the day was tired of official explanations about "Chinese laterns" and also the pesky crank telegraph messages the kids keep doing.
ps: actually an "interesting" report, curious what it was.

Two headlights, hmmm.  A new type of aircraft being tested?  Perhaps Area 51 is older than we thought.  lol

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6052 on: January 14, 2018, 03:01:02 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum.


Quote
British troops arriving to relieve the French on the Seraucourt-le-Grand road, 14 January 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323031 © IWM (Q 78271)


Quote
British field kitchens arriving to relieve the French on the Seraucourt-le-Grand road, 14 January 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323032 © IWM (Q 78272)


Quote
British soldiers in front of the ruins of the sugar factory at Seraucourt-le-Grand, 14 January 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205308694 © IWM (Q 61235)


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Corporal of the Machine Gun Corps traversing German communication trenches at night at Cambrai, 14 January 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238835 © IWM (Q 6969)


From The Europeana Collection.


Czeremoszno: local road. (14 / I.1918).
https://www.europeana.eu/portal/en/record/9200291/BibliographicResource_3000073601713.html?utm_source=api&utm_medium=api&utm_campaign=api2demo  http://www.bildarchivaustria.at/Pages/Search/Result.aspx?p_eBildansicht=2&p_ItemID=1 https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6053 on: January 14, 2018, 03:34:45 AM »
From the Library of Congress.


The Seattle Star, January 14, 1918.




The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, January 14, 1918.

SHERIFF SELLS LIBERTY THEATER HOLDINGS

  This morning at 10 o'clock Sheriff W. A. Thomas sold at sheriffs sale the seats and piano of the Liberty Theater. The articles were brought in by Mrs. Jenny D. Turner of Reno for $199.50. She had an attachment against the same for $705.

  The moving picture machine, valued at $750, was not sold, as it is still under attachment and legal questions have arisen in regards to its sale, owing to the lapsing of installments.


NOTICE

  Sunday morning some boys took the hose cart at the depot out on the road and pulled all the hose off the cart, then put the cart back in the house. Mr. Jack Peck of the freight depot notified the fire department of the condition.

  Anyone meddling with anything pertaining to the fire apparatus, except for fire protection, will be immediately prosecuted.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6054 on: January 14, 2018, 03:31:31 PM »
From the Library of Congress.


The Seattle Star, January 14, 1918.




The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, January 14, 1918.

SHERIFF SELLS LIBERTY THEATER HOLDINGS

  This morning at 10 o'clock Sheriff W. A. Thomas sold at sheriffs sale the seats and piano of the Liberty Theater. The articles were brought in by Mrs. Jenny D. Turner of Reno for $199.50. She had an attachment against the same for $705.

  The moving picture machine, valued at $750, was not sold, as it is still under attachment and legal questions have arisen in regards to its sale, owing to the lapsing of installments.


NOTICE

  Sunday morning some boys took the hose cart at the depot out on the road and pulled all the hose off the cart, then put the cart back in the house. Mr. Jack Peck of the freight depot notified the fire department of the condition.

  Anyone meddling with anything pertaining to the fire apparatus, except for fire protection, will be immediately prosecuted.

I was wondering why you always show the same comic strip but apparently comic strips as a thing really didn't pick up until the introduction of Gasoline Alley and Ripley's Believe It or Not toward the end of the year of 1918.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6055 on: January 14, 2018, 06:12:40 PM »
I was wondering why you always show the same comic strip but apparently comic strips as a thing really didn't pick up until the introduction of Gasoline Alley and Ripley's Believe It or Not toward the end of the year of 1918.

Everett is easy to locate and display so it is mostly for convenience sake.  Plus I like it when he gives occasional comeuppance to people that deserve it.  There are some full panel Sunday comics in the Sun and the Times but they are difficult to reproduce and I find them kind of boring actually.  That said, I really dig Gasoline Alley so I am glad you noted that it is coming up later on in 1918.  Will be on the look out for it.

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6056 on: January 15, 2018, 02:35:01 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum.


Quote
French troops watching the arrival of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers at Ham to take over a section of the line south of the Somme, 15 January 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246330 © IWM (Q 10652)


Quote
Troops of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers march into Ham to take over a section of the line south of the Somme, 15 January 1918. Note the goat mascot.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246331 © IWM (Q 10653)


Quote
British and French soldiers gather together in Ham on the Somme as the 36th Division takes over part of the line from the French, 15 January 1918.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246333 © IWM (Q 10655)


From the Europeana Collection.


Shot-up church at Tezze. Date: January 15, 1918.
https://www.europeana.eu/portal/en/record/9200291/BibliographicResource_3000073604602.html?utm_source=api&utm_medium=api&utm_campaign=api2demo http://www.bildarchivaustria.at/Pages/Search/Result.aspx?p_eBildansicht=2&p_ItemID=1 https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6057 on: January 15, 2018, 03:32:25 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, January 15, 1918.


GEORGE BECKLEY IS BADLY BURNED

  Last Saturday evening while the power and lights of the Nevada-California Power company were out for a short time, George Beckley, leasee of the Kendall block, went into the basement where is installed the motor that runs the oil furnace which furnishes heat to the building and which has an automatic shut-off. But in this case the automatic had failed to work.

  On entering the motor room Mr. Beckley noticed that considerable gas was in evidence and took precautions by lighting a piece of paper and throwing it into the room. No explosion occurred and he then lighted a whole newspaper and threw it in. A blast followed and a flare-back that shot through the door at which Beckley was standing burned him about the head.
 
  He is now at the Mine Operators' hospital. It is believed that his eyesight was not permanently impaired.


BLOOM NURSES BROKEN WRIST AFTER ACCIDENT

  H. T. Bloom, employee of the Louisiana Mining company, is around with his arm in a sling as the result of an accident Sunday night. Bloom was coming in from Tybo with a company truck, "Shorty" Kutzkau driving, when the carburetor developed symptoms that necessitated investigation. Bloom started adjusting the mechanism, when the truck's front wheel encountered a chuck hole and the resultant jar flung Bloom off the machine, breaking his wrist.



Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6058 on: January 15, 2018, 07:30:39 AM »
lighting a piece of paper and throwing it into the room

I mean, like, what the hell else did he expect to happen?

Re: One Hundred Years Ago
« Reply #6059 on: January 15, 2018, 10:43:42 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, January 15, 1918.


GEORGE BECKLEY IS BADLY BURNED

  Last Saturday evening while the power and lights of the Nevada-California Power company were out for a short time, George Beckley, leasee of the Kendall block, went into the basement where is installed the motor that runs the oil furnace which furnishes heat to the building and which has an automatic shut-off. But in this case the automatic had failed to work.

  On entering the motor room Mr. Beckley noticed that considerable gas was in evidence and took precautions by lighting a piece of paper and throwing it into the room. No explosion occurred and he then lighted a whole newspaper and threw it in. A blast followed and a flare-back that shot through the door at which Beckley was standing burned him about the head.
 
  He is now at the Mine Operators' hospital. It is believed that his eyesight was not permanently impaired.


BLOOM NURSES BROKEN WRIST AFTER ACCIDENT

  H. T. Bloom, employee of the Louisiana Mining company, is around with his arm in a sling as the result of an accident Sunday night. Bloom was coming in from Tybo with a company truck, "Shorty" Kutzkau driving, when the carburetor developed symptoms that necessitated investigation. Bloom started adjusting the mechanism, when the truck's front wheel encountered a chuck hole and the resultant jar flung Bloom off the machine, breaking his wrist.
I guess using an open flame is one way to test for a gas leak!  :o